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Now The Record Scratches And The Music Stops, From Here We Go In A Different Direction

A report from Arlington Now in Virginia. “This week’s key figure is… 20 percent. During the last week, we’ve seen approximately a 20 percent increase in local listings spanning single-family homes, townhouses and condominiums. Spin it however you’d like folks, but the bottom line is that there’s a lot more homes to discover in our local market if you’re looking to buy.”

“With the influx of inventory, it appears more and more sellers are taking competitive measures to get their homes sold. Going back to that 20 percent figure, we saw the number of Just Reduced homes jump by nearly (you guessed it) 20 percent during the last week, too. Regardless of what your home search may comprise, now is a great time to explore and, if you’re ready to commit, negotiate.”

From Boston.com in Massachusetts. “Zillow monitored rents from February to August, reporting the now-troubled rental market is even more adversely affected in neighborhoods traditionally populated by students. ‘Across the board we are seeing rents softening but, clearly, college areas are showing the highest decreases — every college neighborhood in Boston saw decreases from February,’ said Cheryl Young, Zillow senior economist.”

“Some landlords are feeling the pinch as they struggle with property taxes, maintenance, and mortgages. ‘Mom-and-pop landlords are really having a tough time,’ Young said. ‘Protections are favoring renters. I don’t know what protections landlords have and how they will get help.'”

From Bisnow New York. “Residential vacancy rates in New York City have soared, apartment rent collections are still down, and nearly 90% of restaurants cannot pay full rent, reports released over the last few days show. New York City’s residential vacancy rate is nearly 12.6%, while 19% of renters haven’t paid September rent, according to a Community Housing Improvement Program survey of 80,000 New York City apartments, most of which are rent-stabilized.”

“In a pivot from prior months, CHIP Executive Director Jay Martin said the trade group has stopped expecting the federal government to step in, and that the industry is now looking toward local policymakers for help. ‘City and State leaders must take steps to stop the bleeding and stabilize the affordable housing ecosystem for both tenants and their housing providers,’ he said in a statement.”

From Haute Residence on New York. “September brought new wave to apartment rentals to large, family size residences on Upper West Side. We are very busy helping families to move back to the city. We have clients who rented apartments site unseen by calling us from Hamptons. Sales show softness as only well-priced apartments are getting attention. Everything is on sale and people are expecting discounts.”

“Many of our listings that are in the $4 Million+ category are less liquid in this market even though many clients are taking advantage of low-interest rates. We took some of the residences off the market as sellers don’t want to reduce prices dramatically. One of the townhouses listed by us had a price reduction of more than $1 Million. The year 2020 was a breaking point for many sellers and brought to market buyers who hesitated and waited in prior years.”

The Commercial Observer on California. “The Apartment Association of Greater L.A. announced the motion against the city today. In June, the group filed a lawsuit against L.A. in federal court challenging the eviction moratorium, restrictions on late fees, and the freeze to annual rent hikes. Those ordinances have caused ‘widespread and catastrophic financial damage to landlords and lessors,’ the group argued.”

“Just in L.A. County, about 138,250 households did not pay any rent at least once between May and July, according to a joint report recently released by UCLA and USC, and almost 40,000 households are at least three full months behind on rent. Of the renters in L.A. struggling to pay rent, about 98,000 have been threatened with an eviction before August.”

“But AAGLA’s executive director, Daniel Yukelson, said that after seven months of not collecting rent, housing providers and landlords are suffering severe financial consequences. He said landlords are in deep financial trouble, and many have been forced to liquidate emergency savings or are at risk of foreclosure. Yukelson said they need relief today, and they cannot wait for court proceedings to play out with their June lawsuit, which could take months or years.”

“‘No government or any other relief has been offered to help these struggling ‘moms and pops,’ who have been forced to continue to provide housing and meet ongoing financial obligations, absent of any sort of compensation or relief,’ he said in an email to CO.”

From SFist in California. “Three months free rent? No problem. Free Peloton bike? Totally on the table. These are some of things prospective tenants are being offered right now, particularly in new-construction apartment complexes in San Francisco, as developers and landlords are getting desperate to fill vacancies. As the SF Business Times reports this week, 40 percent of SF landlords have had tenants unexpectedly break leases since March, according to an August survey by the San Francisco Apartment Association (SFAA).”

“And in SoMa, where rents soared in the last decade in new-construction towers and low-rise complexes, large swaths of units are sitting empty and owners are willing to give a lot of concessions to anyone willing to sign a lease — including things like free parking and DoorDash credits. The aforementioned Peloton bike offer reportedly went with a $1,995/month studio on Nob Hill, which was also offered with two months free.”

“Average asking rents for apartments are down 20 percent year over year, as Socketsite reported last week — and this data is typically based on larger, newer buildings reporting to rental and trade agencies, as opposed to rent-controlled and shared housing. The average asking rent for a one-bedroom just dropped to under $2,900, down from a peak of $3,700 (~22%) in recent years. Also, because so many rent concessions (e.g. two- and three-month free rent deals), what are called ‘effective rents’ for landlords are down even further.”

From Socket Site in California. “Having ticked up another 8 percent over the past week, the number of homes on the market in San Francisco, net of new sales and contract activity, has jumped over 15 percent since the end of August and crossed over the 1,800 mark for the first time in a decade. Inventory levels are now running 90 percent higher on a year-over-year basis, 200 percent higher than in September of 2015, and roughly 20 percent higher than during the Great Recession.”

“At the same time, with 30 percent of the homes on the market in San Francisco having been reduced at least once, which is 17 percentage points, or 130 percent, higher than at the same time last year, the number of reduced listings has increased 19 percent over the past month in the absolute to a new 9-year high, as we noted yesterday.”

