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Getting The Calls From SELLERS Who Feel The End Of The Good Times Is Near

A report from Realtor.com. “The past year has been the stuff of home sellers’ dreams. It seemed they could put whatever price tag they wished on their properties and buyers would still line up around the block, many with all-cash offers in hand. Up and up, was there any limit to how far they could go? As it turns out, there was. Sellers who ask for far too much are beginning to face the consequences: homes that stagnate on the market, unsold. Many buyers are simply hitting their financial limits. And that means that, while plenty of homes are still receiving multiple offers, others are undergoing price cuts.”

“‘Price cuts could signal a turning point in the market, but they may also just be a sign of sellers getting ahead of buyers in pricing,’ says Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com. Prices continue to rise in some of Portland’s most popular neighborhoods, especially in the northern part of the city. Overall though, the market here is stabilizing, says Tim Saeland, an associate with Re/Max Equity Group in the city. This is largely due to sellers realizing they overpriced their homes and their expectations were too high. ‘I have seen more price reductions in the past month to month and a half than we have in a long time,’ Saeland says.”

From Forbes. “After months of mayhem, the housing market is finally cooling off a bit. Home prices are floating back to earth amid an increase in housing supply. ‘Competition has started to slow in the last three weeks,’ said Scott Mercer, a Redfin real estate agent in Sacramento, California. ‘Buyers are pushing back. We’re now seeing five to eight offers on homes instead of 25, and they’re coming in $5,000 to $10,000 above the listing price instead of $50,000 to $60,000. They’ve even started including appraisal contingencies again and making requests for repairs—things that were pretty much unheard of last year.'”

“‘People coming from San Francisco were like kids in a candy store here because home prices were so inexpensive in comparison,’ said Mercer. ‘But we’re no longer seeing as big of an influx of those folks.'”

From WCVB on Massachusetts. “This year has already brought incredible changes in real estate for the Greater Boston area, including prices going through the roof. When we first spoke with Denise Garzone in April, the housing market had reached a fever pitch with lines of buyers, dozens of offers on homes for prices well over asking prices and buyers waiving inspections. Now, she says things have changed again.”

“‘I think the frenzy of the spring, early summer market has tempered for sure,’ Garzone said. ‘Buyers were fatigued, just completely fatigued and frustrated, and they chose to step out of the market.’ Another sign the market has cooled ever-so-slightly is that the risky trend of buyers waiving all inspections and contingencies just to win a bidding war has largely ended.”

The Daily Herald. “A decade ago, it would have been laughable for someone selling a home in Utah Valley to say they were ‘only’ getting three or four offers. After the historically low inventory levels of recent months and the subsequent intensity of competition for homes, however, having only a few offers on homes is a sign of the market settling — at least a little bit. ‘Everything has been going so fast,’ said Andrew Ford of Highland, who is the 2021 president of the Utah Central Association of Realtors. ‘When we would have a listing go active, you would see 30 offers come up almost immediately. Now there might be multiple offers, but instead of 30, you might see three or four.'”

“‘I’ve had a lot of people ask the question if we are on a cliff that’s going to drop off and see prices go down,’ Ford said. ‘I don’t think that’s going to happen because we have a true inventory issue where we just don’t have enough housing. We could be as far out as 10 years before we really get balanced again.'”

The Chicago Tribune in Illinois. “The Chicago-area housing market has continued to boom through the spring and summer, new data shows — but it might be easing up somewhat. The frenzy of early 2021 might be dying down, said Dawn McKenna, of the Dawn McKenna Group at Coldwell Banker, who works in the city and suburbs. Buyers now are taking more time and being more methodical in their searches, she said. ‘It’s not a multiple-offer frenzy like it was at the beginning of the year,’ she said. ‘But I will say this: if the house looks good, and it’s well priced, and it’s (a type that is) scarce in the market, we’re still getting multiple offers.'”

From Inside Nova. “‘July buyer and seller activity had a slight cooling effect on Northern Virginia’s hot real-estate market,’ said Derrick Swaak, 2021 president of the Northern Virginia Association of Realtors. ‘We began experiencing this moderation in activity ever since the July 4th weekend,’ Swaak said. ‘At this point, it’s not yet clear whether it is the result of both buyers and sellers taking a break and going on some much-needed vacation, or if the market change is more permanent and will continue into the fall.'”

