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In Distress And May Have To Sell, But It’ll Be At Fire-Sale Prices

A report from Yahoo Finance. “A potential housing crisis is on the way for millions of Americans whose mortgage and rent deferrals are about to sunset. ‘There are millions of Americans now unemployed due to the pandemic with greatly reduced means to keep up on their mortgages,’ Todd Teta, ATTOM’s chief product officer, told Yahoo Finance. ‘At some point, banks are going to need mortgage holders to pay what they owe and go after those who don’t.'”

“Frederick Neustein, a Florida foreclosure attorney, said there’s a misconception that foreclosure proceedings have not been going ahead during the pandemic. In the Sunshine State, Governor Ron DeSantis ordered a moratorium on evictions and foreclosures until August 1; but in practice, Neustein said the order only stops law enforcement and judges from finalizing proceedings.”

“‘I’m getting dozens of calls every day with clients getting serviced with foreclosure papers,’ Neustein said. ‘Banks are mostly going forward,’ he said. ‘Once we see these forbearances end, we are expecting a huge wave.'”

The New York Post. “With roughly 700,000 renters thrown out of work and evictions banned for the interim, a full quarter of tenants have gone four months without paying rent, Bloomberg Businessweek reports. They’re still on the hook for it, though — often with no idea how they can ever pay. And that’s left many landlords unable to cover all their bills. The Community Housing Improvement Program, a group representing mostly smaller landlords of rent-stabilized buildings, estimates that 20 percent of its members are in distress and may have to sell properties to stay afloat.”

“But it’ll be at fire-sale prices, since the crisis has exposed new risks to owning a city apartment building — and to living in one: Market rents are actually falling in many ­areas, and vacancy rates rising.”

From Real Estate Weekly on New York. “Manhattan saw an unprecedented halt in investment sales activity in the second quarter due to COVID-19, falling to its lowest level since the third quarter of 2009, according to Avison Young’s 2Q20 Property Sales Report for Manhattan. The quarter tallied 30 transactions and $753 million in total dollar volume, down 56 percent and 83 percent, respectively, from the trailing four quarter average.”

“‘In normal markets there are enough data points to project market pricing trends,” said James Nelson, Principal and Head of Tri-State Investment Sales for Avison Young. ‘However, with few data points, combined with the long nature of a real estate transaction, there were not enough transactions to say definitively what pricing correction may result from this period.'”

From Spectrum News on Kentucky. “Finding a vacant or boarded up home in Louisville’s West End isn’t hard to do. On Elliott Ave., you’d have to be blindfolded to miss them. Paul Stillwell knows the exact number. It’s 32. ’32 vacant homes on this street,’ Stillwell said. And Elliott Avenue is less than a mile long, so from any vantage point, it’s clear how big the problem is. Stillwell met us in one empty lot next to three abandoned homes which is next to more empty lots and homes.”

“‘Yes, we just tore a home down here. This is an abandoned house, the one next door is an abandoned house,’ he said.”

From Community Impact in Texas. “The double whammy of a sharp drop in crude oil prices paired with an economic shutdown caused by COVID-19’s spread across Houston was nothing that Houston Realtor Wayne Murray had ever seen before. It was a reaction shared by other real estate agents, such as Kenneth Jones from Coldwell Banker United Realtors, who sells homes in the Inner Loop area. ‘It’s been a little bit of a roller coaster,’ he said.”

“Jumbo loans are defined as home loans above the conforming loan limit imposed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which in Texas is $424,100. ‘They are not federally backed,’ said Eyal Karny, a loan officer with the Houston office for Geneva Financial. ‘Those products were much more heavily impacted. Jumbo financing was suspended in some cases now because of too high a risk. Jumbo loans in particular have become much more strict, so that affluent base has been affected.'”

From Patch Colorado. “Denver’s most expensive home listing has dropped from $13.9 million to $10.9 million. The house, at 460 Saint Paul St. in Cherry Creek, features an elevator to all levels, a two-story gym and weight room, a juice bar lounge, a massage room, a yoga studio and a koi fish pond.”

The Los Angeles Times in California. “The price for Matthew Perry’s ‘mansion in the sky’ is coming back down to earth. The actor relisted his Century City penthouse this week for $27 million, down from $35 million last year. Demi Lovato couldn’t quite turn a profit in the Hollywood Hills. The singer-actress has sold her sleek three-story home for $8.25 million — $5,000 shy of what she paid for the place in 2016. The sale wraps up a multiyear effort from Lovato, who asked $9.495 million for the property in 2018 before trimming the price to $8.995 million last year.”

The Silicon Valley Business Journal in California. “The percentage of Bay Area renters and homeowners who made full on-time payments for this month was 15% less than it was for June, according to Apartment List. The percentage of people who didn’t pay anything on time from June to July also increased, from 11% to 16%, the survey results said. Rob Warnock, a research associate at Apartment List, said in a Friday email that due to the Bay Area’s current unemployment situation and that it has the nation’s highest housing costs, ‘it makes sense that a lot of Bay Area residents don’t have the savings to cover 4+ consecutive months of rent.'”

“The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) right now estimates employment in the San Francisco and San Jose metro areas to be 12.7% and 11.2%, respectively. At this time last year, those figures were only 2.3% and 2.2%. The spike in missed and partial rent and home payments ties into growing concern about future evictions and foreclosures, despite eviction protections recently being extended in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties and in the city of San Francisco.”

“46% of Bay Area residents said they are at least somewhat concerned about losing their housing in the next six months, compared to 35% nationally, according to Apartment List survey data. The company also said that 31% of Bay Area residents said that as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, they are now more likely to move before the end of the year, compared to 21% overall.”

“Somewhat ironically, the increase in the missed payment rate from June to July could be a reflection of the Bay Area’s tenant-friendly eviction protections that are expiring in many other states across the country even as Covid-19 cases rise dramatically, Warnock said. He added that some Bay Area families may be prioritizing other forms of essential spending because they know they won’t immediately lose their housing.”

“‘That obviously doesn’t solve the problem — housing payments are not being forgiven, they are just being delayed — but it does provide some breathing room for people who are in a financial bind,’ he said.”

From Socket Site in California. “The number of homes on the market in San Francisco, net of new sales and contract signings, has jumped another 10 percent over the past week to 1,290, which is 98 percent more inventory on the market as there was at the same last year a new 9-year high. The number of single-family homes currently listed for sale in San Francisco (360) is now running 55 percent higher than at the same time last year while the number of condos (930), which tends to be a leading indicator for the market as a whole, is up by over 120 percent.”