The Express News in Texas. “The mystery of the dog that didn’t bark in the night — as far as economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic — shows up as a statistical absence. Where are the consumer bankruptcies? My theory: rental eviction moratoriums and mortgage forbearance. This theory isn’t original. Reed Allmand, a Fort Worth bankruptcy attorney, also explains the 2020 drop in bankruptcy filings this way.”

“‘Most of the reasons people file bankruptcy have been put on pause,’ he says. ‘Nobody wants to file bankruptcy if they can avoid it. Foreclosures are down significantly. Evictions have virtually gone away. Even lawsuits, people being sued for their debts, have gone away.'”

“Absent these drastic triggering events, people do not take the drastic step of filing for bankruptcy. In contrast, business bankruptcies are running well ahead of last year, up 40 percent in April, May and June. The rise in business bankruptcies continued in July and August. Because the consumer economy is complex, we can also come up with other plausible factors suppressing bankruptcies. Increased unemployment and stimulus payments dampened distress this summer. Physical distancing — closed offices and closed courts — may have discouraged people from filing bankruptcy as they did not want to visit a lawyer’s office or appear in court.”

“Allmand believes these delays all point to consumer bankruptcy filings as normalcy returns. Specifically, as foreclosures and evictions return in the near future. Giving people a break in hard times and seeing fewer bankruptcies do sound pleasant. But that’s only one side of the coin. Because now the record scratches and the music stops. From here, we go in a different direction.”

“Forgiveness for consumers means pain for landlords. The system we live under requires that people pay for their housing. Sorry, Bernie, but it’s true. Housing capital, in the form of rent and mortgage loans, is the anchor asset of our system of private property. At some fundamental level, if you can’t enforce property rights — to ensure getting paid for owning housing or mortgages — the system doesn’t work in the long run. Eviction court is kind of a ground zero for the workings of capitalism. As are lawsuits for debt payment and bankruptcy.”

“Justin Solomonic, 40, owns four rental units that constitute his main nest egg for retirement. He’s an IT professional in San Antonio. He built up savings, which he plowed into these four units. He estimates he’s collected just 40 percent of his rents since the pandemic began. Most of the lost income stems from a single tenant, who has not made a rental payment since March. Reminders to pay rent mostly are met with shouting. Or gaslighting, in which the tenant tries to convince Solomonic he’s the best tenant ever and nobody else would want to live in the house.”

“It turns out, he has a point. When Solomonic inspected his property in April, he noticed his renter had raised his bed 6 feet off the ground on wooden risers. That was odd. Odd but necessary, because of fleas. And the fleas dominated the place because the renter was in the habit of leaving all his windows open and feeding and providing litter boxes for neighborhood’s stray cats.”

“The renter works in construction. In the yard, he had trash from construction sites piled taller than a normal-sized man. Two refrigerators, wood scraps, corrugated metal. All at the house for which the renter hasn’t paid rent since March. In Bexar County, landlords could not file eviction notices until after July 25. Solomonic sent an eviction notice the next day via certified mail. He also sent information, required by law, on where his renter could get additional resources if needed. On Aug. 15, Solomonic requested a court hearing, which happened on Sept. 18. The tenant didn’t show up. After six months of no rent, Solomonic now has a writ of possession, and his tenant has been ordered to vacate the property.”

“Sure, landlords and mortgage lenders tend to have more resources than renters and borrowers. But landlords also need a way to protect their assets, right? To go back to where I started, I think that when eviction and foreclosures begin to happen again, we will see that uptick in bankruptcy filings absent the first part of the year. For future contributions to his retirement nest egg, I reminded Solomonic about stock index funds. Stock mutual funds don’t attract fleas, and they don’t require eviction filings in court.”

This Post Has 229 Comments
  1. ‘he noticed his renter had raised his bed 6 feet off the ground on wooden risers. That was odd. Odd but necessary, because of fleas. And the fleas dominated the place’

    It doesn’t freeze that far south, so fleas can multiply to an unbelievable number.

    ‘Spin it however you’d like folks, but the bottom line is that there’s a lot more homes to discover in our local market if you’re looking to buy…we saw the number of Just Reduced homes jump by nearly (you guessed it) 20 percent during the last week, too’

    Eat yer crowz taxpayer.

    1. “…lot more homes to discover in our local market if you’re looking to buy…”

      Large sticky note to sellers: As the HBB and readers have repeatedly stated for the last 10 years+, if you want to sell your house, then price it to the market. Works like magic every time. Most sellers will take a bath. Get over it.

      1. A relative had to move right after the previous crash. He put his house on the market and it sat. I Told him to undercut everyone else who was selling. He did and presto, he got an offer, which he accepted even though he was convinced he was leaving money on the table. Later, as prices dropped even more, he grudgingly admitted he made the right move.

  2. ‘These are some of things prospective tenants are being offered right now, particularly in new-construction apartment complexes in San Francisco, as developers and landlords are getting desperate to fill vacancies. As the SF Business Times reports this week, 40 percent of SF landlords have had tenants unexpectedly break leases since March’

    ‘And in SoMa, where rents soared in the last decade in new-construction towers and low-rise complexes, large swaths of units are sitting empty’

    That’s some shortage UHS. I’m starting to think somebody is a lion.

  3. ‘ with 30 percent of the homes on the market in San Francisco having been reduced at least once, which is 17 percentage points, or 130 percent, higher than at the same time last year, the number of reduced listings has increased 19 percent over the past month in the absolute to a new 9-year high’

    Eat yer crowz too Thornberg.