From Miami’s Community News. “South Florida saw an influx of buyers from the New York City metro area and California, producing an incredible 27 percent increase in home values. The real question is where do we go from here and this is an article that you won’t read anywhere else. It is written by me and, as a Realtor, I can often sense things months in advance of the stories you read in the newspaper or online.”

“The simple fact is that what goes up, must come down. We have flown too high on borrowed wings. If something seems too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true. There are sayings like this for a reason. So why do some believe that this time is different?”

“I have been feeling this shift to a more normal market since the beginning of July. The long lines of people waiting to get into open houses has passed. The calls I used to receive from frantic buyer has turned to even more frantic calls from renters. The mortgage companies I speak to regularly tell me that refinancing is nearly 90 percent of their business. Inspection companies are available again with just a day or two of notice. And, most importantly, I am getting the calls from SELLERS who feel the end of the good times is near.”

The Denver Channel. “Debi Stobie remembers months of remodeling and work she proudly invested in her 24-unit apartment building before the pandemic. It’s one of three properties she and her husband own in the Denver Metro area. Now, 18 months later, a once-rewarding stream of income has turned into lingering uncertainty. Now, between mortgage payments, taxes, and day-to-day operations, Stobie says she’s barely able to break even on her monthly bills.”

“While Stobie isn’t in a financial hole just yet, Stephanie Graves, a property owner in Houston, Texas has a different story. ‘I have a property that has 14 units and there’s three residents that haven’t paid,’ said Graves. ‘Each have a balance of over $10,000.’ Graves says she’s now digging in her own savings to cover more than $30,000 in back rent payments, while apartment amenities suffer. ‘We can’t just go out and buy a $4,500 AC unit,’ she said. ‘We have to find somebody that will extend us credit so we can replace that for the resident. I don’t think we have the stamina to keep in the game. You know, I think we would seriously consider selling the building.'”

From Bisnow New York. “One of the most ubiquitous names on storefronts across New York City is up for sale. Winick Realty Group is seeking offers after founder and CEO Jeff Winick filed for personal bankruptcy last year. A 63% stake in the company has been listed on the website of Maltz Auctions, which is ‘seeking offers for immediate sale’ with a ‘willingness to discuss and explore creative structures to any potential sale.'”

“The sale is being executed through Winick’s bankruptcy in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, according to the listing. Winick filed for bankruptcy last fall after claiming to owe nearly $10M in back taxes against assets listed at $530K.”

“There has seldom been a more challenging time, place and type of real estate market than the past few years in New York City retail real estate. Property values have plummeted, resulting in billions in loses to major owners like Vornado, as availability has continued to rise and leasing activity hasn’t recovered. Even before the coronavirus pandemic, midsized brokerages had struggled, with some, like Eastern Consolidated, closing completely.”

This Post Has 138 Comments
  1. ‘was there any limit to how far they could go? As it turns out, there was. Sellers who ask for far too much are beginning to face the consequences’

    This is the REIC stabbing loanowners in the back cuz Mercedes payments. “You fooked up, you trusted us!”

  2. ‘as a Realtor, I can often sense things months in advance of the stories you read in the newspaper or online’

    ‘Impossible to see, the future is.’ Yoda.

    ‘I have been feeling this shift to a more normal market since the beginning of July. The long lines of people waiting to get into open houses has passed. The calls I used to receive from frantic buyer has turned to even more frantic calls from renters. The mortgage companies I speak to regularly tell me that refinancing is nearly 90 percent of their business. Inspection companies are available again with just a day or two of notice. And, most importantly, I am getting the calls from SELLERS who feel the end of the good times is near’

    Cut yer prices you greedy bashtards I’m starvin Marvin here!

    1. ‘I have been feeling this shift to a more normal market since the beginning of July.

      It isn’t about your feelings, Hal. What does the data say?

  3. ‘They’ve even started including appraisal contingencies again and making requests for repairs—things that were pretty much unheard of last year’

    Appraisals? Wa’s that? Rock solid lending I tells ya.

    Jeebus the crater is building. I’ll have to try to catch up on the international stuff later this week. And the commercial RE crater is so deep I’m having to let a lot of it go.

    1. Ben,

      Not fake news.

      Real estate in Kabul was in a bubble too. Insane prices.

      Wonder how the appraisals are coming in now.