“At the same time, the percentage of homes on the market in San Francisco which have undergone at least one official price cut has ticked up to 23 percent. And as such, there are now 130 percent more reduced listings on the MLS than there were at the same time last year, and five times (5x) the number of reduced listings than there were in July of 2015, for the most reduced listings, in the absolute, since the fourth quarter of 2011.”

From Arlington Now in Virginia. “As anticipated, it was a slow week for Arlington real estate — one of just a few weeks each year where we can expect volume to decrease significantly — this year it was down about 50% from the week prior. Sellers listed some 79 properties for sale this week while buyers ratified just 47 contracts, 20 of which were on properties listed since just last week. This leads to a bit of extra inventory this week, but rest assured, buyers will do their part this week and we’ll see new contracts up a good bit next week. We may also see more price reductions than usual as a result of days on market creeping up a bit in the short term.”

“That could spell opportunity for some on the buy side — my recommendation: Try to scoop it up before the price reduction; reductions can result in a renewed interest and even spark bidding wars on a not-so-new property. If you see a property that’s been on the market for 14-21 days, there’s a good chance it’s due for a price reduction to stay relevant, especially if sellers keep adding 70+ listings per week.”

This Post Has 130 Comments
  1. ‘Finding a vacant or boarded up home in Louisville’s West End isn’t hard to do. On Elliott Ave., you’d have to be blindfolded to miss them. Paul Stillwell knows the exact number. It’s 32. ’32 vacant homes on this street,’ Stillwell said. And Elliott Avenue is less than a mile long, so from any vantage point, it’s clear how big the problem is’

    Shadow inventory is a conspiracy theory. Zombie shacks are a REIC statistic.

  2. ‘The percentage of Bay Area renters and homeowners who made full on-time payments for this month was 15% less than it was for June, according to Apartment List. The percentage of people who didn’t pay anything on time from June to July also increased, from 11% to 16%…‘it makes sense that a lot of Bay Area residents don’t have the savings to cover 4+ consecutive months of rent’

    Poorest state in the US.

    1. ‘Even before the pandemic, California topped the nation in the widest gap between middle and upper-middle income earners and has become progressively more unequal in recent years. But its greatest shame is the prevalence of poverty amid enormous affluence. California’s poverty rate, adjusted for cost of living, is the highest of any state and was higher in 2019 than in 2007’

      https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-07-12/income-inequality-california-poverty-housing

      Enormous affluence my a$$.

      1. It’s a handful of wealthy tech workers and throngs of illegal alien minimum wage slaves living in trailer parks to service them.

          1. If you’re homeless and some dude drives by in a Tesla, from your perspective he’s “rich”. Actually, anyone who isn’t homeless is “rich”.

            Of course the homeless guy can’t fathom how much debt people in fancy cars are carrying.

          2. I know a number of people out there. They have a lot of wealth to go with any debt they might have.

          3. I know a number of people out there. They have a lot of wealth to go with any debt they might have.

            Not everyone is broke. Many bought before prices went into the stratosphere. But if you’re young your only hope there is if you hit the IPO jackpot.

          4. Debt is not wealth.

            Not all tech workers are in debt. There are some wealthy ones, like it or not.

          5. Not everyone is broke.

            A lot of people who don’t have much money can’t fathom that others have a lot.

          6. like it or not

            There are some high wage earners that live on the brink of insolvency. Bubble gains on mortgaged property may not turn out to be honest wealth after all. Like it or not.

          7. There are some high wage earners that live on the brink of insolvency

            As well as highly leveraged paper billionaires.

        1. And a motley collection of old school techies in the middle and their apprentices keeping the infrastructure running that the rich ones are playing on top of. Not rich but making just enough that it doesn’t make sense to leave…yet.

          1. The thing is, if your employer wants you to stay around, they’ll keep giving you more RSU’s every year. That way, if you quit, you could be leaving six figures on the table.

            I’ve had recruiters contact me and when I ask if I’ll be compensated for my forfeited RSU’s, the answer is invariably “no”. Heck, they don’t even want to pay me more than I get now.

          2. when I ask if I’ll be compensated for my forfeited RSU’s, the answer is invariably “no”

            Of course, it’s invariably “no.” Why would a company pay for your unvested RSUs? You haven’t earned them yet. The opportunity and compensation package at a new company will be enough to motivate some.

          3. Of course, it’s invariably “no.” Why would a company pay for your unvested RSUs? You haven’t earned them yet.

            They are part of my compensation package: salary plus what vests this year, which has pushed me into the mid 100K’s for the past few years (which is very good here on the font range). If they want me to jump ship, that’s what it will cost them, at minimum.

          4. which has pushed me into the mid 100K’s for the past few years

            I never made more than about $70K/year in my career. And that was when I was living & working overseas.

          5. plus what vests this year

            That’s counting your chickens before they hatch. I’m telling you how an employer views it. Most employees are far more fungible than they’d like to think.

          6. That’s counting your chickens before they hatch.

            Unless I’m fired, I will get those RSU’s

            You could make the same argument about my base salary. Aren’t my future paychecks also “unhatched chickens?” Therefore employers shouldn’t try to match or better that either. They should low ball me and expect me to gratefully accept.

            Employers can think what they want. It’s their corporate recruiters who cold call me. If they want to be stingy, fine, I’m not moving for a cut in pay.

          7. Unless I’m fired

            Get sick, die, have to care for a loved one, have to move, or the company folds.

            You could make the same argument about my base salary.

            Much different time horizon.

            If they want to be stingy, fine, I’m not moving for a cut in pay.

            That’s your choice. I had a phone interview with a company whose first question was “will you accept $135K/year base salary because we have 4 people that will.” My response: “then you should go with one of them.” The company clearly wasn’t interested in me or what I had to offer; they wanted a bargain. The best piece of professional advice I’ve been given: first make them love you, then ask for what you want. As a corollary I would add: make sure what you want is reasonable. You’re not the first or last person to ask to be compensated for what you’d leave on the table. The people I know who’ve tried have been unsuccessful.

          8. Much different time horizon.

            Not really. It only takes a year for new RSU’s to start vesting. It’s been part of my compensation package for the past 6 years. If I had to wait 4-5 years to start cashing in, that would be very different. But I don’t. And I’ve told recruiters: “I have $40K of RSU’s vesting in three months. If I quit now, I lose them. Can you cover that?” That’s when you hear silence at the other end of the phone call.