  4. ‘In a pivot from prior months, CHIP Executive Director Jay Martin said the trade group has stopped expecting the federal government to step in, and that the industry is now looking toward local policymakers for help’

    That’s good Jay, but yer still fooked.

    1. That’s good Jay, but yer still fooked.

      He sure is. All those “local policymakers” are even more broke than than those hoping for help.

        1. But the city will likely continue their health benefits, so it’s a good time to hit the library for some good titles.

          1. Yes! He is 11 months and walking everywhere! Super busy as company had a hiring freeze so no backfill for my co worker who left in Dec 2019. Basically been doing the work of 2 for some time now. We should hire a replacement soon!

          2. 11 months

            My son’s now school aide, former ABA therapist, had a baby girl about the same time so that’s how I remember.

  5. Regardless of what your home search may comprise, now is a great time to explore and, if you’re ready to commit, negotiate.”

    Nah. I’m going to sit tight and wait for the implosion of the Fed’s Everything Bubble. Anyone who buys a shack before then is a moron.

  6. Arlington?

    Oooooph….

    Arlington, Va Housing Prices Crater 27% YOY As Double Digit Price Declines And Soaring Mortgage Defaults Envelop Northern Virginia

    https://www.movoto.com/arlington-va/market-trends/

    As one Arlington County broker lamented, “How can we possibly sell a resale house when builders are selling new houses on the same street for 20% and sometimes 30% less?”

  7. ‘the now-troubled rental market is even more adversely affected in neighborhoods traditionally populated by students. ‘Across the board we are seeing rents softening but, clearly, college areas are showing the highest decreases — every college neighborhood in Boston saw decreases from February’

    Recession proof!

    1. It’s different in Arlington. Most of those listings are probably speculators who were banking on Amazon HQ 2 to make a quick buck. They finally figured out that those thousands of six-figure jobs aren’t coming tomorrow, and with COVID, they may never. So they need to list.

      I wouldn’t worry about taxpayers. He’s in defense contractor land.

      1. You’ve been here a long time, Oxide. I expect a scientist, even one employed by the government, to understand by now that prices are set at the margin.

    1. Cratering? The stock price is still near all time highs. It needs to fall something like 95% to even be realistic.

      1. Probably not a wise move right now. Note that the announcement is coming from China state-affiliated media.

        https://twitter.com/globaltimesnews/status/1308799026205044737: US electric carmaker #Tesla has filed lawsuit to block the US govt’s from imposing new tariffs on imports from China and seek an order declaring the duties unlawful and a refund with interest of what it has already paid: report. (File Photo)

  8. And yet the stock market casino is rolling along Wayfair from 21-almost 350 Carvana from 22-220 shopify hit 950…..damn i wish i wasn’t so responsible with money I could be livin the dream on a tropical isle

    1. My well-paid friends are all gambling in houses and stocks. One of them was able to pay off his new house (which he grossly overpaid for) with his Tesla stock windfall. There’s nothing I can say. I look like the fool with my paltry savings getting wiped out by the FED.

      1. “My well-paid friends are all gambling in hou$es and $tocks.”

        $avings = $ucker
        Free $tock purcha$es = hip$ter
        $1,000,086.00 @ 1.86% $helter.$hack.loan$ with just x3 click$!

        lotto ticket$ are cheap …

  9. Inventory levels are now running 90 percent higher on a year-over-year basis, 200 percent higher than in September of 2015, and roughly 20 percent higher than during the Great Recession.

    Is that a lot?

  10. “Justin Solomonic, 40, owns four rental units that constitute his main nest egg for retirement. He’s an IT professional in San Antonio. He built up savings, which he plowed into these four units. He estimates he’s collected just 40 percent of his rents since the pandemic began. Most of the lost income stems from a single tenant, who has not made a rental payment since March. Reminders to pay rent mostly are met with shouting. Or gaslighting, in which the tenant tries to convince Solomonic he’s the best tenant ever and nobody else would want to live in the house.”

    When I was a renter I always carried renter’s insurance, which had a clause that said they’d pay for a hotel room if I couldn’t access my rental residence for some reason like the recent fires, flooding, etc., but I can’t recall any health disaster language.

    1. Justin may need to adjust his retirement expectations, to include living in close proximity to a food bank and Goodwill.

    2. Reminders to pay rent mostly are met with shouting. Or gaslighting, in which the tenant tries to convince Solomonic he’s the best tenant ever and nobody else would want to live in the house.”

      This landlord better be careful. The deadbeat might decide to become an artist and take up indoor oil painting, or decide to start breeding large animals. The associated mess could cost him in the tens of thousands.

  11. The Cult of Ruth is hitting retch-worthy levels as this Constitution-hating collectivist hag is being laid in Lenin-like repose for a display of vicarious grief that would do Kim Jung-Un proud. Right now Marketwatch is featuring a fawning look at her childhood home in Brooklyn, as if it’s some kind of shrine.

    1. The Second Amendment is part of the Constitution. Abortion and Obamacare are not. Amy Coney Barrett will make a fine Justice and hopefully serve for decades.

      The millions of black babies aborted since the Roe decision in 1973 are lives that do not “matter.”

      1. ‘New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo writing in the Daily News, Feb. 15, 2016: “Justice Scalia believed first and foremost in the Constitution of the United States. . . . Nowhere in the Constitution does it say the President or the U.S. Senate should put aside these responsibilities because of politics or a presidential election, and we cannot let partisan bickering cripple the nation’s highest court.”

