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Buffoonery, Horseplay, Crude Characterization And Ludicrously Improbable Situations

A weekend topic starting with the New York Times. “‘It’s making me nervous that you’ve got this incipient housing bubble, with anecdotal reports backed up by a lot of the data,’ James Bullard, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, said during a call with reporters Friday. He doesn’t think things are at crisis levels yet, but he believes the Fed should avoid fueling the situation further. ‘We got in so much trouble with the housing bubble in the mid-2000s.'”

“Demand for housing was strong in 2018 and 2019, but it really took off early last year, after the Fed cut interest rates to near-zero and began buying government-backed debt to soothe markets at the start of the pandemic. Mortgage rates dropped, and mortgage applications soared. That was partly the point as the Fed fought to keep the economy afloat: Home-buying boosts all kinds of spending, on washing machines and drapes and kiddie pools, so it is a key lever for lifting the entire economy. Stoking it helps to revive floundering growth.”

“Ideally, officials would like to see the economy return to full employment before lifting rates, and most don’t expect that moment to arrive until 2023. They’re unlikely to speed up the plan just to cool off housing. Fed officials have for decades maintained that bubbles are difficult to spot in real time and that monetary policy is the wrong tool to pop them. For now, your local housing market boom is probably going to be left to its own devices — meaning that while first time home buyers may end up paying more, they will also have an easier time financing it.”

“Reina and David Pomeroy, 36 and 35, were living in a rental in Santa Clara, Calif., with their children, ages 2 and 7, when the pandemic hit. Buying at California prices seemed like a pipe dream and they wanted to live near family, so they decided to relocate to the Boulder, Colo., area, near Mr. Pomeroy’s brother. The pair saw between 20 and 30 houses and made — and lost — six offers before finally sealing the deal, over their original budget and $200,000 above the $995,000 asking price on their new 5-bedroom.”

“‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ said Mr. Pomeroy, explaining that they could have compromised on amenities they wanted but didn’t. ‘Interest rates are so low and money is cheap,’ he said. ‘Why not do it?'”

The Union Tribune in California. “Q. Are San Diego home prices approaching their peak? James Hamilton, UC San Diego. NO: The Fed is on a course to keep interest rates below the inflation rate for some time. That’s a cautionary note for holding your money in bonds or stocks, and makes real estate one of the most attractive investments available now. The increase in house prices can’t go on forever, but it’s too soon to call the peak. Don’t sell your home to the first offer because a higher one may be coming.”

“Norm Miller, University of San Diego. NO: We have a runway of increasing prices, driven by low rates, low inventories and modest new construction. Sellers fear not being able to find a new home if they sell. Keep in mind that it is not so much income driving the second and third home prices, but rather equity gained on prior homes and a buoyant stock market that is rolled into the next purchase. The hard part for new home buyers is getting on that carousel.”

“Kelly Cunningham, San Diego Institute for Economic Research. YES: Prices will reach a peak, but San Diego is not there yet. The ratio of median home price in San Diego is currently 7.0 times the median household income. This ratio previously peaked at 8.0 in the fourth quarter of 2005 before collapsing to 3.6 by the first quarter of 2009. Los Angeles’ housing price ratio is currently 10.1 times their median income, while Orange County is already shrinking from recent 8.3 peak to 7.9.”

The Globe and Mail in Canada. “A report from Oxford economics released in May showed Toronto to be one of the least affordable cities for housing in North America, edging out New York, Los Angeles, Seattle and other major cities. The average selling price across the Toronto area in June, 2021, was $1,089,536. While that number has now dropped for three consecutive months, it still represents a 17-per-cent jump from last year’s average price.”

“Agent Nadia Prokopiw said there are still many good housing deals in Etobicoke’s south end. But she herself was surprised the townhouse she listed for $914,900 sold for less than asking price. ‘I think everybody was surprised,’ Ms. Prokopiw said, before pointing to the recent, slight lull in Toronto’s real estate market. ‘Sometimes, it’s the timing of the market. People become tired and worn out.'”

“Ms. Prokopiw said the home was sold in move-in condition – and its finished basement, large kitchen, living and dining rooms made it a steal for the buyers. The bedrooms are small, but she viewed that as a small price to pay for such a deal. ‘If you’re going to get a home under $1-million, you have to accept that there is going to be some flaw,’ she said. ‘You have to put up with some compromise.'”

From New Orleans Public Radio. “When Dora Whitfield bought her house in 2014, she and her husband were so giddy they invited a caravan of family members over to see the place. It was a hard-earned present she was able to afford because of her job as a uffet waitress at Harrah’s Casino. The job also gave her a steady income with enough money left over to play the penny slots.”

“The tips were enough to make paying bills like a matching game. If a $100 light bill arrived on Tuesday, she could cover it with Wednesday’s tips. Her Mortgage? Combine a couple of mimosa weekends and it was paid in full. She took pride in never being behind on a bill. The game changed when she went on unemployment. Whitfield was surprised that Louisiana offered $240 a week — a little more than a third of what she earned in tips.”

“Now, the additional federal unemployment benefits that helped her will soon disappear. Louisiana is ending the $300 weekly payments on July 31. As she weighs these decisions, she cannot help but think about the risk of losing the house she loves so much. It is a fear that keeps her up at night. It is even more likely she will lose her car. She is willing to accept the loss of her Buick if it means holding onto her home. ‘I’m not giving this house up,’ Whitfield said. ‘I will take that 2017 Buick Verano and take it away from here. We had it for three years. Time for it to go if it had to go.'”

From Bloomberg. “The safe-asset shortage is over. Should we worry? A safe asset is any asset that you can sell at any time and be sure to get your money back. That often means short-term government bonds or bank deposits. Hence, when demand for government-issued securities outstripped supply, economists called it a ‘safe-asset shortage’. The phrase ‘safe asset’ may sound boring—more speculative assets like Bitcoin and derivatives on Tesla stock seem sexier—but safe assets are the most important and in some ways the riskiest assets available.”

“And they touch everything. They appear in nearly every asset-pricing model, they’re used as collateral and are necessary for regulation and for managing currencies. They influence how much your bank pays in interest, your mortgage rate, how much debt the country can issue and where the US Federal Reserve sets interest rates.”