        2. Let’s not forget all that California has done to drive “middle-tier” businesses away with fees, taxes and over regulation and further drive the wedge between earning groups.

          Businesses that have plenty of competition and can’t achieve lofty per-employee earnings wind up saying ‘fark it. let’s move lock, stock and barrel to someplace a lot cheaper’

          1. Businesses that have plenty of competition and can’t achieve lofty per-employee earnings wind up saying ‘fark it. let’s move lock, stock and barrel to someplace a lot cheaper’

            And those are the businesses that provide the bulk of the jobs. Not the FAANGs.

      2. Poverty in California looks very different than poverty in Mississippi. A family making 5K per month and paying 50% for rent has a lot more left over for other stuff than family making 1K and paying 50% for rent.

        1. family making 1K

          You could be right if you weren’t making that up. The median family in Mississippi makes closer to $4K. They are indeed better off.

  3. ‘The number of homes on the market in San Francisco, net of new sales and contract signings, has jumped another 10 percent over the past week to 1,290, which is 98 percent more inventory on the market as there was at the same last year a new 9-year high. The number of single-family homes currently listed for sale in San Francisco (360) is now running 55 percent higher than at the same time last year while the number of condos (930), which tends to be a leading indicator for the market as a whole, is up by over 120 percent’

    Wa happened to my shortage bay aryans?

  4. ‘I’m getting dozens of calls every day with clients getting serviced with foreclosure papers,’ Neustein said. ‘Banks are mostly going forward,’ he said. ‘Once we see these forbearances end, we are expecting a huge wave’

    So the MSM wants you to believe the shack market is red hot! Those of us in the foreclosure biz have known even before the CCP virus, this sucker was going down.

    1. “So the MSM wants you to believe the shack market is red hot!”

      You use what works.

      1. ‘There are millions of Americans now unemployed due to the pandemic with greatly reduced means to keep up on their mortgage…At some point, banks are going to need mortgage holders to pay what they owe and go after those who don’t’

        At some point is in the past Todd.

        ‘Banks are mostly going forward’

        First, it’s not banks in the majority. The fly by night non-banks are doing most of the lending and the crappiest lending.

        Second, despite what the REIC/media want you to believe, these are contracts. If the entities involved don’t follow the contracts in default, they would be sued.

      2. Does this work? “Try to scoop it up before the price reduction; reductions can result in a renewed interest and even spark bidding wars on a not-so-new property.” 😂

    2. ‘Once we see these forbearances end, we are expecting a huge wave’

      Try not to drown financially in the next foreclosure wave.

      1. After last time I will be shocked if the govt/Fed doesn’t step in. They had much less reason to last time and nothing stopped them.

        1. So instead of letting rents and prices fall, they’ll step in to cause widespread abandonment to maintain higher prices for remaining properties instead? That’s the nightmare scenario.

          Housing rents and sales prices, and commercial real estate, need price discovery.

          1. That’s the nightmare scenario.

            For who? For us, yes. For the People Who Matter, price discovery is the nightmare scenario. Last time they completely capitulated to the PWM. What would make this time different? Trump is the only potential wildcard I can think of, but he’s a real estate guy…

        2. FedGov stepped in to save the Wall Street banks and to facilitate the transfer of wealth and distressed assets from the proles to the oligarchy. FedGov don’t give a damn about millions of proles who can’t make their house payments.

      2. Aren’t these renters the same ones who are collection $2400+ unemployment for doing nothing? Or are the non-payers gig workers who couldn’t get unemployment?

        1. Aren’t these renters the same ones

          I thought we were talking about the people not paying mortgages. I do expect renters to get booted at some point much sooner than “owners”, but I wouldn’t be shocked if the govt prevents landlords from booting them until the end of the original lease even though it’s not getting paid. Who knows, at that point they may renegotiate a new, lower lease and pay it up front???

          1. But, enormous affluence? Oh but they need a bailout too. Pound sand Newsom! Ask Mexico for it.

          2. One thing is certain, if the guberment forces landlords to not collect rent indefinitely, there will eventually be a rental shortage.

            Perhaps .gov will snap up the foreclosures and become the new “landlord”. There used to be a name for that … the “projects”.

          3. … and before long the liars will be howling “rental shortage!”

            With 4 million excess empty and defaulted houses in CA alone, there’s plenty of housing to go around.

            Irvine, CA Housing Prices Crater 13% YOY As Unemployment, Poverty And Crime Ravages Golden State

            https://www.zillow.com/irvine-ca-92618/home-values/

            *Select price from dropdown menu on first chart

          4. One plan would give tenant 10 years to repay missed payments; separate bill would allow homeowners to postpone mortgage, auto loan bills for nearly a year.

            Geezuz this is getting nutty. Looks like debt junkies win again. I wonder if I should convert my 6 figure savings into gold, buy a house then default and cry poor like the rest (joking). I mean, this is nuts.

  5. ‘We may also see more price reductions than usual as a result of days on market creeping up a bit in the short term’

    Eat yer crowz taxpayer.

  6. I think the brutal truth that our Government was hijacked by the Rich and the Poor , and those are the only special interest groups that count.

    The Politicians sold out Commerce to a One World order pay scale that would insure the gutting of the Majority working class here in the USA. Than the poor is the other bribed faction.

    It’s all very rigged and it isn’t capitalism anymore.

    The Government has become the pawn of the Globalist monopolies and the poor demanding freebies because of the low pay scale.

    I use to live here when capitalism was operative and the majority working class had some power. The distribution of wealth was so much better.

    The big problem with third World Countries is the fact that you usually have the rich and the poor and not much of a middle class. That was the unique thing about the USA between 1945 and say about 1985.

    So, I’m just saying that a strong middle working class under regulated capitalism, with the rule of law was better as far as distribution of wealth.
    If we don’t return to that formula than we will become I don’t know what.
    Really, Government screwed up everything . And anytime the Gov gets involved it corrupts or screw’s up what they touch.

    When a Political party uses welfare and bribes to buy votes, as well as dancing to the tune of the Globalist than they don’t deserve to be in Government.

        1. Also, when you call the working class rich, even upper middle class, I don’t think that is rich. I’m talking more so about the one percenters , monopoly corporations, the Global money changers.