        “Washington gridlock has already succeeded in largely immobilizing the legislative and executive branches of our federal government. To allow it to now paralyze the judicial branch, in defiance of the U.S. Constitution, would be a disservice to both parties and to Justice Scalia’s legacy.”

        https://www.wsj.com/articles/notable-quotable-gov-cuomo-on-a-supreme-court-vacancy-11600729787

        1. From the comments: “I seriously doubt that Cuomo believes that today. He does not believe in anything for more than one election cycle. His zeal for post natal abortions and euthanizing senior citizens goes against taking the risk of allowing a conservative justice to replace Justice Ginsburg.”

          Here’s an, “all bases loaded, out of the park, home run!”

      2. The Second Amendment is part of the Constitution.

        Without the Second Amendment, the rest of the Constitution isn’t worth the paper its written on, especially when collectivist crones try to engage in revisionist history and pretend the right to bear arms isn’t the Founding Fathers’ ultimate safeguard and check against government overreach and would-be tyrants.

        She [RBG] continues, “The Second Amendment has a preamble about the need for a militia…Historically, the new government had no money to pay for an army, so they relied on the state militias. And the states required men to have certain weapons and they specified in the law what weapons these people had to keep in their home so that when they were called to do service as militiamen, they would have them. <strong.That was the entire purpose of the Second Amendment."

        But, Justice Ginsburg explains, “When we no longer need people to keep muskets in their home, then the Second Amendment has no function, its function is to enable the young nation to have people who will fight for it to have weapons that those soldiers will own. So I view the Second Amendment as rooted in the time totally allied to the need to support a militia. So…the Second Amendment is outdated in the sense that its function has become obsolete.”

        As for the Heller case, decided by the Court in 2008, Justice Ginsburg says, “If the Court had properly interpreted the Second Amendment, the Court would have said that amendment was very important when the nation was new; it gave a qualified right to keep and bear arms, but it was for one purpose only—and that was the purpose of having militiamen who were able to fight to preserve the nation.”

          1. Like they’re the only one’s who believe in personal liberty. Did I miss something? I thought conservatives believed in the right of individuals to be free from government intrusion.

          2. “Margaret Sanger (1879 – 1966) was the founder of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). As an activist in the birth-control and population-control movements, she was one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century.

            Many questions have been raised concerning her real views on eugenics, race, and human rights, and it is hard to separate the facts from fiction. The information presented here is drawn directly from her writings, with references.
            Sanger’s obsession with eugenics and racism was clearly presented in her involvement of planning the First World Population Conference which took place in Geneva in 1926. She was not mentioned on the actual program, but instead worked behind the scenes and initiated the “Negro Project” in 1939.

            The objective of the “project” was to infiltrate the black community by presenting birth control as a health option for women to kill off the black race. Kill them off by limiting the growth of the population by abortion and sterilization.”

            http://www.nationalblackprolifeunion.com/Margaret-Sanger-and-The-Negro-Project.html

        1. do or don’t do with their bodies

          Short version: If she’s pregnant, one could argue that it’s not really her body. I’m not saying that’s my view, but that is the view from the anti-abortion movement.

          1. “If she’s pregnant, one could argue that it’s not really her body.”

            And IIRC, Roe v. Wade took the nuanced view that whether a fetus was viable independent of the mother’s body was a relevant factor in determining when abortion is legal. Thirty seconds after a sperm enters an egg is not enough time for a viable fetus to develop.

            Not to suggest those who want to turn back the clock to 1972 aren’t masters of scientific nuance, but it seems like the very careful thought that went into the Roe v. Wade decision makes it difficult to overturn, regardless of the ceasesless rantings of the Right to Life tribe.

          2. makes it difficult to overturn

            For any issue, the Supreme Court has to wait for a case to come before it. People getting wound up and tied in knots over this particular issue probably don’t realize this.

        2. Don’t you think that argument is at least *somewhat* weak? I mean, you can’t stop feeding your birthed children and let them starve since they are leeching off you.. There is at LEAST room for discussion on the “full body autonomy” line of reasoning.

          I mean.. even when somebody fully punches you in the face.. you still can’t just murder them. We have legally encoded proportional responses to bodily autonomy. Further.. when you are being arrested, you DON’T have bodily autonomy. Also if you are drafted into military service. There are clear cases where some public good trumps your bodily autonomy.

          So the very least thing we have to do is argue at a more nuanced level than bodily autonomy, otherwise the argument is simply fail.

          1. you can’t stop feeding your birthed children and let them starve

            Sure you can. In fact, every woman who has died in childbirth has done exactly that. Wet nurses have been around for centuries.

        3. Why do you care what black women do or don’t do with their bodies?

          I don’t know what “black” has to do with any rights. Are you talking about tattoos or infanticide?

      3. rebuttal probably 75% would have no father in the home, and the consequences of that would be far more devastating then what we have today.

        1. I understand you’re playing devil’s advocate but that rebuttal is ridiculous. There are plenty of other birth control methods.

          1. Yes but they dont use them, I have been with women who had abortions, and my take is the other half was never going to be man enough to be fathers, so women must have the right to choose

          2. right to choose

            When the medical procedure is modified to preserve the viability of parts for subsequent sale, it has more to do with profitability than the right to choose. That profitability feeds the Democrat machine.

      4. Amy Coney Barrett will make a fine Justice and hopefully serve for decades.

        She’s quite possibly another John Roberts in waiting. Rushing or Lagoa would be safer. Rushing is the best and she’s only 38 years old.

        1. She’s quite possibly another John Roberts in waiting.

          Because of the adoptions or Epstein’s flight logs?

          1. No, because the “bonafides” aren’t as reliable as they seem to be.

            Candidates who have a supreme court agenda often camouflage who they really are. They know what certain people are looking for in a prospective justice and present as such.