“For decades, economists argued there was a shortage of safe assets in America, which may have caused the financial crisis and depressed growth. Now it appears the shortage is over.”

“Two decades with shortages means a generation of policymakers have come to take low rates for granted. An insatiable appetite for bonds meant the government could issue as much debt as it wanted for very low rates. This explains why the US is now considering a $3.5 trillion spending package when we aren’t even in a recession.”

“But if we’re now facing a safe-asset glut, rates will rise, and so will the cost of all the new debt, and the obligations we already have will suddenly turn much more expensive.”

The Journal Record. “Farce (noun): a comic dramatic work using buffoonery and horseplay and typically including crude characterization and ludicrously improbable situations. ‘Mortgage-backed security purchases really work a lot like Treasury purchases. They are not especially important in what is happening with housing prices.’ – Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, July 2021.”

“I couldn’t agree more with the first sentence, while the assertion in his second sentence is laugh-out-loud funny. The most important benchmark in the bond market is the interest rate on the 10-Year U.S. Treasury Note. Bonds of all sorts, including mortgage-backed securities, are priced by traders based on a spread relative to the U.S. Treasury yields. Therefore, if Treasury yields decline in the market, mortgage rates are primed to decrease as well.”

“According to Bloomberg, the Fed has purchased a net $2.6 trillion of new U.S. Treasurys since mid-March 2020. Treasury.gov shows that to be over half of the total new debt issued by the Treasury in that time frame. Do you think that having one buyer in the market soaking up half the supply just might raise prices (and lower yields)?”

“The Federal Reserve has also purchased a net $1.055 trillion of mortgage-backed securities from mid-March 2020 through July 21, 2021 according to Bloomberg data. The latest data available from SIFMA.org shows that the total value of all agency mortgage-backed securities outstanding increased by just $900 billion from the first quarter of 2020 through the first quarter of this year. The Fed is essentially buying up the entirety of newly available supply in the mortgage market. If the Fed wasn’t spraying newly printed dollars into the mortgage market, do you think interest rates might be higher?”

“The lower the interest rate paid by the average American mortgage borrower, the higher the price they are willing to pay. Indeed, prices are up 16.61% year-over-year through May per the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index, an increase that Chair Powell describes as ‘too much.'”

“Certainly, we are living through a time of great dislocation and upheaval, which undoubtedly contributes to housing price increases, along with unprecedented fiscal stimulus from the federal government. But to suggest that the Fed’s asset purchases are unimportant to housing prices is truly a farcical assertion.”

This Post Has 136 Comments
  1. ‘If you’re going to get a home under $1-million, you have to accept that there is going to be some flaw’

    You’ll hear people say you can’t see a bubble. Take a look at these K-dan sh$tboxes.

    1. Take a look at these

      Subscribe now for just $1.99/wk. That’s OK, I’ll be in Canadia on August 9. Lucky for me, the floodwaters in the Erie and Oswego Canals have receded.

        1. The US border opening got delayed. The Canadian border will open to visits from the US without reciprocity. So I will go north, and when Biden wakes up for a moment maybe she’ll be able to cross to the US with me.

  2. ‘The ratio of median home price in San Diego is currently 7.0 times the median household income. This ratio previously peaked at 8.0 in the fourth quarter of 2005 before collapsing to 3.6 by the first quarter of 2009. Los Angeles’ housing price ratio is currently 10.1 times their median income, while Orange County is already shrinking from recent 8.3 peak to 7.9’

    There’s yer subprime.

    1. before collapsing to 3.6 by the first quarter of 2009.

      If we’re going play the realtor game of history repeats rather than rhymes, I’ll take this.

      1. I’m gonna guess that prices fell more in places like Spring Valley, and less in places like Poway and RB.

    2. I think this statistic is deceiving. Looking at the SD neighborhoods I’ve lived in home prices are about 30% higher now than they were at the 2005 peak. If you search for SD homes on Redfin that still have historical sales data you’ll find that same units that sold then are at least 30-50% more now and median income has not grown to compensate. I suspect that the median price relative to income is lower now because there is a lot more buying at the bottom end which is driving up prices in east county and previously less desirable areas. On a neighborhood by neighborhood basis, this bubble is far worse than the previous one from what I am seeing.

      1. I did a bit of work for HBBers to illustrate my point. These are not cherry picked in anyway. These are just the first examples I found that had data for the relevant years. Most listings no longer include this data so it’s a hassle. But you can see this bubble totally blows the last bubble away when comparing the same units.

        Listed for 850k sold for 495k in 2005
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/10157-Ambassador-Ave-92126/home/4852447

        Listed for 840k sold in 2006 for 500k
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/8234-Calle-Calzada-92126/home/4529343

        Listed for 1.2 million sold in 2005 for 678k
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/8234-Calle-Calzada-92126/home/4529343

        Listed for 600k sold in 2005 for 450k
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/8058-Camino-Tranquilo-92122/home/4901438

        Listed for 1.55 million sold in 2006 for 730k.
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/8058-Camino-Tranquilo-92122/home/4901438

        Listed for 1.3 million sold in 2006 for 650k.
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/6527-Mercer-St-92122/home/4895545

        Listed for 800k sold in 2006 for 510k.
        https://www.redfin.com/CA/San-Diego/8058-Camino-Tranquilo-92122/home/4901438

  3. ‘it really took off early last year, after the Fed cut interest rates to near-zero and began buying government-backed debt to soothe markets at the start of the pandemic. Mortgage rates dropped, and mortgage applications soared. That was partly the point as the Fed fought to keep the economy afloat: Home-buying boosts all kinds of spending, on washing machines and drapes and kiddie pools, so it is a key lever for lifting the entire economy. Stoking it helps to revive floundering growth’

    Yeah, we got the kiddie pool economy going strong. And free mimosas! Without going too much into it, the NYT is where the globalist scum drip their propaganda out. Translation = get ready cuz we’re gonna break it off in yer a$$.

    Oh but they’ll be stroking their chins, in their limos, diligently weighing costs and risks. They’ve got what, over 1,000 “economists” at the fed? We’ll have committees and emergency this and that.