          Yes, there was a time that some people in the 50’s had good Union jobs.
          The thing that was nice was that home prices did tract with wages. Even health care tracked with wages.

          1. I’m not down on the poor. I would like the see workers get reasonable wages. Having open borders just keeps wages down as well as outsourcing to low pay scale Countries.

    1. Government was quite involved in the 1945-70 golden age economy (i.e. continuation of New Deal policies).

      1. Housing.

        Superior, CO Housing Prices Crater 16% YOY As Boulder County Turns Toxic On Mortgage Defaults And Appraisal Fraud

        https://www.movoto.com/superior-co/market-trends/

        As a noted economist said so eloquently, “I can ask $50k for my 10 year old run down Chevy pickup but where is the buyer at that price? So it is with all depreciating assets like houses and cars.”

      2. People paid into Social Security and than Medicare. A paid into program isn’t exactly the same as welfare.

        The welfare State, or the war on poverty was more so started by LBJ under his “Great Society” platform that started around 1964.
        Somehow this morphed into long term Welfare that created corrupted communities.
        Nobody is against helping people out, but unfortunately long term welfare has not proven to help. Than when you have a whole system that makes money off it, and don’t care that the results aren’t good than it’s didn’t achieve it’s aim.

        1. Then the people you think are being helped with your tax dollars end up being worse off for all the “help”.

          1. Also, they have a Democrat operative really to sign somebody up to become a Democrat the minute they sign up for any kind of welfare They almost tie the two together. I found this all out when I worked for a while trying to help the homeless.

        2. Nobody is against helping people out, but unfortunately long term welfare has not proven to help.

          This.

          1. So long as there is a minimum wage law, some workers will be priced out of the labor market. I don’t know how they are supposed to get money if it isn’t given to them by the government.

  7. A report from Yahoo Finance. “A potential housing crisis is on the way for millions of Americans whose mortgage and rent deferrals are about to sunset. ‘There are millions of Americans now unemployed due to the pandemic with greatly reduced means to keep up on their mortgages,’ Todd Teta, ATTOM’s chief product officer, told Yahoo Finance. ‘At some point, banks are going to need mortgage holders to pay what they owe and go after those who don’t.’”

    – Mortgage and rent payment deferrals = forbearance, not forgiveness. At some point, the bill comes due. All deferred monthly payments. All at once.

    – This is a Force Majeure situation. What Is Force Majeure? “Force majeure refers to a clause that is included in contracts to remove liability for natural and unavoidable catastrophes that interrupt the expected course of events and prevent participants from fulfilling obligations.” Unless there’s actual FOREGIVENESS to either loanowners and tenants, or mortgage lenders and landlords, there’s going to be a huge mess starting around Q4, ’20.

    – While the Gov’t./Federal Reserve/Treas. complex can “kick the can” for a substantial period of time, since they have monopoly control of the money supply, it’s illegal for everyone else to print $ (counterfeiting), and they have to “play by the rules.”

    – The bill is coming due, since deferral, forbearance, etc. are temporary, and they’re not forgiveness. For those still unemployed, this is a problem and the numbers are still enormous. For everyone in this situation, employed or not, coming up with multiple-monthly mortgage or tent payments in a lump-sum is extremely difficult, if not impossible.

    – I can foresee more can-kicking until after the November 3rd elections, but after that it’s not likely. What then?

    – My solution is to have everyone “invest” in Wall St. and the stock market, esp. FAANGM + TSLA and hope for the best, since the stock market indices reflect the true health of the economy and are the new path to wealth and riches. /s Main St., not so much, unless you’re in the 1%. /s

    – Right now I don’t see a viable solution to the deferral/forbearance expiration coming soon other than forgiveness. However, the Fed has a printing press and can easily continue to print $ to solve the problem. There’s that one remaining pesky problem about unemployment and the expected “V”-shaped recovery, however. Recall that the bigger the government (spending) and debt, the lower the growth (GDP). This is a fundamental limit to growth. Once debt/GDP ratios get to where we are now historically, one can kiss growing our way out of this mess goodbye. Another positive outcome of a centrally-planned, command-and-control economy, comrade. This analysis is independent of any additional shocks, second waves, or related problems from the SARS-CoV-2 (CCP) virus and related health issues. Just the economic fundamentals. The pandemic only accelerated/pulled-forward the economic contraction that was already baked into the cake from 10+ years of easy $ from central banks. It was going to happen anyway. Bubbles always pop.

    1. ‘I don’t see a viable solution to the deferral/forbearance expiration’

      How about everybody come out from under their wet beds and go back to work!

      1. “How about everybody come out from under their wet beds and go back to work!”

        – Oh Snap! I’m getting more money from unemployment than from my actual job! Working is for losers! Not mentioning that these extremely generous benefits also expire soon – end of month, I think – at least until Round 2. UBI. It’s awesome! /s

        1. Can a landlord legally raise rent during a forbearance period?

          If you were month-to-month. Otherwise, the rent is spelled out in the lease contract.

        2. A landlord can raise rent, but it’ll be an exercise in futility if the tenant can’t or won’t pay. Where this is going to get interesting is when landlords start filing lawsuits for breach of contract. If the precedent stands of letting government dictate that renters don’t have to honor the contract they signed (let’s call this what it is), that risk of extended non-payment is going to have to be factored into the price of every apartment building or rental house. It changes the whole equation. Would-be landlords simply won’t bid on overpriced multifamily or SFHs as the risk/reward proposition just got tilted dramatically against them. In that scenario, only a firesale price is going to make a rental property worth considering for purchase. And of course that’s going to have cascading effects across the real estate sector.

          Unintended consequences are a biatch.

          1. I recall someone on the blog saying a landlord was asking for something like 4-5 months of rent just to move in. That is going to be the reality if payment is not legally enforceable.

            Not sure how that helps the poor, but I’m not a genius working for the government.

          2. Just means we gotta run the printer an extra second or two at the end of the day and make them whole too. But those producers better keep producing enough for all of us or this whole thing falls down.

      2. How about everybody come out from under their wet beds and go back to work!

        More like turn off the XBox. But is anyone hiring?

        1. Guess we’ll see soon enough. Another prolonged lock-down could finish off what’s left of the economy.

        2. But is anyone hiring?

          Absolutely they are. I had to take a trip to the dump today, and they had a sign hiring recycling sorters for $16.50 per hour. They can’t find anybody, because they’re all making $1,000 to sit home and get high. It’s despicable.