            It would take too long to hash out everything here. Google won’t be honest, so if you’re interested go to duckduckgo and look for the comparisons and then check for the ones that caution against Barrett. See if they make sense to you. She might be great, but the chances are very high that she’s not.

      5. Roe decision in 1973

        IIRC (it’s been 20 years since law school) Roe v. Wade protects a woman’s “right to choose” in the first trimester (13 weeks). Viability also played a crucial role in the decision. With scientific advancements, viability has shifted since that time. Do most women today realize any of this? Probably not.

        1. I tried to point this out above in my response to Oxide. Being a law school graduate, you said it better. (In full disclosure, I did recently help advise one of my sons on a college term paper he wrote about the Roe v. Wade decision…)

    2. Maybe they can pull St. Floyd out of storage and have him as an opening act for Ruth as her decaying corpse is toured around the country. Their pet orcs are always kept close (and on a leash) in real life, why not in death too?

  12. San Diego home sales prices appear to be rising parabolically, having increased by almost 10% from May to August. This is thanks, no doubt, to foreclosure moratoriums helping to limit inventory plus low interest rates coupled with subprime underwriting standards to goose demand.

    It will be interesting to see how far this parabolic spike will run up before it collapses.

    1. Poway inventory is so low single-story homes between $1-1.5M are selling above listing price. Encinitas inventory appears to be increasing but with my transaction closing on Friday I finally turned off notifications from Zillow and Realtor.com for those.

    2. …with subprime underwriting standards to goose demand.

      When I hear “goose demand,” it’s like nails on a chalkboard to me. I just despise that term. I suppose it’s because I despise the FED and their intentions, and “goosing” something isn’t natural at all. But again, the term is just nauseating. It’s along the lines of “the elites.”

          1. Leda was a princess in Greek mythology, daughter of the king of Aetolia, Thestius. She was the wife of King Tyndareus of Sparta.

            When Zeus saw her, he fell in love with her. He transformed into a swan and appeared in front of her; he seduced her and slept with her. On that night, Leda also lay with her husband. As a result, she became impregnated by both Zeus and Tyndareus. From two eggs, two sets of twins were born; the first set was Helen and Clytemnestra; and the other was Castor and Pollux. In the various myths, it is inconsistent who were the children of Zeus and who were of Tyndareus. All myths agree though that Pollux was immortal, and that Helen was Zeus’ daughter. Leda’s other children by Tyndareus were Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe.

          2. I’m totally lost

            The worst joke is the joke explained.

            Mythical Leda got raped by a swan. She sorta got “goosed”.

          3. “I have to admit that’s over my head.”

            Leda was the precipitant. This experiment identified the precipitate, a formal education. Sorry!

    3. “It will be interesting to see how far this parabolic spike will run up before it collapses.“

      Long as they keep the beer flu fear agenda going all the sheeple will be willing to overpay and borrow beyond their comfort levels to “secure” a shack they consider necessary and comforting. Wait tell the printing press breaks and the free cheese disappears!

      1. I was trying to, but couldn’t find a good way to do it. Yeah, this is about sexi-trux, but it could as well apply to Benz’n’Beem sexi-luxe.

    1. There were 13.2 million new pickups sold from 2013 to 2019 in the U.S., with monthly payments of as much as $1,300 for each.

      Mind-blowing. I recall an article within the past 5 months where an old-timer and manager at a lumber mill who was retiring said that almost every young man working there had a brand new diesel 4×4 truck, and that they all stopped making the payments around the same time. And they stopped paying rents/mortgages, too. This stuff is insanity.

      “The Denton, Texas, couple pay $4,400 a month on their mortgage, four car loans and leases, and student debt, Ms. Scott-White said. Minimum required monthly credit-card payments total about $700. The debt was manageable pre-pandemic, she said.

      “She deferred lease payments on her Infiniti QX60 for three months and started paying again with unemployment benefits. Her husband traded in his Ford F-150 in August for a lower-cost car and reduced his original monthly payment of $820 by about $100, and his income covers the $2,100 mortgage.”

      Remember the meme last recession that millennials eschewed debt and were competing to see who could get through life spending the least amount of money possible? In fact, the msm used to post stories of young millennials who would see how many days they could go without spending even a dollar. That sure proved to be a bunch of bullsh!t. These idiots are the biggest debt-junkies the USA has ever seen.

    2. I have never paid more than $12,000 to buy a vehicle. And before all the pickup drivers get salty, my foreman drives a F-150, any jobsite materials that can’t get carried in that are delivered. I get 36 miles per gallon highway and only need to carry a trunk full of tools.

      Spendy SUV’s and modified high-clearance mountain “toys” derail retirement savings just as much as overpriced pickups.

      1. Electricians are lucky in that they use a lot of hand tools and smaller power tools, not huge saws and things. You still need ladders, though. If you go out on your own you’ll need a van.

        1. He could probably carry everything, ladder included, in an old, inexpensive Nissan Frontier. No need to buy an F-350 diesel.

      2. Spending tens of thousands of dollars on a vehicle is insane. I’ve never paid more the $3,800 for a car or truck. I paid $2,000 for my 2006 Prius two years ago. Hoping to get another three or four years out of it (i.e. 350,000 miles).

    3. “The Denton, Texas, couple pay $4,400 a month on their mortgage, four car loans and leases, and student debt, Ms. Scott-White said. Minimum required monthly credit-card payments total about $700. The debt was manageable pre-pandemic, she said.”

      Realistically, the interest was manageable.

      1. I’m pretty sure their numbers are BS. Only $4400 for a mortgage, four car loans and leases, and student debt? The mortgage itself is $2200, one truck payment $800…all the remaining 3 car loans/leases plus student debt only added up to $1400?

        Somebody’s a lion. Their monthly nut was way higher than this.