        1. “Nobody could have predicted it.”

          “Never fight a land war in Asia or bet against a Sicilian when death is on the line.”

          Anyone with a modest knowledge of history, or who has seen “The Princess Bride” could have predicted it.

          1. It was in jest. They know what they are doing. Otherwise, oh no, you ain’t gonna pin this fiasco on KH.

      1. “conversion of commercial vacancies into residential”

        The fantasy there is that there is a lack of residential property to absorb the conversions. There is no shortage of residences, only speculators hoarding. They’re about to “dishoard,” because somebody just yelled “FIRE.”

        1. “There is no shortage of residences, only speculators hoarding.”

          Isn’t it incredible that REIC-paid journalists, economists, and various other spokesmen can never get this simple fact straightened out inside of their thick skulls. The Good Lord must have given them rocks for brains.

  4. ‘Price cuts could signal a turning point in the market, but they may also just be a sign of sellers getting ahead of buyers in pricing,’

    I know housing ain’t lumber futures, but it seems entirely possible that the Fed’s pandemic-related Unlimited Quantitative Easing liquidity tsunami similarly impacted both asset classes. If so, the sudden onset of price cuts following a period of historically rapid appreciation could signal the onset of a plunge into the crater.

    1. “The simple fact is that what goes up, must come down. We have flown too high on borrowed wings. If something seems too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true. There are sayings like this for a reason. So why do some believe that this time is different?”

      Anything which can’t continue forever will end.

      — Stein’s Law

      1. This UHS also repeats the lie that people moved into Miami. Something like 40,000 people moved out the past year and a half. This is what a mine field we walk in the era of “narratives.” Saying something over and over that is the complete opposite.

        1. There’s a long list of realtor manufactured tall tales. None of which they have any expertise in…. particularly construction.

          There’s no getting around the fact we’re earning profit building at $48 a square foot.

        2. Speaking of narratives, how can there be all these all-cash offers when most people don’t have $1,000 for a rainy day?

          1. “All cash” offers are usually borrowed money, but from other sources. Borrow against house #1, use the proceeds of that loan to buy house #2. Or, borrow against a portfolio of stawks and use it to buy house #2. There are other ways of borrowing money, but to the rubes in the media and REIC these are “all cash” offers.

      1. I suppose one key difference is that almost nobody cares about lumber futures. By contrast, the pervasive denial, followed by deafening screaming and clamoring for bailouts, that would accompany another wave of residential real estate price collapse would be epic.

        1. I’m curious about why the Fed chooses to intervene in stocks and real estate overtly, but they’re letting this lumber decline continue. If the tulip bulb mania happened in 2020, or the Beanie Baby mania came back, would they seek to support that?

          As I understand it, asset price deflation is what they don’t want. Here is asset price deflation. It doesn’t have to be connected to debt – stonks are not.

          We watch the data points include and exclude possibilities. With real estate and stocks, it could just be that politicians and Wall Streeters, whom the Fed serves, are heavily invested directly in RE and stonks. Studies which show stonk and RE rising prices are critical for the economy are preferentially selected for publishing in journals (the social sciences are very much like a religious orthodoxy – adhere and tout the orthodoxy, and you’ll be elevated; seek to upend the orthodoxy and you’ll be shunned).

          “Debt deflation into Depression!” is one rallying cry.

          Finally, it occurs to me that indebted people are easier to control and are more lucrative to the PTB. I’m sure this has occurred to thinkers much more astute than I, in finance and politics. And it’s a fact not lost on them.

          1. Here is asset price deflation

            I rather doubt that a very short lived speculative moonshot in 2×4 futures establishes a new “asset” baseline.

          2. “I rather doubt that a very short lived speculative moonshot in 2×4 futures establishes a new “asset” baseline.”

            Careful…. you’re poking at The DebtDonkey Creed.

          3. Stocks and real estate bubbles create the fake wealth effort. Lumber bubble do not. Btw, the lumber prices though crashed, is still higher than March 2020 levels.

          4. I would very much like to put a few senior central banking officials under truth serum and ask, “If a tulip bulb mania happened today, would you seek to keep it going, and why or why not?”

            It would be useful for financial planning.

          5. “I’m curious about why the Fed chooses to intervene in stocks and real estate overtly, but they’re letting this lumber decline continue.”