    This is all missing a point. They have been using shacks as a “wealth effect” when it isn’t. It’s just a depreciating stack of boards and bricks. So when their “wealth effect” blows up in everybody’s faces, here they come again, to the rescue! Nothing lasts forever globalist scum. We are never gonna forget the great reset crap and that includes you Jerome.

    1. “We’ll have committees and emergency this and that.”

      Don’t forget the new round of bailout measures.

    2. People don’t realize how much it distorts everything. You see all these RE shills boating about the credit scores of borrowers. But the overall credit score of the population has been increasing since the last bail out started. So now there is more total debt per household relative to income than ever before but somehow this time we did it the right way with solid lending. You have to have a PhD in economics to believe anything so absurd. Credit scores are high because for over ten years people have been paying their mortgages and other debts using low interest rate refis because their houses keep going up in value. What happens to credit scores when people don’t pay mortgages because their houses are underwater? The last peak we had in overall credit scores for the US population was 2005. Coincidence? It’s easy to have a good credit score when your house doubles in value and you can refi all your other debt at minimal interest. As soon as the asset inflation programs end credit scores will collapse along the fake asset prices they depended on.

      1. “You have to have a PhD in economics to believe anything so absurd.”

        On paper things always look great.

        “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” —Mark Twain

  4. ‘It’s making me nervous that you’ve got this incipient housing bubble, with anecdotal reports backed up by a lot of the data,’

    If Fed officials are seeing an incipient bubble, I would call that great progress over the daze when Greenspan, the Bernank and Blind Yellen couldn’t see anything that was coming.

  5. ‘I’m not giving this house up…I will take that 2017 Buick Verano and take it away from here. We had it for three years. Time for it to go if it had to go’

    I’m pretty sure they’ll come get it Dora.

  6. Another FB is born…

    “The pair saw between 20 and 30 houses and made — and lost — six offers before finally sealing the deal, over their original budget and $200,000 above the $995,000 asking price on their new 5-bedroom.”

    “‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ “

    1. “We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates…”

      What they “locked-in” was little chance for asset appreciation.

    2. “‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ “

      Stupid hurts.

    3. “Our educational system has severely failed us”, – were my thoughts, when I read this:

      “‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ “

      1. “‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ “

        DebtDonkey Extraordinaires. California is the birthplace of that brand of stupid.

  7. ‘For decades, economists argued there was a shortage of safe assets in America, which may have caused the financial crisis and depressed growth. Now it appears the shortage is over’

    Bloomberg is also a globalist scum propaganda vehicle. They mix in some journalism sometimes but this is another chin stroking opinion thing. It’s a world of dishonesty we live in. Remember Bernanke’s savings glut?

    Reality-based community

    ‘In a 2004 article appearing in the New York Times Magazine, Suskind wrote: ‘The aide said that guys like me were ‘in what we call the reality-based community,’ which he defined as people who ‘believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality.’ […] ‘That’s not the way the world really works anymore,’ he continued. ‘We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you’re studying that reality—judiciously, as you will—we’ll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that’s how things will sort out. We’re history’s actors…and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do’.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality-based_community

    Anyone think the arrogance and bat sh$t crazy is any less today?

    1. And then there is Post-Truth Politics …

      “Post-truth politics (also called post-factual politics and post-reality politics) is a political culture in which debate is framed largely by appeals to emotion disconnected from the details of policy, and by the repeated assertion of talking points to which factual rebuttals are ignored.

      “Post-truth politics is a subset of the broader term ‘post-truth,’ which has historical roots prior to the recent focus on political events. Post-truth differs from traditional contesting and falsifying of facts by relegating facts and expert opinions to be of secondary importance relative to appeal to emotion. While this has been described as a contemporary problem, some observers have described it as a long-standing part of political life that was less notable before the advent of the Internet and related social changes.

      “As of 2018, political commentators have identified post-truth politics as ascendant in many nations, notably Australia, Brazil, China, India, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, among others. As with other areas of debate, this is being driven by a combination of the 24-hour news cycle, false balance in news reporting, and the increasing ubiquity of social media and fake news websites. In 2016, post-truth was chosen as the Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year due to its prevalence in the context of that year’s Brexit referendum and media coverage of the US presidential election.”

      Post-truth politics – Wikipedia
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-truth_politics

      1. “…by the repeated assertion of talking points to which factual rebuttals are ignored.”

        I’ve seen alot of this!!

    2. If you think I am being too hard on the globalist scum, give this a listen, a bit over an hour:

      DR. ZELENKO DISCUSSES HIS AFFORDABLE COVID TREATMENT AND THE CENSORSHIP THAT FOLLOWED

      https://rumble.com/vkfzi9-dr.-zelenko-discusses-his-affordable-covid-treatment-and-the-censorship-tha.html

      These people openly talk about depopulation, which is mass murder. “Oh we’ll shave off a hundred million people here, a hundred million there.” You don’t reason with people like this, you string them up by the nearest lamppost.

      1. These self appointed Gods are psychopaths, demented control freaks, parasites, liars, looters , power hungry, greedy , perverted, insane , destructive, and murderous , sadistic tyrants. who are dangerous.
        In 1 1/2 years they have caused more death and economic destruction, chaos and crime and insanity , loss of freedom and Constitional protections, than can even be imagined.
        You will have nothing and like it, eat bugs , have no energy , take mandated injections of medical expierments , and you will be under surveillance in their police state with fake and censored news.
        Unreal

      2. If you think I am being too hard on the globalist scum,

        I don’t. I’ve been saying this for years. These people are vile filth who are irredeemable. They are so wrapped up in their selfish greed, vanity and narcissism that they have no self-awareness whatsoever. See: Billionaires going to space and posting it all over social media, Tweeting this and that, etc.

        There are about 1,000 or so people, globally, who need to be rounded up and executed. That would change everything, because the others would sh!t their pants and fall in line real quick.

  8. I just had a flash of insight to how bubbles trick the high bidder into paying much higher effective interest rates and property taxes than the nominally low amounts they think they agreed to pay. For instance, if a FB starts off with a 2% mortgage and home prices drop back by 30% from bubble vauation levels, he will later find himself making much higher effective interest rates than his neighbors, if you figure out the rate implied by his monthly assuming the newly reduced market value as principal. And he’ll be underwater on his loan for a LONG time.

    I may try to create a numeric example later, after coffee. The takehome:

    FBs be duped and fooked.