  13. Are you a true believer in the predictive power of reading the stock market’s tea leaves?

    I’m a true doubter.

    1. In One Chart
      This ‘stunning and shocking’ chart has one Wall Street strategist worried about the stock market’s next move
      Last Updated: Sept. 23, 2020 at 11:19 a.m. ET
      First Published: Sept. 23, 2020 at 11:13 a.m. ET
      By Shawn Langlois
      Referenced Symbols
      NDX
      -1.42%
      COMP
      -1.21%
      SPX
      -0.73%
      DJIA
      -0.42%

      Some of us are old enough to remember the maniacal buying that pushed tech stocks, many of them long since dead and gone, to nosebleed valuations back in the heady dot-com bubble days of 1999.

      Is history repeating itself? Check out this chart, courtesy of Mott Capital’s Michael Kramer, comparing the Nasdaq-100 (NDX, -1.42%) back then to the same tech-heavy index today:

      “I found this to be stunning and shocking,” Kramer told investors in a blog post. “I hope this turns out to be wrong, by the way.” More than just the chart, the numbers he highlighted this week mirror the action in 1999 almost exactly.

      From the March 2020 coronavirus-induced lows, the Nasdaq-100 jumped 84% over 163 days. Dial it back a couple decades, and the index rose about 86% over 151 days. The reasons for the explosive rally may be vastly different, but the paths are, indeed, strikingly similar.

      “I don’t know, maybe it is just chance, but still awfully strange,” Kramer wrote. “I guess we are going to find out soon whether the similarities end there.”

      No sign Wednesday of that last leg of the chart matching up, though the Nasdaq Composite (COMP, -1.21%) was slightly lower, as was the S&P 500 (SPX, -0.73%). The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA, -0.42%), however, was in the green.

        1. It seems so very unfair…Barstool Dave and his braindead band of Millennial day trader disciples seem to have no clue about what long-term Treasurys are or why you might want to own them at a point like right now, when risk assets are in slow-motion crater mode.

  14. “In a pivot from prior months, CHIP Executive Director Jay Martin said the trade group has stopped expecting the federal government to step in, and that the industry is now looking toward local policymakers for help. ‘City and State leaders must take steps to stop the bleeding and stabilize the affordable housing ecosystem for both tenants and their housing providers,’ he said in a statement.”

    After all, the federal government, the City of New York, and the State of New York are flush with cash, right?

    1. ‘City and State leaders must take steps to stop the bleeding and stabilize the affordable housing ecosystem for both tenants and their housing providers,’ he said in a statement.”

      I mean HUH? How is propping up prices “stabilizing the affordable housing ecosystem?” The fawking clowns are idiots.

      1. I think they mean the ecosystem that gives them nice paychecks. After all, we can’t expect them to get a productive job when there’s public monies to administer.

    1. Nuisance will be long gone by 2035. Should allow for ample time to cancel his move to limit CA POVs to EVs and bicycles.

    2. California can’t handle the power demands now. Imagine millions of electric cars needing a charge. Rolling blackouts will have new meaning.

        1. recharge at night

          By then we’ll have AMAZING, Middle East peace-making batteries from Tesla and QuantumScape!!

          1. I kid you not. I was listening to Coffee with Scott Adams yesterday and he credited Elon Musk with peace in the Middle East because of Tesla’s battery technology, which is nonexistent. Scott has an MBA from UC Berkeley. He lost any and all credibility after he said that.

          2. That’s all I ever need to hear

            Stereotypes are stereotypes for a reason although I do try to see beyond them.

  15. I hear an announcement is coming that the the federal debt is going to increase by at least 15 percent of GDP every year for the next 20 years, and that interest rates will be kept at zero that entire time, in order to ensure stock investors that global businesses will still be able to sell to impoverished Americans.

    Or something like that, in order to use the bazooka.

    1. “…that the the federal debt is going to increase by at least 15 percent of GDP every year for the next 20 years, and that interest rates will be kept at zero that entire time…”

      Don’t worry, be happy.

      That’s why they invented computers with 64-bit address datums.

      Perfect to handle the accounting for quadrillion, quintrillion, sextillion, septillion, octillion, nonillion, and decillion

      Eat your hearts out Zimbabwe!

      1. This is bad for people in cold areas… can’t burn digital money to keep warm. On the plus side, the cold areas are warming up a bit.

    2. I took a couple of courses at Haas, and agree that it has world class programs. And to date myself, Janet Yellen was dean when I was a student.

      1. Wow, on both counts!

        FWIW, I have a niece there right now, freshman year. She’s all jazzed with the campus’ historic events, Sproul Plaza, etc., too bad they’re online. She signed a lease at some housing complex, so she’s Stucco…and hopefully learning a lesson too.

  16. I have saved a few hundred zillow listings throughout the west, so I get email when they drop price or sell. Up until this week, its been sale sale sale, but now it’s drop drop drop.

    A pretty short sampling, but it was very abrupt.

    1. A bunch of empty lots in El Dorado Hills above Folsom just went down significantly in price. They went below 200k a while ago looking for bites and now are in the 125k range. I like where this is going.

      1. I’ve been seeing cuts of about 10%, with the occasional 100k jaw dropper. The herd smells something it doesn’t like.

  17. Now wait which is it? Has the bubble burst or is it enlarging?
    On one side the housing market is headed for an abyss and on the other side The National Association of Realtors reports an Annualized Sales Rate of 6 Million in August, the highest since December of 2006.I know realtors are the devil in human form but still the numbers inflate and then deflate like an old wind bag. My hope is that many of the esteemed raconteurs on this blog will balance me on this see saw of a ride.