            I believe this relates to the amounts and distribution of ownership of an asset class across U.S. households, as related to the much touted Wealth Effect concept. Since most households lack vast HODLings of lumber futures or crypto, craters in these asset classes have limited negative wealth effects.

            By contrast, stocks and housing are much more broadly owned in larger amounts, often supported by massive leverage. Craters in these asset classes represent a form of systemic risk which the Fed claims the prerogative to control. Never mind that most of the benefits land in the pockets of the 1% who HODL the lion’s share of these assets.

          6. “If a tulip bulb mania happened today, would you seek to keep it going, and why or why not?”

            I can help you with this. Did you notice what the Fed did in the aftermath of the 2007-2009 collapse of Housing Bubble 1.0?

            They have already demonstrated a policy to prop up bubbles, after initially denying their existence for years on end, with hair-of-the-dog debt purchases financed through Quantitative Easing. It happened all over again with pandemic stimulus measures.

            What remains to be seen is the longterm adjustment to years on end of extraordinary monetary accommodation. We’ve already seen various failed attempts to unwind them.

            What if the Fed never manages to voluntarily reverse their ultra-low rates regime before external circumstances force a shift? That’s where things would get interesting.

      1. I went on the FB marketplace the other day on a lark. A ton of beaters for $2,000 range that never show up on craigslist or any syndicated autotrader type sites. I wish I had a garage to bring a fixer upper into it and do the brake and alternator repair stuff that maybe a few of these need only. At this point, I’d entertain getting a year 2000 Camry with 200k miles to use for local driving and maybe trips up to NH if the car holds up OK. My SO would exile me if I bought a beater though. I see it as maybe spend a few grand and get maybe 2 years out of it and wait out this seller’s stupid market.

        1. You’re on the right track, but the problem is that the latest generations know nothing about Preventative Maintenance. A simple oil change and filter every 4k miles, a transmission fluid change every 20k and flushing the brake fluid every two years will easily take a Honda or Toyota over 200,000-miles!

          1. Preventative Maintenance
            So true. I’m the worst. Mostly I’ve dealt with car issues by laying on hands and yelling heal 🤣 My brother is horrified by this, so he mostly takes care of it.

          2. I am glad I don’t live in the rust belt. The salt they spread all over the roads there in winter will eat a steel car alive. Not much you can do about that. Out here in the West cars can easily go 300,000+ miles with basic maintenance.

          3. “Not much you can do about that. ”

            There is…. just got to know how to handle it. I have an 06 Powerjoke with 370k on the ticker and not a stitch of rust. Nothing. My brother has 87 nissan hardbody “pickup” with zero rust.

          4. BINGO! Got a 2006 Acura TSX with 230k on the ticker. Follow the services, do the usual wear out stuff like brakes, tires, batteries. More repairs come up like alternator, starter (both of which lasted well in to 200k) but still looking at $400 or so a pop – still less than a car payment. Largest expenditure was clutch at about 175k miles. Still better than a car payment. Plus now I got a mechanic who was a Honda/Acura tech that has his own little shop.

            One of the best things I ever did was take auto shop classes in High School. Even though I don’t work on the cars very much at least I know how they work, what things are and what things break and what are lies mechanics tell. Saved me tens of thousands of dollars over the years.

          5. “There is…. just got to know how to handle it.”

            Do you rely on coatings like Fluid Film, impressed current or sacrificial anodes?

    1. Turns out this is a real estate pimp piece in disguise. I guess nobody foresaw the onset of price declines just two weeks ago?

  5. Today is Tuesday, August 17th and Joe Biden is not the legitimately elected president of the United States.

    The 2020 election was stolen.

  6. Politics
    CA recall election: What to know about the election that could oust sitting Gov. Gavin Newsom
    Lauren Frias
    15 hours ago
    Supporters of the recall campaign of California governor Gavin Newsom prepare for the upcoming recall election with a rally and information session in Carlsbad, California, U.S., June 30, 2021. Mike Blake/Reuters
    – California Gov. Gavin Newsom will face a recall election on Sept. 14.
    – It marks the second time in the state’s history that a governor could be ousted via a recall election.
    – Here’s what you need to know about the upcoming election — from how to vote to what’s at stake.

    1. ‘”This is about Gavin Newsom and his failed policies that have put us in the state of despair we are in today,” Orrin Heatlie, one of the leaders of the recall effort, said, according to nonprofit CapRadio.’