    1. Haha! Loosing your arse is not the same as paying interest. It’s just gone. No calculus required.

      1. – You can compute an equivalent interest rate for the higher monthly payment those who overpaid are making compared to new buyers, based on the market values after prices crater.

        – Normally homeowners can refinance at lower rates if rates fall, but the current batch of FBs are getting in at some of the lowest rates in recorded history, leading me to believe that they are well and truly fooked.

        1. We had the same issue in 2008-2009. People suing the banks because “the bank didn’t give me a refi!” Sure, re-fi into WHAT? Interest rates may have been a bit higher at the time, but these folks had interest-only and negative-amort loans. They could refi into 0% and the monthly nut would still be more compared to that I/O or Neg-am. Get some boxes.

        2. Paying multiples over long term trend price/multiples over construction cost is the DebtDonkey Method… which millions have done over the last 15 years… now prices are cratering.

          Buffoonery indeed.

          Granite Bay, CA Housing Prices Crater 27% As Crime And Quality Of Life Issues Clobber Northern California

          https://www.movoto.com/granite-bay-ca/market-trends/

          As a noted economist disclosed, “The housing business is a hotbed of fraud. Housing is riddled with it from coast to coast.”

  9. Does it seem peculiar that Bond Kings are seeing inflation when the bond market is signaling deflation?

    I always wonder if these guys are just talking their book in the MSM to lure suckers into taking the other sides of their bets.

    1. The Financial Times
      US Inflation
      Pimco’s Ivascyn warns of inflationary pressure from rising rents
      Leading US bond manager says ballooning housing costs could push interest rates higher
      Homes in San Francisco
      Dan Ivascyn: ‘While our base case is that it proves transitory, we are watching the relationship between home prices and rents’
      Michael Mackenzie in New York July 31 2021

      A leading US bond manager has warned of inflationary pressure from housing rental costs that could push interest rates higher and overturn a sense of complacency among investors.

      The comments by Dan Ivascyn, chief investment officer at Pimco, which has $2.2tn under management, comes after US 10-year interest rates eased in recent months to about 1.25 per cent. Fears of an inflation surge sparked alarm among bond investors at the start of the year and pushed the important benchmark to a peak of 1.75 per cent by the end of March.

      “There is a lot of uncertainty on inflation and while our base case is that it proves transitory, we are watching the relationship between home prices and rents,” Ivascyn told the Financial Times. “There may be more sustained inflation pressure from the rental side.”

      1. “…US 10-year interest rates eased in recent months to about 1.25 per cent.”

        The federal reserve is intentionally screwing retirees who thought they could enjoy their golden years by saving for the future.

    2. Bonds
      Treasury yields fall after softer-than-expected inflation data
      Published Fri, Jul 30 2021 4:33 AM EDT
      Updated Fri, Jul 30 2021 4:01 PM EDT
      Vicky McKeever
      Hannah Miao

      U.S. Treasury yields fell Friday after a key inflation reading came in near economists’ expectations, indicating inflationary pressures may be ebbing slightly.

      The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell 4 basis points to 1.231% by 4:00 p.m. ET. The yield on the 30-year Treasury bond shed 1.9 basis points to 1.897%. Yields move inversely to prices. One basis point equals 0.01%.

      1. Second 5 cent increase in the last two weeks at the corner gas station. But I am pretty sure paying 4.35$ for gas doesn’t factor into their inflation statistic.

        1. gas doesn’t factor into

          It makes it in eventually. The cost to make and deliver things goes up with rising oil prices.

    3. I always wonder if these guys are just talking their book in the MSM to lure suckers into taking the other sides of their bets.

      Any time one of these rich focks is on a financial show, you can be assured that they are talking their book, trying to lure in some suckers to offload their shit to.

    4. The deflationists argue that the Fed has limits on what it can do legally. But we’ve seen over the last decade the Fed has unlimited authority and there is no governmental authority that is able or willing to exercise oversight. The Fed does whatever it wants and it’s charter is meaningless. If the Fed wants to start sending out one million dollar per month UBI checks to every citizen who accepts the mark of the beast nobody in government is going to stop them. So I find the inflation/deflation debate moot because it all depends on what a few deranged control freaks do behind closed doors and not on any economic principle. If the Fed wants to destroy the currency with a hyperinflation they can do that. If they want to raise interest rates to 10% and collapse everything they can do that too.

      Fire and Ice
      By Robert Frost

      Some say the world will end in fire,
      Some say in ice.
      From what I’ve tasted of desire
      I hold with those who favor fire.
      But if it had to perish twice,
      I think I know enough of hate
      To say that for destruction ice
      Is also great
      And would suffice.

      1. Thanks.

        And fyi, I introduced that poem here over a decade ago as a metaphor for the Fed-engineered purgatory between inflation and deflation. Glad to see it get recycled.

      2. The Fed does whatever it wants and it’s charter is meaningless.

        The rule of law has gone out the window.

  10. From the Washington Post

    Disney and Walmart mandate employees to be vaccinated as covid-19 cases spike nationwide

    Disney, the world’s largest entertainment company, said it is requiring all salaried and nonunion hourly employees working in the country to be fully vaccinated to help fight against the deadly delta variant. The same mandate will go for new hires who are required to be fully vaccinated before they begin working at Disney, the company said.

    Walmart, the nation’s largest private employer at almost 1.6 million employees, announced all of its corporate staff and regional managers would need to be fully vaccinated by Oct. 4. Though the mandate does not apply to store and warehouse staffers, which make up the bulk of the company’s workforce, Walmart is offering a $150 bonus as incentive for those unvaccinated employees to get inoculated.

    No jab, no job is starting. But not to worry, corporate will pay for your frequent (and of course mandatory) boosters, I’m sure.

      1. “Encourage…”

        ‘Which stick do you prefer, the vaccine or the weekly testing requirement? Our friends in Big Pharma will be pleased with whichever choice you make.’