          1. because they’re all making $1,000 to sit home

            That should end real soon. Anyone with half a brain should snap up a job before the free money runs out, because once the music stops there’s not going to be enough jobs to go around.

          2. A local dump truck contractor that does work for a person I know here recently complained that none of his several workers would come back to work because of the UI payments. This threatened to put him out of business.

            He told them that he had no choice but to call the UI agency and report that they refused to work. They miraculously decided to come back and only complained for a couple of days.

  8. This is a 12 minute article but i think it’s well worth your while. It is on “medium.com”.

    ////

    Why everyone was wrong

    The coronavirus is slowly retreating. What actually happened in the past few weeks? The experts have missed basic connections. The immune response against the virus is much stronger than we thought.

    By Beda M Stadler

    This is not an accusation, but a ruthless taking stock [of the current situation]. I could slap myself, because I looked at Sars-CoV2- way too long with panic. I am also somewhat annoyed with many of my immunology colleagues who so far have left the discussion about Covid-19 to virologist and epidemiologist. I feel it is time to criticise some of the main and completely wrong public statements about this virus.

    Firstly, it was wrong to claim that this virus was novel. Secondly, It was even more wrong to claim that the population would not already have some immunity against this virus. Thirdly, it was the crowning of stupidity to claim that someone could have Covid-19 without any symptoms at all or even to pass the disease along without showing any symptoms whatsoever.

    But let’s look at this one by one.

    1. A new virus?

    At the end of 2019 a coronavirus, which was considered novel, was detected in China. When the gene sequence, i.e. the blueprint of this virus, was identified and was given a similar name to the 2002 identified Sars, i.e. Sars-CoV-2, we should have already asked ourselves then how far [this virus] is related to other coronaviruses, which can make human beings sick. But no, instead we discussed from which animal as part of a Chinese menu the virus might have sprung. In the meantime, however, many more people believe the Chinese were so stupid as to release this virus upon themselves in their own country. Now that we’re talking about developing a vaccine against the virus, we suddenly see studies which show that this so-called novel virus is very strongly related to Sars-1 as well as other beta-coronaviruses which make us suffer every year in the form of colds. Apart from the pure homologies in the sequence between the various coronaviruses which can make people sick, [scientists] currently work on identifying a number of areas on the virus in the same way as human immune cells identify them. This is no longer about the genetic relationship, but about how our immune system sees this virus, i.e. which parts of other coronaviruses could potentially be used in a vaccine.

    So: Sars-Cov-2 isn’t all that new, but merely a seasonal cold virus that mutated and disappears in summer, as all cold viruses do — which is what we’re observing globally right now. Flu viruses mutate significantly more, by the way, and nobody would ever claim that a new flu virus strain was completely novel. Many veterinary doctors were therefore annoyed by this claim of novelty, as they have been vaccinating cats, dogs, pigs, and cows for years against coronaviruses.
    2. The fairy tale of no immunity

    From the World Health Organisation (WHO) to every Facebook-virologist, everyone claimed this virus was particularly dangerous, because there was no immunity against it, because it was a novel virus. Even Anthony Fauci, the most important advisor to the Trump administration noted at the beginning at every public appearance that the danger of the virus lay in the fact that there was no immunity against it. Tony and I often sat next to each other at immunology seminars at the National Institute of Health in Bethesda in the US, because we worked in related fields back then. So for a while I was pretty uncritical of his statements, since he was a respectable colleague of mine. The penny dropped only when I realised that the first commercially available antibody test [for Sars-CoV-2] was put together from an old antibody test that was meant to detect Sars-1. This kind of test evaluates if there are antibodies in someone’s blood and if they came about through an early fight against the virus. [Scientists] even extracted antibodies from a llama that would detect Sars-1, Sars-CoV-2, and even the Mers virus. It also became known that Sars-CoV-2 had a less significant impact in areas in China where Sars-1 had previously raged. This is clear evidence urgently suggesting that our immune system considers Sars-1 and Sars-Cov-2 at least partially identical and that one virus could probably protect us from the other.

    That’s when I realised that the entire world simply claimed that there was no immunity, but in reality, nobody had a test ready to prove such a statement. That wasn’t science, but pure speculation based on a gut feeling that was then parroted by everyone. To this day there isn’t a single antibody test that can describe all possible immunological situations, such as: if someone is immune, since when, what the neutralising antibodies are targeting and how many structures exist on other coronaviruses that can equally lead to immunity.

    In mid-April, work was published by the group of Andreas Thiel at the Charité Berlin. A paper with 30 authors, amongst them the virologist Christian Drosten. It showed that in 34 % of people in Berlin who had never been in contact with the Sars-CoV-2 virus showed nonetheless T-cell immunity against it (T-cell immunity is a different kind of immune reaction, see below). This means that our T-cells, i.e. white blood cells, detect common structures appearing on Sars-CoV-2 and regular cold viruses and therefore combat both of them.

    A study by John P A Ioannidis of Stanford University — according to the Einstein Foundation in Berlin one of the world’s ten most cited scientists — showed that immunity against Sars-Cov-2, measured in the form of antibodies, is much higher than previously thought. Ioannidis is certainly not a conspiracy theorist who just wants to swim against the stream; nontheless he is now being criticised, because the antibody tests used were not extremely precise. With that, his critics admit that they do not have such tests yet. And aside, John P A Ioannidis is such a scientific heavy-weight that all German virologists combined are a light-weight in comparison.
    3. The failure of modellers

    Epidemiologist also fell for the myth that there was no immunity in the population. They also didn’t want to believe that coronaviruses were seasonal cold viruses that would disappear in summer. Otherwise their curve models would have looked differently. When the initial worst case scenarios didn’t come true anywhere, some now still cling to models predicting a second wave. Let’s leave them their hopes — I’ve never seen a scientific branch that manoeuvred itself so much into the offside. I have also not yet understood why epidemiologists were so much more interested in the number of deaths, rather than in the numbers that could be saved.
    4. Immunology of common sense

    As an immunologist I trust a biological model, namely that of the human organism, which has built a tried and tested, adaptive immune system. At the end of February, driving home from the recording of [a Swiss political TV debate show], I mentioned to Daniel Koch [former head of the Swiss federal section “Communicable Diseases” of the Federal Office of Public Health] that I suspected there was a general immunity in the population against Sars-Cov-2. He argued against my view. I later defended him anyway, when he said that children were not a driving factor in the spread of the pandemic. He suspected that children didn’t have a receptor for the virus, which is of course nonsense. Still, we had to admit that his observations were correct. But the fact that every scientist attacked him afterwards and asked for studies to prove his point, was somewhat ironic. Nobody asked for studies to prove that people in certain at-risk groups were dying. When the first statistics from China and later worldwide data showed the same trend, that is to say that almost no children under ten years old got sick, everyone should have made the argument that children clearly have to be immune. For every other disease that doesn’t afflict a certain group of people, we would come to the conclusion that that group is immune. When people are sadly dying in a retirement home, but in the same place other pensioners with the same risk factors are left entirely unharmed, we should also conclude that they were presumably immune.