      1. Why don’t they just say deplorables? We can’t have valid reasons to question His Newsomness.

        “Recall leaders include a retired sheriff’s deputy and the former chair of the California GOP, but it has also drawn fringe support from anti-vaxxers, militia members, conspiracy theorists.”

    2. whomever is running Larry Elder’s PR campaign for governor should be fired, or update his/her prescription glasses RX.
      it’s very bizarre trying to listen & watch his TV ad here in the Sacramento area as the camera lens slowly zooms in on his face in an extreme close-up shot that ends with being able to see every pore in his face.
      WTF!?!?
      I “only” have a 62″ screen: could not imagine him in a Super Duper High Def 8K 80′?! hell I don’t even want to see a Playmate THAT close, much less some guy yammerin’ about politics!!

    1. This is why only a chump believes the gooberment’s Covid information. All they do is spew lies.

  7. Neocons and the MIC wanted the forever war in Afghanistan to continue into perpetuity. Meanwhile, the real terror threat has always come from vibrants, not Islamic extremists or “white supremacists.”

    Georgia bartender seen kidnapped on surveillance video is found dead hours later: Person of interest is taken into custody after a high-speed car chase

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9894833/Georgia-bartender-seen-kidnapped-surveillance-video-dead-hours-later.html

    A Georgia bartender has been found dead hours after surveillance video captured the moment she was kidnapped while walking up to her home, as police announced a person of interest was taken into custody after he led cops on a high-speed car chase.

    Mariam Abdulrab, 27, had ended her shift at Revery VR Bar early Friday morning and stopped at a gas station on her way home when she was followed and kidnapped while walking up to her front door, her friend Elisha Kim posted on Facebook.

    1. GEORGENEWS on Telegram has this photo and another with the following caption: POTUS 45 arrival at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan on November 28th, 2019. Both these iconic images were taken at 11:19AM ET #T45 #Afghanistan.

      1. ‘The team of forensic auditors in Arizona are set to release their preliminary report on fraud in the 2020 election next week. According to reports Sunday, state auditors will release their early findings the week of August 22.’

        ‘The preliminary report is expected to show data and election discrepancies found in Maricopa County that they have analyzed to date. Meanwhile, auditors have yet to examine internet routers and voting machines under subpoenas by the state Senate.’

        ‘Republican state Sen. Wendy Rogers said other states can now use Arizona’s experience to conduct their own audits. “The media is beside itself because they won’t communicate the truth of the excruciating detail to which this analysis was done,” she stated. “2.1 million ballots…this is a package-able effort, this is a transportable, usable again in other states project that you can take.”

        ‘Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is now expected to enforce the subpoenas to acquire the routers, voting machines and other evidence from the Maricopa Board of Supervisors and Dominion Voting Systems.’

        https://www.oann.com/reports-ariz-auditors-to-release-findings-on-election-fraud/

        So why would they break the law to keep auditors from looking at the routers and machines? It was an honest election, so we’re told. BTW, I learned at the Cyber Symposium that Rogers lives in Flagstaff. That’s pretty cool.

    1. Would be a good time for folks to take a gander at the DCD declaration form. In order to be not evicted, you have to declare that you lost income in an geographic area with substantial COVID-19 spread and that you have made a good faith effort to pay rent. You have to check a lot of boxes, all under the penalty of perjury. All those people who kept their jobs and thumbed their noses at the LL just because they could need to have the book thrown at them.

      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/EvictionProtectDeclare_508.pdf

        1. My guess: contacting landlord or representative for temporary modification of lease agreement with subsequent partial payments.

  8. About the Houston couple pulling personal cash to subsidize no rents. First mistake in. Business is to never use personal funds to stay afloat. Aside from that, it makes me wonder if the moratorium on rents is to squeeze the small landlords into default so the fed families can buy up all the RE with their “from air” currency. Actually, it’s worse than that, they loan with no money available, and they buy with no money available. It ‘s all pretend.

    1. No crisis to be wasted. Just business. The sayings could go on. The UHNW masters hate the little people.

      1. What a joke. They should have ended these purchases MONTHS ago, yet they continue dropping tankers of fuel on a raging inferno.