        1. Here in California:
          75% of cases (infections) are under age 50.
          80+ % of deaths are over 50.
          Under 50 socially active folks that feel confidently robust/immune, unsurprisingly represent the most infections and are unfortunately passing the love to Mom and Dad/Grandma and Grandpa, who don’t fare quite as well once infected. Doesn’t look too promising for older folks living in multi-generational households, does it…

        2. Britain is a about a month ahead of us. They had a case spike and the death curve barely moved.

          1. Which is why somebody should ask the media and this illegal Biden Coup what the fearmongering is all about.

          2. Britain is a about a month ahead of us. Last time I heard about it, the UK stated it will not be giving the Covid “jab” to <= 18 age group, exceptions being immune deficient, etc. This policy gets zero attention in the USA, oddly enough.

          3. exceptions being immune deficient, etc

            And neurodisabilities. I’d like a explanation as to how a neurodisability relates to the immune system because otherwise it’s eugenics.

        3. Australia has something to say to you. One death in the entire country since last October attributed to CCP virus. One. They are hysterical over “cases”.

          1. The one thing CDC got right is that this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated, and Australia is only 15% fully vaccinated. (Of course, they aren’t saying much about HC and IVe either.)

          2. this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated

            One of the ways you can tell something is BS is when words are not used properly, as in the above. What, is the disease of unvaccination spreading like wildfire?

          3. One of the ways you can tell something is BS

            Best of luck in this endeavor, BlueSkye.

        4. It looks like the FWIW didn’t make clear that I was generally speaking. I wholeheartedly agree that the world is hysterical over cases. I’ve been focused on signals for ADE.

    1. Mr. Buck’s money got some Democrat Party people elected, so all the victims of his racial / drug fetish can be summarily discarded. It’s the progressive way.

  11. The DNC’s FBI Chekists are a fine upstanding bunch who can be counted on to uphold the law with integrity, professionalism, and impartiality.

    FBI Relies on Monster to Prosecute Michigan Kidnapping Plot

    https://amgreatness.com/2021/07/29/fbi-relies-on-monster-to-prosecute-michigan-kidnapping-plot/

    She must have wondered whether she would ever see the sun again as FBI Special Agent Richard Trask pinned her to their marital bed so he could repeatedly bash her head against the nightstand.

    According to the Detroit News, Trask’s wife tried to appease him. Earlier that night, she had reluctantly joined him at a swingers’ party. But the evening did not go well as she did not enjoy offering herself to strangers at her husband’s urging. FBI Special Agent Trask stopped smashing her head when she managed to get a handful of his beard. Trask then wrapped his weightlifter’s hands around her neck. With perhaps seconds to make a final bid for her survival, Mrs. Trask (her first name hasn’t been made public) managed to get a grip on his testicles and squeezed until he released her. Trask then fled the house in his wife’s car.

    1. That story about Mr. and Mrs. Trask sounds like a clip from “The Godfather” with Sonny Corleone. I hope there is a novel in the works somewhere on earth titled “The Fedfather” describing the new mafia run under the guise of the FBI/DOJ/etc and run by the Federal Gubmint.

  12. I need eyes on this!

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/global-covid-19/Interim-Operational-Considerations-Implementing-Shielding-in-Humanitarian-Settings.pdf:

    The shielding approach is an ambitious undertaking, which may prove effective in preventing COVID-19 infection among high-risk
    populations if well managed. While the premise is based on mitigation strategies used in the United Kingdom,24,25 there is no empirical evidence whether this approach will increase, decrease or have no effect on morbidity and mortality during the COVID-19 epidemic in various humanitarian settings. This document highlights a) risks and challenges of implementing this approach, b) need for additional resources in areas with limited or reduced capacity, c) indefinite timeline, and d) possible short-term and long-term adverse consequences.

    Public health not only focuses on the eradication of disease but addresses the entire spectrum of health and wellbeing. Populations
    displaced, due to natural disasters or war and, conflict are already fragile and have experienced increased mental, physical and/or emotional trauma. While the shielding approach is not meant to be coercive, it may appear forced or be misunderstood in humanitarian settings. As with many community interventions meant to decrease COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, compliance and behavior change are the primary rate-limiting steps and may be driven by social and emotional factors. These changes are difficult in developed, stable settings; thus, they may be particularly challenging in humanitarian settings which bring their own set of multi-faceted challenges that need to be taken into account.

    1. I still don’t understand why the highly effective med treatment approach hasn’t become the mainstay of prevention of death or even used as a
      prophylactic for higher risk people.

        1. “The authoritarianism does not match up with the science.” Not The Science(TM) of Scientism, the religion, with Saint Fauci.

          Pfizer is also now offering an antiviral via a Phase 2/3 trial.

      1. “High-risk individuals would be temporarily relocated to safe or ‘green zones’ established at the household, neighborhood, camp/sector or community level depending on the context and setting.” (emphasis added)

        1. Every “progressive” totalitarian regime in history has ended in genocide and/or mass starvation.

          It’s the progressive way.

        2. We’re one step from the “Wartime Relocation Centers” of WWII which “relocated” 110,000 Japanese Americans. It’s amazing how easy and how fast America can descend into darkness with the eyes of many people wide open.

          1. back then they were released after the war. it was done out of fear of sabotage. later, even reparations were paid.

            this time it will be done for different reasons and probably will have different outcomes… like ovens or bullets to the back of heads, and mass graves.

          2. “Wartime Relocation Centers” of WWII which “relocated” 110,000 Japanese Americans. That was so obviously unconstitutional that, of course, the USSC ratified it. That decision has never been overturned.

        3. We need to watch closely what happens in rest of the anglosphere, where the populace has been disarmed. Whatever is done to them, we know that the globalists want to do to us as well, but are wary as we are still armed. It seems that for the time being the most they can do is to wreak havoc on our economy.

      2. These are concentration camps. There is absolutely no scientific evidence which backs up or justify this kind of mass “relocation” or internment of people to combat an infectious disease epidemic. You’re seeing tyranny unfolding right before your eyes.

        1. I’m too old to be locked up and that also means I’ve lived long enough not to GAF if I go out taking a few progressives with me.

        2. There is absolutely no scientific evidence which backs up or justify this kind of mass “relocation” or internment of people to combat an infectious disease epidemic.

          They admit that!

      3. Let’s hope the doctors finally rebel and start prescribing Ivermectin off-label before they start putting the immunocompromised behind fences.

        1. It’s not so simple to tell physicians what to do or how to treat patients in this country for a lot of reasons, some good and complex and others because of the “That’s the way it’s done here” rule.