    But this common sense seems to have eluded many, let’s call them “immunity deniers” just for fun. This new breed of deniers had to observe that the majority of people who tested positive for this virus, i.e. the virus was present in their throats, did not get sick. The term “silent carriers” was conjured out of a hat and it was claimed that one could be sick without having symptoms. Wouldn’t that be something! If this principle from now on gets naturalised into the realm of medicine, health insurers would really have a problem, but also teachers whose students could now claim to have whatever disease to skip school, if at the end of the day one didn’t need symptoms anymore to be sick.

    The next joke that some virologists shared was the claim that those who were sick without symptoms could still spread the virus to other people. The “healthy” sick would have so much of the virus in their throats that a normal conversation between two people would be enough for the “healthy one” to infect the other healthy one. At this point we have to dissect what is happening here: If a virus is growing anywhere in the body, also in the throat, it means that human cells decease. When [human] cells decease, the immune system is alerted immediately and an infection is caused. One of five cardinal symptoms of an infection is pain. It is understandable that those afflicted by Covid-19 might not remember that initial scratchy throat and then go on to claim that they didn’t have any symptoms just a few days ago. But for doctors and virologists to twist this into a story of “healthy” sick people, which stokes panic and was often given as a reason for stricter lockdown measures, just shows how bad the joke really is. At least the WHO didn’t accept the claim of asymptomatic infections and even challenges this claim on its website.

    Here a succinct and brief summary, especially for the immunity deniers, of how humans are attacked by germs and how we react to them: If there are pathogenic viruses in our environment, then all humans — whether immune or not — are attacked by this virus. If someone is immune, the battle with the virus begins. First we try to prevent the virus from binding to our own cells with the help of antibodies. This normally works only partially, not all are blocked and some viruses will attach to the appropriate cells. That doesn’t need to lead to symptoms, but it’s also not a disease. Because the second guard of the immune system is now called into action. That’s the above mentioned T-cells, white blood cells, which can determine from the outside in which other cells the virus is now hiding to multiply. These cells, which are now incubating the virus, are searched throughout the entire body and killed by the T-cells until the last virus is dead.

    So if we do a PCR corona test on an immune person, it is not a virus that is detected, but a small shattered part of the viral genome. The test comes back positive for as long as there are tiny shattered parts of the virus left. Correct: Even if the infectious viruses are long dead, a corona test can come back positive, because the PCR method multiplies even a tiny fraction of the viral genetic material enough [to be detected]. That’s exactly what happened, when there was the global news, even shared by the WHO, that 200 Koreans who already went through Covid-19 were infected a second time and that there was therefore probably no immunity against this virus. The explanation of what really happened and an apology came only later, when it was clear that the immune Koreans were perfectly healthy and only had a short battle with the virus. The crux was that the virus debris registered with the overly sensitive test and therefore came back as “positive”. It is likely that a large number of the daily reported infection numbers are purely due to viral debris.

    The PCR test with its extreme sensitivity was initially perfect to find out where the virus could be. But this test can not identify whether the virus is still alive, i.e. still infectous. Unfortunately, this also led some virologists to equate the strength of a test result with viral load, i.e. the amount of virus someone can breathe out. Luckily, our day care centres stayed open nontheless. Since German virologist missed that part, because, out of principle, they do not look at what other countries are doing, even if other countries’ case numbers are falling more rapidly.
    5. The problem with corona immunity

    What does this all mean in real life? The extremely long incubation time of two to 14 days — and reports of 22 to 27 days — should wake up any immunologist. As well as the claim that most patients would no longer secrete the virus after five days. Both [claims] in turn actually lead to the conclusion that there is — sort of in the background — a base immunity that contorts the events, compared to an expected cycle [of a viral infection] — i.e. leads to a long incubation period and quick immunity. This immunity also seems to be the problem for patients with a sever course of the disease. Our antibody titre, i.e. the accuracy of our defence system, is reduced the older we get. But also people with a bad diet or who are malnourished may have a weakened immune system, which is why this virus does not only reveal the medical problems of a country, but also social issues.

    If an infected person does not have enough antibodies, i.e. a weak immune response, the virus slowly spreads out across the entire body. Now that there are not enough antibodies, there is only the second, supporting leg of our immune response left: The T-cells beginn to attack the virus-infested cells all over the body. This can lead to an exaggerated immune response, basically to a massive slaughter; this is called a Cytokine Storm. Very rarely this can also happen in small children, in that case called Kawasaki Syndrome. This very rare occurrence in children was also used in our country to stoke panic. It’s interesting, however, that this syndrome is very easily cured. The [affected] children get antibodies from healthy blood donors, i.e. people who went through coronavirus colds. This means that the hushed-up [supposedly non-existent] immunity in the population is in fact used therapeutically.
    What now?

    The virus is gone for now. It will probably come back in winter, but it won’t be a second wave, but just a cold. Those young and healthy people who currently walk around with a mask on their faces would be better off wearing a helmet instead, because the risk of something falling on their head is greater than that of getting a serious case of Covid-19.

    If we observe a significant rise in infections in 14 days [after the Swiss relaxed the lockdown], we’d at least know that one of the measures was useful. Other than that I recommend reading John P A Ioannidis’ latest work in which he describes the global situation based on data on May 1st 2020: People below 65 years old make up only 0.6 to 2.6 % of all fatal Covid cases. To get on top of the pandemic, we need a strategy merely concentrating on the protection of at-risk people over 65. If that’s the opinion of a top expert, a second lockdown is simply a no-go.