    1. The Financial Times
      Markets Briefing Equities
      US stocks fall after Fed officials warn on stimulus
      Tech shares lead the market lower as equities drop for the fifth time in six sessions
      A fall in Tesla shares dragged down the Nasdaq Composite
      © Bloomberg
      Colby Smith in New York, Naomi Rovnick and Camilla Hodgson in London an hour ago

      US stocks dropped on Wednesday, led by technology shares, after Federal Reserve officials highlighted the need for Congress to agree on a new round of stimulus to support the economic recovery.

      The S&P 500 lost 2.4 per cent in a reversal that accelerated toward the close, marking its fifth down day in six trading sessions. The benchmark is now more than 9 per cent off of its record high in August.

      The Nasdaq Composite fell 3 per cent, bringing its losses to about 12 per cent since August. Tesla slid 10 per cent after the electric vehicle maker’s founder Elon Musk pledged to halve the cost of the cars’ batteries but also warned of “the extreme difficulty of scaling production of new technology”. Apple and Google parent Alphabet each lost more than 3 per cent.

      Stocks retreated as Fed officials used a series of public appearances to make the case for additional fiscal stimulus in the US.

      Jay Powell, the Fed chairman, argued for Congress to do more to support the recovery, on top of the series of relief packages passed early in the pandemic, as did Charles Evans, Chicago Fed president. Richard Clarida, the Fed vice-chairman, told Bloomberg Television that “the economy is recovering robustly, but we are still in a deep hole”.

      “When you hear that from the raft of Fed speakers, particularly from the top, it is of concern,” said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist for Prudential Financial.

      Krishna Guha, vice-chairman at Evercore ISI, said the Fed’s “increasingly shrill calls” for more fiscal support were “shaking confidence in the outlook given near-certainty that this additional fiscal support will not be forthcoming before January at the earliest”.

        1. This is by far the worst period for professional entertainers of all varieties since I set foot on the planet decades ago.

          1. “worst period for professional entertainers”

            awe Pshaw, read how Cat Stevens came to write most of his icon hit$.

            Have faith dear professor, all i$ knot lo$t!

          2. Tuberculosis:
            Stevens contracted tuberculosis in 1969 and was close to death at the time of his admittance to the King Edward VII Hospital, Midhurst, West Sussex. He spent months recuperating in the hospital and a year of convalescence. During this time Stevens began to question aspects of his life and spirituality. He later said, “to go from the show business environment and find you are in hospital, getting injections day in and day out, and people around you are dying, it certainly changes your perspective. I got down to thinking about myself. It seemed almost as if I had my eyes shut.”

            He took up meditation, yoga, and metaphysics; read about other religions; and became a vegetarian. As a result of his serious illness and long convalescence, and as a part of his spiritual awakening and questioning, he wrote as many as 40 songs, many of which would appear on his albums in years to come.

            Good thing President $hrub, kept him from coming from England to “pure” American on an aeroplane!

            Denial of entry into the United States:

            On 21 September 2004, Islam was on a United Airlines flight from London to Washington, travelling to a meeting with US entertainer Dolly Parton, who had recorded “Peace Train” several years earlier and was planning to include another Cat Stevens song on an upcoming album. While the plane was in flight, his name was flagged as being on the No Fly List. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers alerted the United States Transportation Security Administration, which then diverted his flight to Bangor, Maine, where he was detained by officers from the Department of Homeland Security.

            The following day, he was denied entry and flown back to the United Kingdom. A spokesman for Homeland Security claimed there were “concerns of ties he may have to potential terrorist-related activities”. The Israeli government had deported Islam in 2000 over allegation$ that he provided funding to the Palestinian organisation Hamas, but he denied doing so knowingly.

            ( what does @realJesus, teach about .fal$e accusation$)

            Islam stated “I have never knowingly supported or given money to Hamas”. “At the time I was reported to have done it, I didn’t know such a group existed. Some people give a political interpretation to charity. We were horrified at how people were suffering in the Holy Land.”

          3. I’m losing no faith personally. I view this period as both a crucible and an incubation period for arts and entertainment, like a wildfire burning through an old grove sequoia stand, enabling the seeds of tomorrow’s giants to germinate and take root. Those who invest their time and talents wisely will be well positioned to participate in a great flowering of the performing arts after COVID-19 is done with us.

            However, the hardships on those who until February 2020 were heavily dependent on performing opportunities for their livelihoods is considerable. Other than for politicians in office…

          4. “thee hardship$ on those who until February 2020 were heavily dependent on performing opportunitie$ for their livelihood$ is con$iderable.”

            Ye$, this i$ a truei$m! (Eye am a lover of ALL music, especially, Blue.grass/folk/rock.n.roll.babe!)

            $uffering i$ $evere true!, do you think thee.🍊.jesus & $teven Munchin will find a mean$ to distribute $ome of thee x$13+ Trillion$ of Federal.Reserve.Monie$ to these $uffering mu$icals $ouls? … Or I$ Wall.Street$.thee.focu$ of U$A taxpayer$ $upportive “help.me.eye.need$.it.NOW!.to.knot.bee.a Zombie.$ufferagette.Corpooration?” Thee.end $olution?

      1. Kudlow is blah,blah, blahing: “We don’t need another 💉 Muliti-Trillion$ 💲💰💵 💲💰💵 💲💰💵 💲💰💵 💲💰💵 💲💰💵 💲💰💵$timulus!”

        He better look twice before he steps off the White.House curb to avoid being run over bye thee.🍊.jesus circulating diesel/non.ethanol bus!

    2. Witch.way i$ ye betting? 📈📈📈 … 📉📉📉📉

      Monie$ made i$ rather fluid & $ubject to un$een hydraulic (liquidity) pre$$ure$.