          I just spoke to my MD friend who’s on the faculty at a UC Medical Center here in California. Even though her specialty is not on the front line of treating Covid-19 patients, it seems that nobody is getting all that excited because they expect another overwhelming Covid-19 wave–that’s not going to happen. They dealt with the big peak in January and now it’s back to normal except for the annoying PPE measures. Probably most of the docs don’t agree with the CDC’s mandates but it’s not possible for individual docs to just go out and start using an off the wall therapy that they want to try–doctors work in teams which have leaders and procedures (for good reasons).

          So when the CDC and so forth put out recommendations, that’s the starting point for the clinicians in this country. The problem with all of these alternative Covid-19 therapies is that there haven’t been any proper clinical trials with enough patients and so forth–it’s not so easy demonstrating that a particular therapy or drug really works. Most don’t and a lot of them can do more damage than good.

          And right now the docs are having much better results treating Covid patients. The number of deaths has dropped to almost nothing in many places and ICU wards aren’t being stressed at all. So there’s no real imperative to start doing drastic measures now.

          Since it’s obvious that politicians and government agencies (e.g., CDC) have taken control of the Covid-19 response, it’s going to take mass demonstrations in the streets by the citizens to change the insane measures being taken. Look at what happening in France.

          No more vaccinations need to be given now, the worst is over. And lockdowns and closures are unnecessary. Don’t expect physicians to change the minds of the Democrats and tyrants on the left. Americans can learn a thing or two from the French right now.

          1. So if the docs are succeeding in preventing deaths, even deaths of the unvaccinated, even without the help of a known drug, then why have internment camps at all? Just let the unvax get Delta and fix ’em up at the hospital.

          2. No more vaccinations need to be given now, the worst is over.

            The UK just announced that everyone over 50 will get a booster.

          3. The problem with all of these alternative Covid-19 therapies is that there haven’t been any proper clinical trials with enough patients and so forth–it’s not so easy demonstrating that a particular therapy or drug really works.

            And no one wants to pay for clinical trials of repurposed generic drugs.

          4. And no one wants to pay for clinical trials of repurposed generic drugs.
            This isn’t the issue at all–it’s not whether there’s funding available to do clinical trials involving generic drugs. The problem is (1) Time, even if you could start a trial today, it would take a lot of time to accrue and enroll enough people and then observe them for an adequate length of time (2) Design–I’ve been thinking about this for a while and I have absolutely no idea how you could design a clinical trial to test a drug like Ivermecten or Hydroxychloroquine in a population to prevent or treat Covid-19.

            Since Covid-19 infection is so common and most people who actually get sick don’t seek medical care, how in the world are you going to capture these people into a clinical trial. And the number of risk strata that you would need to control for is enormous since the range of clinical presentation of Covid is so wide–e.g., you’d need people who aren’t infected, those that just got infected, those that are infected but only have minimal symptoms, those that have serious disease, those hospitalized, those who are the ICU, etc etc etc.

            The number of people needed for a study like this would be huge since some of the possible effects that you’re trying to measure are quite small–e.g., the effects of the drug on people who have only been recently infected and aren’t sick yet.

            Then there are the practical matters. There are huge logistical hurdles that would need to be jumped–setting up trial sites all across the country. Designing and implementing a data system to capture all of the data which would be HUGE. And many, many more practical problems…..Unless you’ve worked on REAL clinical trials conducted by drug companies or academic research institutions, you probably have no idea what’s involved in running a large clinical trial. Even SMALL trials are a ton of work. And I’ve worked on clinical trials run by drug companies and academic institutions for 20 years.

            A trial to investigate these novel Covid-19 drugs would be many times larger and complex than any drug company in this country has ever done–it would take a collaborative effort and that would be an entirely new endeavor.

            The biggest single problem, in my opinion, is selecting and enrolling a control group. Most non-biostatisticians and experts not involved with clinical trials don’t realize that the most important group in any study is the control group. Instinctively people think that the treatment group is the important group to observe—WRONG, it’s the control group. Without a valid and large enough control group, you simply cannot have a proper and valid clinical trial.

            So it’s not an issue of money or profits. There are a lot of more complicated issues in this case. It’s so complicated that I don’t even want to spend a lot of time thinking about it.

          5. So if the docs are succeeding in preventing deaths, even deaths of the unvaccinated, even without the help of a known drug, then why have internment camps at all?

            Of course. There’s absolutely no need for any type of internment camp or forced isolation of people. And even if having internment camps were a valid option, there isn’t enough land in America where you could build them because they’d have to house tens of millions of people!

            You’re talking about the mass internment of a huge section of the American population. This would make the German concentration camps look like the crowd at JC Pennys during Mother’s Day.

            The mere fact that somebody in the Federal Government is talking about interning Americans is the real issue here–this is stuff out of the Chinese Communist Party playbook!

          6. So it’s not an issue of money or profits.

            It largely is and it’s really that simple. Besides having a JD & MBA myself, my mother was a regulatory affairs and clinical development executive specializing in gene and stem cell therapies.

          7. It largely is and it’s really that simple.
            Okay, you’re a JD and MBA so you know something about business.
            WHO IS GOING TO PUT UP THE MONEY TO DO MULTIPLE CLINICAL TRIALS ON A BUNCH OF GENERIC DRUGS?
            The FDA? The Government isn’t in the drug development business.
            Do you want to FORCE drug companies to pay for the tab?

            Do you want the government to organize and pay for these trials? How would that look exactly?

            More damage would be done if the government were suddenly in the pharmaceutical business mandating what trials must be done and managing the process.

            So tell me how this would work? And what’s the point? The pandemic is winding down and will be over by fall. The government wouldn’t be able to get things going until next year.

          8. Money has nothing to do with the fact that there have been no proper clinical trials with any of these alternative therapies. There are many other factors in play here as I have pointed out. The most prominent are the technical issues–trying to demonstrate that a drug prevents Covid-19 or results in superior outcomes if given in the early clinical phase of a non-hospitalized patient is a much more difficult task than what a drug like remdesivir had to demonstrate.