    On our way back to normal, it would be good for us citizens if a few scaremongers apologised. Such as doctors who wanted a triage of over 80 year old Covid patients in order to stop ventilating them. Also media that kept showing alarmist videos of Italian hospitals to illustrate a situation that as such didn’t exist. All politicians calling for “testing, testing, testing” without even knowing what the test actually measures. And the federal government for an app they’ll never get to work and will warn me if someone near me is positive, even if they’re not infectious.

    In winter, when the flu and other colds make the rounds again, we can then go back to kissing each other a little less, and we should wash our hands even without a virus present. And people who’ll get sick nonetheless can then don their masks to show others what they have learned from this pandemic. And if we still haven’t learned to protect our at-risk groups, we’ll have to wait for a vaccine that will hopefully also be effective in at-risk people.

    1. Great article! I’ve likewise been frustrated for months by people seemingly forgetting that we have highly evolved and effective immune systems.

        1. Emotions unfortunately cloud our thinking and our emotions are indisputably being manipulated today.

    2. Official Covid-19 Statistics Are Missing Something Critical” . “At the moment, official record-keeping offers only three options when it comes to Covid-19: infection, recovery, or death…. But these official statistics miss quite a lot. Specifically, they fail to represent Covid-19 morbidity — the harm that the disease causes, even in people that it doesn’t kill. In terms of measuring the long-term impact of the disease — and accurately evaluating risk — that’s a big problem…. All these early reports point to the possibility that Covid-19 causes acute infection, but also long-term inflammatory damage. Inflammatory diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. If Covid-19 worsens these conditions — or causes its own long-term inflammatory damage — the result could be millions of additional deaths from heart disease, diabetes, asthma, and the like, especially in already vulnerable populations. These effects of the disease may not be apparent for years or decades.”
      https://elemental.medium.com/official-covid-19-statistics-are-missing-something-critical-155e1e153a2f

    3. Article was written on June 10, before it started kicking back up in Texas and Arizona. So much for disappearing in summer. Just today I watched a YouTube on the Medcram channel describing autopsy results off COVID patients. It was way over my head, but basically this virus causes big and small blood clots in big and small veins, which explains the various symptoms. And the immunity varies widely from person to person, how some people have almost no symptoms while others suffer for months and others die. Until there is a pattern to predict who exhibits which type of immunity, I’m choosing to be an introvert.

      One thing he might be partially right about: if enough of us wear masks, we might force this virus to mutate into something less damaging. Not less deadly — less damaging.

      1. The left has an agenda to continue or increase the lock-downs. They consider damaging the economy to be worth the price to get rid of Trump. There are many ways to manipulate data and they are willing to do any of them. In my first post today there’s a link to something being called Legacy Data Laundering. Someone by the name of Ethical Skeptic posted a chart and said:

        Be on the alert, because here is what is coming next.

        Drawing from old undetected cases (a lot of them are there), and calling them ‘suspected’ or using AB tests to detect them – but reporting them as current Covid cases.

        This is a trick called Legacy Data Laundering.”

        Are they really doing that? I can’t say, but i no longer trust anything the MSM says anyway. They have made sifting out the truth much more difficult than it ever was before. And i believe it’s an intentional strategy because they have little else.

        The bottom line is that i think the numbers are being manipulated. They (the MSM) want to keep us locked down. And they are a bunch of scheming liars.

        Stadler also said: “It is likely that a large number of the daily reported infection numbers are purely due to viral debris.”

        The MSM richly deserve to be completely ignored. I’ll get the news i want from other sources.

        1. “…but i no longer trust anything the MSM says anyway.”

          Agreed, and same goes for other country’s media too. They’ve all been lying, and it’ll continue.

          1. Or anything that reads “experts say.” Heck, I don’t trust scientists or doctors anymore, either. They’re all bought and paid for shills.

  9. What is happening is a set up to another bail out.

    I guess the moral hazard of the last bail out was a moral hazard as many said it would be. No correction of anything with the last bail out, so now again. This time the will blame it on Covid 19.
    I don’t think ignoring contract law is a good thing, but these days it’s bail outs.

    1. If I bought a house today, how long before I could get a 1 year mortgage forbearance? I would totally do that and throw it all towards principal if there is no penalty.

    1. It’s been like this for almost three years now, since Charlottesville August 2017. Real Journalists went all in on the Antifa summer of love narrative after that sh*tshow.

      The rest of the country is seceding from you, without firing a shot. They are leaving cities for greener pastures and taking their property, income, and sales tax revenue with them.

    2. I came across the term Youth Liberation Front for the first time last night. What do they need liberation from, their fast food job and their gender studies homework from the local community college? They seem to be happily shackled to big brother and his propaganda via their “smart” phones.

      Reminds me of that Gilligans Island episode where Gilligan finds a bush where upon eating the seeds/fruit you can read other peoples thoughts. He demonstrates this to the rest and immediately they get into all sorts of arguments and conflicts now that they’re able to read each others minds. I think at the end of the episode Gilligan burns the bush. Maybe the same will happen to social media?

  10. $864 billion budget deficits in a single month is pure insanity. It’s a good thing Generation Z is so distracted by their iCrap and dumbed down by our NEA indoctrination mills, or they’d be up in arms about how badly older generations and the Republicrat whores and swindlers on Capital Hill screwed them over.

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-budget-deficit-soars-to-record-864-billion-in-june-higher-than-all-of-last-year-2020-07-13?mod=mw_latestnews

    1. $864 billion budget deficits in a single month is pure insanity.

      And certain parties want to spend a whole lot more. More $1000 week unemployment, more cheese checks, bail out states and cities. Not sure if the airlines will get more cheese; but it wouldn’t surprise me. Automaker bail outs? Why not?

      1. It’s absolutely sickening what they’re doing. They are guaranteeing the destruction of the country’s future, all to service existing debt instead of letting the overlevered go bankrupt. It’s criminal.

  11. S&P and Nasdaq just turned a peculiar shade of green that looks an awful lot like red, but that would be un-possible with trillions of Powell Bux being pumped into the Fed’s Ponzi markets.

    1. Oh dear – all the indexes went from irrational exuberance to closing red (deeply in the red for the Nasdaq). Has the Wall Street-Federal Reserve Looting Syndicate actuated Great Muppet Reaping III? I was thinking they’d wait until closer to election time.

      1. Not much room left. FAAAMNG carrying it all and now they are plateauing, too. Gold looking more interesting now!

        1. Go cautious on gold. A stock market crash will dip gold too. Boom times are coming for gold, but with pullbacks.

  12. ‘There are millions of Americans now unemployed due to the pandemic with greatly reduced means to keep up on their mortgages,’ Todd Teta, ATTOM’s chief product officer, told Yahoo Finance.