        1. Crypto, obviously.

          Why crypto? Gold in hand might actually get you out of the country/across the border. A bitcoin wallet id scrawled on a piece of paper will….let you wipe yer arse once?

          1. There’s a prepper’s tale about paying cash for a handgun. At the conclusion of the deal someone will own the handgun and the cash!

          2. I was imagining the challenge of HODLing physical at the point of religious extremists taking over the country might be greater than establishing a crypto wallet. But agreed that an actual medium of exchange, such as physical gold, could be more useful for getting out of the country.

          3. There’s also the security issue. They would take all your gold and you would be stuck. But I guess you could buy bodyguards with the gold. Does the Taliban even know what a bitcoin is?

        1. LOL@ every millennial knows that electricity just magically flows out of the wall, and refuses to acknowledge that almost all of it is generated from burning coal.

      1. Wonder if NBC/Lorne Michael will scrub all the SNL skits with Horatio from future videos. Especially the corksoaker type ones.

        1. He appeared in a couple of Mandalorian episodes. Has Disney/Lucasfilm announced they’re canceling him?

    1. was just telling the wife last night that boring & dull mike pence ‘s policy of never being in a room alone with a woman is proving to be very astute.
      he may not ever get the flashy headlines but then again it’s unlikely he will have to room with Bubba in the big house re phony sexual harassment charges.

        1. Now that #MeToo has given women financial incentives to go after wealthy men for alleged sexual assault or harassment, thousands of the latter are going to find themselves “guilty until proven innocent” of fabricated claims from women who can no longer get by on their looks.

        2. Such was my policy as far back as the 80s. No traveling with or staying at the same hotel either. It worked out fine, I didn’t make a lot of noise about it.

      1. I dunno “grooming” “assaulted” harsh words if she was a “groupie” willing to do anything for her status. we talk about buyer remorse, well could this be sexual remorse? I knew a few 16and17 years olds in South Carolina who were adults, a job, car and who applied to be a roommate in the 3 bdrm house i rented. No way would i have thought they were that young….and the legal age back then was 16…

    2. “Comedian Horatio Sanz allegedly groomed and sexually assaulted an underage superfan at a “Saturday Night Live” party — as cast members looked the other way,”

      Betters always look the other way when one of their own is busted.

  9. “Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com”

    Who will always be known as the woman with rocks in her head.

  10. Avail car sharing *

    “This program requires your vehicle to be in Avail’s possession for a full 12 months or until Avail ends the program earlier for your vehicle(s). You will not be able to retrieve your vehicle during the program (except for agreed-upon maintenance) unless the exclusive listing agreement is terminated early.

    No pickup trucks, electric, or two-seater cars accepted. Limit 4 cars per location.”

    Couldn’t make it flipping real estate or being a landlord? Become a rental car baron instead!

    1. Yeah, that’s what I want to do with my late model car: let strangers rent it from me for $35 a day.

    1. “The total included Afghans who have applied for Special Immigrant Visas and third-country nationals.”

      These refugees should apply to another middle-east country.

    1. I’ll bet when that poor woman receives her daughter’s death certificate that it won’t say anything about the vax.

    1. Dr McCullough was great in that clip on the trailer.

      The word evil is being used more and more to describe what is taking place on planet earth now.

  11. Annnnd New Zealand is under house arrest again:

    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced a nationwide lockdown on Tuesday after a new case of COVID-19 was discovered in the biggest city of Auckland.

    The lockdown will run seven days in Auckland, but three days elsewhere. Ardern said authorities were assuming the new case was a Delta variant although this has not been confirmed.

    For one lousy case. Those idiots are going to be locked down forever.

    Sheesh, the vax has to have already killed more people in NZ than the virus.

    1. What every happened to tracing the people this one case was in contact with and test them rather than locking down the whole Nation.
      We live in absolute insanity that has nothing to do with a public health policy that is justified in any way , shape or form.

        1. This is not going to end well (duh). Talked to two different people here in Vegas yesterday re: masks. Both responded that it would all be over if those ignorant unvaxxed people would just get the shot. It will be over, for sure. People don’t read.

          Video just posted regarding the Las Vegas/Reno Market’s impending doom. Very specific in regard to poorer area zip codes.

          Las Vegas: Foreclosures COMING SOON
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mpeFzeem8s

  12. When real estate agent liar says “Things are cooling” they mean “On my God I can’t sell a fooking thing”!

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