            What irks me the most is the absolutely outrageous and ridiculous accusation that American physicians are willfully letting people die or become serious ill with permanent disabilities because they are on the take of the drug companies. This is absolute horse manure. Nobody on this board or on the countless other internet forums is actually a physician treating seriously ill Covid-19 patients.

            Do you guys really think that physicians are intentionally ignoring possibly life-saving drugs because Pfizer or Merck or Amgen is giving them free ballpoint pens or lab timers? You guys don’t even know how the game works. My sister is a drug company rep who makes a six figure income and I can assure you that she isn’t giving her docs plain envelopes stuffed with hundred dollar bills.

            These accusations are like the ones leveled at cancer researchers for decades. You know, the one that said that the “Drug companies were intentionally not looking for the CURE since they could make more money just treating cancer patients and then letting them die.” The problem with that fantasy is that drug companies don’t discover new drugs, it’s the researchers in the academic world that do.

            And ANY scientist would sacrifice their first born for a ground breaking cancer drug breakthrough. For researchers the goal is to find cures or real breakthroughs that result in significant life extension. Drug companies are not paying the poorly paid people in the academic world to suppress their efforts. That’s just plain ignorant to make that claim.

            In my own lab we were involved in immunotherapy research and one of our experiments by a grad student helped pave the way to a Phase I trial of a NK Cell therapy–it took years of work to make it that far. And it’s just one tiny step towards any “cure”.

            Covid-19 is hardly the hardest or most challenging disease to come around. The most pressing issue created by Covid-19 revolves around the fact that it was man made. The natural history of this infectious disease is truly unknown since the world has never seen a man made viral disease like this before. Arguing about this therapy or that is just noise and distracts from the real issues being carried out by governments and corporations.

            In other words, the fact that nobody wants to piss off China could get even more people killed and result in totalitarian rule by former democracies.

          9. What irks me the most is the absolutely outrageous and ridiculous accusation that American physicians are willfully letting people die or become serious ill with permanent disabilities because they are on the take of the drug companies.

            No one here is asserting that physicians are willfully letting patients die or become seriously ill. We all recognize that therapeutics are being suppressed in favor of genetic juice injections. Physicians are also being prevented from practicing medicine while pharmacists insert themselves in the physician-patient relationship. America’s Frontline Doctors’ recent White Coat Summit is a good window into their world and challenges.

          10. The REAL problem with medicine and healthcare in this country stems from the fact that it is the single biggest industry in this country. More money is spent of healthcare and healthcare related goods and services than we spend on welfare or the military.

            Big MONEY is the problem. How so? Well, you said:
            Besides having a JD & MBA myself, my mother was a regulatory affairs and clinical development executive specializing in gene and stem cell therapies.

            People like you and your mom make 3 or 4 times the money that PhD researchers working in labs get. And don’t even bother looking at how much more you make than the countless technicians and others essential lab workers, most of them having at least a master’s degrees.

            In fact, even lowly RNs make more money than Post-Docs and PhD scientists. And none of you, JD, MBA, RN, and other overpaid administrators makes a single discovery or contributes a single sentence to any research paper.

            Our society rewards and values JDs, MBAs, RNs, and accountants more than academic scientists with PhDs. That is a simple fact.

            So don’t go throwing your “I’m a JD and MBA” crap around here, I’m not impressed. You are part of the PROBLEM!

          11. I’m not impressed

            I don’t expect you to be impressed. I expect you to recognize that you are not the only one here with relevant expertise and experience in the pharmaceutical industry. You collected a paycheck from the industry far longer than I have or will, so get off your high horse.

          12. Statins for Cancer and COVID; Beyond Ivermectin:

            “When I spoke to [Dr. Raymond Chang, author of “Beyond the Magic Bullet”], he was clear that repurposed drugs WILL NEVER be allowed because of the massive financial interests. The medical establishment will ALWAYS demonize and destroy any movement to allow these drugs to prevent and treat cancer.”

          13. I stumbled on the above article looking at Chris Martenson’s Twitter feed for the first time. I don’t know where oxide is getting her information these days because Chris is saying the same things I’m saying as well as commenting that Alex Berenson has a “calm, reasonable” and “very good analysis of the numbers” showing that our public health authorities are lying to us.

          14. he was clear that repurposed drugs WILL NEVER be allowed because of the massive financial interests. The medical establishment will ALWAYS demonize and destroy any movement to allow these drugs to prevent and treat cancer.”

            I just took a very quick look and found this major effort to begin clinical trials using existing drugs against Covid-19:
            https://www.everydayhealth.com/coronavirus/repurposed-drugs-may-offer-treatment-for-mild-to-moderate-covid-19/
            Ivermectin is the first one in the starting gate. This is part of a large NIH initiative against Covid-19:
            https://www.nih.gov/research-training/medical-research-initiatives/activ

            So I don’t know what people are talking about when they say that existing alternative and cheap medications against Covid-19 are never going to see the light of day because Big Pharma and the Medical Industrial Complex will never allow this to happen.

            In Biostatistics we have a saying: If the results are obvious and BIG, then you don’t need a statistician. It’s only when the answer is so obscure or small that you need a biostatistician to pull out a significant p-value.

            With chemotherapy drugs, if they get a statistically significant median survival rate that is 10 months longer, that’s considered a great success and the drug will go to market. If the drug is for women with premenopausal breast cancer, then living 10 more months is a big deal if you’re talking about a 29 year old. I know a girl that got breast cancer like this–struck her while she was a grad student.

            If you’re talking about tacking on an extra 6 months of life to a 95 year old with dementia, then that’s a different situation.

            But in cancer drug clinical trials, it is very difficult to find anything that actually works and most drugs will fail. And the ones that work only work by a small amount frequently. So you’re scratching the ground to get any statistically significant result no matter how small.

            So in the case of Covid-19, I glanced over studies involving Ivermectin that didn’t show any effectiveness early on in the epidemic. That doesn’t mean that ivermectin didn’t work, it just meant that the effect wasn’t very much–things that work really well and are clearly winners show up even with small and poorly designed studies. Ivermectin didn’t pass early tests but that doesn’t mean that it doesn’t work.

            So the NIH is doing these new studies. It doesn’t appear that anyone is stifling or suppressing research of these alternative medications.