    The palefaces among them will be thrilled to hear they owe $14 trillion for reparations. It’s a good thing I self-identify as a Yemeni lesbian and am therefore exempted from paying for the sin of my Northern European ancestry.

  13. The Financial Times
    Peter Wells 43 minutes ago
    Emoticon
    California orders businesses with indoor activities to close

    California took further steps to reverse its reopening process after governor Gavin Newsom announced new statewide restrictions on a number of businesses like restaurants, cinemas and bars, and Los Angeles county said students would not return to classrooms in autumn.

    Businesses including restaurants, wineries, cinemas, zoos, museums and casinos across the most populous state in the US will now be required to close their indoor operations, Mr Newsom said on Monday, and bars will be required to close all operations.

    Additionally, fitness centres, places of worship, malls, offices for non-critical services, hair salons and barbershops and personal care services in 30 counties, covering 80 per cent of California’s population, would also be required to cease indoor operations, Mr Newsom said.

    Separately, Los Angeles and San Diego said they would not reopen physical schools when the new year begins in August and will instead opt for remote learning.

    The new requirements come as Mr Newsom said a further 8,358 people in the state tested positive for coronavirus over the past 24 hours, which brings the seven-day average to 8,211 a day. On July 8, California reported a record increase of 11,694 new cases, but has seen cases rise by between 7,000 up to nearly 8,500 over the past five days.

    1. “record increase of 11,694 new cases”

      Talked to people in Jupiter Fl. today who made an appointment to get tested, they didn’t make it to the appointment. One week later they were notified that they had tested positive by a test they never took.

      ONE BIG SCAM

      COVID-19 Testing Info

      See a list of all testing facilities available in Palm Beach County
      Palm Beach County has notified the Health Care District that callers may call the Testing Hotline at 561-642-1000 to schedule an appointment at any of the available testing sites.

      http://www.wpb.org/our-city/mayor-s-office/covid-19-updates-and-information/covid-19-testing-info

      1. notified that they had tested positive

        Somebody has to make their numbers.

        There has been an explosion of testing over the past month. Obviously this has to be a profit making growth business. Is the FedGov somehow pumping money into this activity?

        1. Is the FedGov somehow pumping money into this activity?

          Gilead is well connected and would like to see big numbers?

      2. tested positive by a test they never took

        I’ve heard similar here in CA. It’s also questionable if someone taking a test multiple times is counted for each test.

        1. I’ve heard similar here in CA.

          Hearing this again from the person who sent me her test results.

    2. The financial times also reported that serious traffic accidents increased over 1000 fold in CA since 1937 and therefore the governor was banning cars because of the deteriorating safety of automobiles.

      In a related story, they also announced that property taxes will be cancelled because the services you are being charged for will no longer be provided. Not.

      So if you have kids, a home, and a job, you are going to have to pay for someone to watch your kids during the day. And pay your property taxes.

      The thriving salon around the corner was bought by a lovely young Vietnamese couple at the end of last year. After being shutdown by the Governor for three months, they finally opened last week. Today the governor is closing salons again effective tomorrow. They will likely lose everything.

      The FDA warned last week of high false positive rates in the antibody test. At the scale they are testing, the economy will never reopen again. Just the false positives will we enough to keep the economy shutdown forever. Furthermore the antibody test does not distinguish CV19 from the common cold. They haven’t admitted it yet but I suspect the PCR test will prove to be similarly flawed as it relies on the amplification of a gene highly conserved in coronaviruses. Incidentally, I don’t believe the tests are actually fully FDA approved and are only allowed to be used under an emergency authorization as there is not enough stringently analyzed data to demonstrate their true reliability.

      These scientifically meaningless data dump articles in publications like FT are highly misleading. Most of the CV19 deaths are actually from other causes and they don’t even need a positive test result anymore to add you to the list. All they I have to do is claim you had an observable symptom. You can test negative and they can still add you to the list if you had the sniffles.

      1. A friend just sent me her test results. She tested positive for SARS-Cov-2 IgM and benign coronavirus but not SARS-Cov-2 IgG with the following note: You have reactivity to a benign coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2, but your pattern of reactivity does not look similar to patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. You have an immune response to a coronavirus, but the Serology Panel cannot determine if it is SARS-CoV-2 or one of the benign coronaviruses. Huh?! Did they consider her positive for reporting purposes?

        1. Sounds like the answer I get when I go to the fortune teller and ask her if I’m going to win the lottery this year. I’ve gotten better answers from my magic 8 ball.

          Your friend is in the definitely maybe column 😉

      1. Provided by Rhino 🙂

        Provided to YouTube by Rhino

        Stay with Me · Faces

        A Nod Is As Good As A Wink To A Blind Horse

  14. ANTIFA Puss Chop gets a can of whoop @ss opened on him when he fuqes with the wrong guy and the rest of his 10 on 1 tough guy friends run away like little girls when their pal gets slammed on the pavement.

    Not to worry, scroll down a video and the Portland protesters are harassing and punching a defenseless old man.

    WATCH: DRIVER BODY SLAMS PORTLAND ANTIFA WHO OPENED HIS CAR DOOR

    ‘Do not ever, ever touch my vehicle again!’

    Kelen McBreen | Infowars.com – JULY 13, 2020

    Watch: Driver Body Slams Portland Antifa Who Opened His Car Door
    Footage posted online shows an individual hopping out of his car and bodyslamming an Antifa member who had just opened the man’s car door.

    The video was allegedly shot during this weekend’s Antifa riots in Portland, Oregon.

    “Do not ever, ever touch my vehicle again!” the man shouted as a group of Antifa miscreants scattered after seeing their comrade get pounded.

    https://www.infowars.com/watch-driver-body-slams-portland-antifa-who-opened-his-car-door/

    1. as a group of Antifa miscreants scattered after seeing their comrade get pounded

      That was the best part of the video.

      1. But that guy totally ignored his six…completely vulnerable to have his skull split open with a skateboard.

    2. “Do not ever, ever touch my vehicle again!”

      I saw that earlier today. The thing I noted was how distinctly different a testosterone-fueled voice is from the soy-fueled voices of the mob. He sounded like he was military, or his father was. The mob sounded like misbehaving cub scouts that got caught opening the treats when they were supposed to be working.

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