  13. The globalists may have captured or co-opted the black-robed frauds on the Supreme Court, but it looks like their purge of honest jurists hasn’t reached some of the lower circuit courts.

    Sixth Circuit Rules CDC Eviction Moratorium Is Unconstitutional

    https://tennesseestar.com/2021/07/27/sixth-circuit-rules-cdc-eviction-moratorium-is-unconstitutional/

    The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that the national eviction moratorium mandated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is unconstitutional. The court said in its ruling that the matter ultimately needed to be resolved by Congress.

    The three-judge panel ruled that the CDC engaged in federal overreach by mandating that tenants who are unable to pay their rent and are in breach of their rental agreements may not be evicted. The CDC had implemented a moratorium in response to millions of people losing their jobs due to governors shutting down their state economies to slow the spread of COVID-19.

    1. Likely rhetorical, but why didn’t the fed just print-up a batch “crib coupons” for those forced out of work?

  14. “Ideally, officials would like to see the economy return to full employment before lifting rates, and most don’t expect that moment to arrive until 2023. They’re unlikely to speed up the plan just to cool off housing.

    Bernie Madoff knew there was no such thing as tapering a Ponzi. The Fed knows this, too. That’s why these Keynesian fraudsters will never run out of excuses for why they can’t hike rates or start to scale back QE-to-Infinity, because to do so would implode their asset bubbles and Ponzi markets and expose them for the charlatans that they are.

  15. “‘We felt a little bit more comfortable paying more for the house to lock in low interest rates,’ said Mr. Pomeroy, explaining that they could have compromised on amenities they wanted but didn’t. ‘Interest rates are so low and money is cheap,’ he said. ‘Why not do it?’”

    A future cautionary tale who has no inkling of the financial Waterloo that awaits when the Fed’s Everything Bubble implodes under the weight of its own debt, fraud, and mark-to-fantasy accounting.

  16. NO: The Fed is on a course to keep interest rates below the inflation rate for some time.

    When foreign investors refuse to keep buying US debt given the pathetic rates of return, it’s Game Over for ZIRP & the Fed’s asset bubbles.

    1. Unless they see deflation on the horizon! Could change the game by making dollars go up in value, for a change…

  17. Weekend article for the globalists:

    “This assault on the family is a long-running obsession of the Left. Now, it is gaining power in radical state laws, critical race theory, and other falsely named “anti-racist” training. This is what is meant when school districts preaching against “whiteness” teach “it is important to disrupt the Western nuclear family dynamics as the best way to have a family.” It is what has always been meant by the mantra, so notoriously pushed by first lady Hillary Clinton in the 1990s, that “it takes a village to raise a child.”

    The real goal was never to ensure there was a broader community available to provide support in need. The goal was to replace the family unit with the broader community so that parents cannot pass along their values. And by the Left’s definition, “community” is not neighbors and friends, but rather the government with all its attendant coercive powers.”

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/editorials/dark-side-of-transgenderism-monsters-mutilating-children

    1. Traveling further into the weeds, I’ve never understood the whole announcing you’re gay thing just as I’ve never felt the urge to tell the world “hey, I love having anal sex with my girlfriend.” Do I really need to know you enjoy having sex with the same gender? TMI and all…

      1. The LGBTQ community feels that the traditional family concept is being forced upon society when a more likely scenario is that it offers the greatest opportunity to succeed for a man and woman who decide to have children.

        1. What they feel is that their actions are a sickness no different from any other mental issue and don’t want to face that. . Just as an addict, pedophile, narcissist or hoarder. So, they want us to accept it as normal.

    2. One church I follow in northern Michigan has a weekly prayer session for “anti-racism”, as if that was something real and standing alone.

  18. Trash, fires and soaring home prices: Idaho copes with city dwellers fleeing COVID

    Bill Rauer, executive director of the Idaho Building Contractors Association, was shocked when in the midst of the pandemic he started hearing about people from out of state showing up on the doorsteps of local homeowners and offering $50,000 to $150,000 over market price for their homes.

    From Ben’s link above:

    “The Federal Reserve has also purchased a net $1.055 trillion of mortgage-backed securities from mid-March 2020 through July 21, 2021 according to Bloomberg data.

    Nothing to see here, move along, nothing to see here….

    1. Moment homeless man screeches like a banshee and attacks a rival with stick during a three-man brawl on Venice Beach as LA’s homeless crisis spirals out of control

      Bummer. I was hoping for “homeless man screeches like a banshee and attacks Gavin Newsom, chewing off his ear and gouging out his eyeball.” A guy can dream.

    2. Just prior to the 4th of July weekend the Venice Beach homeless encampments were cleaned out. I suppose the zombies are members of society.

  19. ‘I will take that 2017 Buick Verano and take it away from here. We had it for three years. Time for it to go if it had to go.’

    Sweetheart, you’re losing your house because you think a car needs replacement after 3 years. I can afford new cars and I drive a 2001 Infiniti and my wife a 2015 Acura!

  20. The game changed when she went on unemployment. Whitfield was surprised that Louisiana offered $240 a week — a little more than a third of what she earned in tips

    I don’t know about Louisiana, but here in the Centennial State all I hear is that the hospitality biz can’t find anyone to hire. Is she really unemployed, or does she just not want to go back to work?

  21. On the lighter side:

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/trey-parker-matt-stone-south-park-aim-to-buy-casa-bonita-colorado-restaurant-1234988885/

    ‘South Park’ Creators Aim to Buy Casa Bonita, Restaurant Featured on Show

    Trey Parker and Matt Stone are attempting to become the new owners of Casa Bonita, the beloved Colorado restaurant featured on their show South Park.

    “We want to buy Casa Bonita and treat it right. I feel like it was neglected even before the pandemic,” Parker revealed Wednesday to The Hollywood Reporter.

    The company that currently owns Casa Bonita, Summit Family Restaurants, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6. For the moment, a possible sale is in limbo due to ongoing court proceedings, Parker said. Nonetheless, the South Park co-creators are trying to make a deal work.

    Personally, I think this is a publicity stunt.

    1. I haven’t figured out how to use Google translation. But I’m sure that the Israelis are collecting accurate statistics. Whether they’re taking the most effective actions against Covid-19 is another matter. This Pandemic has taken on a life of its own since the politicians got involved and started calling the shots.

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