    1. 17 year old “Kid” should’ve stayed safe @ Dad’s & Mom’s home.sweet.home, …

      The more organized groups, which include more established ones like the Three Percenters and the Oath Keepers as well as regional organizations, have ideologies that extend far beyond recent events.

      “I think the NRA and other Second Amendment absolutists have been remarkably successful over the last several decades at sort of just convincing people that the Second Amendment protects private militia activity, especially in open carry states,” McCord says, referring to statutes that allow residents to openly carry firearms in public and in some cases permit the display of long guns like semi-automatic rifles.

      The line between a citizen legally carrying a weapon in public and what constitutes illegal paramilitary action, therefore, often goes unrecognized by law enforcement.

      In 2008, the Supreme Court ruled in a major gun rights case, District of Columbia vs. Heller, that citizens had a right to own a firearm for purposes other than being in a militia, namely for self-defense. The ruling affirmed the right of states to restrict militia-like activity.

      “There’s lots of things that are still gray areas when it comes to protecting Second Amendment activity, like certain types of firearms and things like that. But one thing that has been pretty clear that the Second Amendment does not protect is private paramilitary organizations,” McCord

      Regardless of their motivations, the presence of armed actors at recent demonstrations has generally led to a similar outcome: escalation.

      “The main effect has been to make everything worse,” says Pitcavage, the researcher at the Anti-Defamation League. “It just makes everything into a tinderbox.”

      The presence of armed militia groups – even under the pretense of maintaining order and protecting the community – is seen as a tool of intimidation and a way to chill free speech. It also encourages racial justice protesters and other demonstrators to bring their own weapons to already-tense

      The legal team for the accused Kenosha shooter, Kyle Rittenhouse, has hinted that it plans to fight the 17-year-old’s gun-possession charge by arguing that he was acting in self-defense and is part of a militia protected by the Second Amendment.

      Militia groups have for years argued that their actions are constitutionally protected. But legal analysts say the Constitution does not protect private military groups that are unconnected to or outside the authority of the government. In fact, all 50 states prohibit and restrict private militia groups and militia activity with several different kinds of laws as well as provisions included in most state constitutions.

      “What we’re seeing in the kinds of militias that we see today, these sort of self-appointed militias that have no relationship with the state government whatsoever, no authority to speak for the state or for the people of the state, these are not the kinds of militias that are referenced by the Second Amendment.

        1. Patience, my lil’ Patawan

          “source” is … awaiting moderation.

          Mr. Ben has life beyond this HB.B blog!

      1. 17 year old “Kid”

        He’s to be tried as an adult.

        Doesn’t look like he was part of a radical criminal gang. Nice try though.

        1. “a radical criminal gang.”

          Suspect parenting or reckless disregard towards the one’s who care about you.

          (would love to see the parents thoughts on his actions) …Oh, maybe the “Dad” has gone missing?

          Before the deadly shooting, Rittenhouse lived with his mother, Wendy Rittenhouse, a single mom and nurse’s assistant, in a quiet apartment complex beside a park in Antioch, a bedroom community that sits just south of the Wisconsin border.

          According to court records reviewed by the Chicago Tribune, Wendy Rittenhouse sought an order of protection from police in January 2017, claiming that a classmate of her son’s had been threatening him and calling him “dumb” and “stupid.”

          (Sounds like bullying may have been focused on him, Ms. Melania knot would like that!)

          Jim McKay, the superintendent for the school district that includes Antioch, said in a statement to The Post that Rittenhouse attended Lakes Community High School for a semester in the 2017-18 school year and did not re-enroll in either local high school afterward. Two unnamed neighbors told the Chicago Sun-Times that he had dropped out of Lakes.

          Outside school, Rittenhouse participated in cadet programs with both the Antioch Fire Department and the Grayslake Police Department, according to department newsletters. The police initiative offers participants from ages 14 to 21 “the opportunity to explore a career in law enforcement” through ride-alongs with officers on patrol and firearms training, according to since-deleted pages on its website.

          Philip L. Perlini, the Grayslake police chief, declined to comment to The Post but said his agency was cooperating with an investigation by the FBI and Kenosha police.

          More recently, Rittenhouse worked as a part-time lifeguard at a YMCA in Lindenhurst, Ill., the Tribune reported. Man-Yan Lee, a representative for the organization’s metro Chicago branch, said in a statement to The Post that Rittenhouse was furloughed in March.

          A few weeks earlier, he attended a Trump rally in Des Moines, sitting in the front row and posting a TikTok video from the Jan. 30 event, BuzzFeed News reported. The video, which has since been deleted, appeared to match C-SPAN footage of Rittenhouse standing just to the left of the lectern, according to the news site.

          The Trump campaign distanced itself from Rittenhouse and his video late on Wednesday, with spokesman Tim Murtaugh telling The Post that the president had “repeatedly and consistently condemned all forms of violence.”

        1. From his attorneys.

          Yep, clear and concise. A good deeds volunteer earlier in the day and protector of property later on. The only thing missing…protecting the virtue of a damsel in distress.

    2. Thee 1$t commenter:

      enkimilesius
      being chased by a horde of nogs and jewish pedophile felons.
      They call us “Nazis”. It leaves me wondering, were Nazis simply working class men, who had high IQ’s and preferred civilization over hell?

      Left.out: “white.working.cla-$$men”

      They thank you for giving “them” a credible voice! 👏

      1. That’s what happens when you don’t moderate. I know, I had a forum once remember? It brings up the larger point: why can only site like bitchute host this video? There’s nothing controversial about it. So why has big tech banned it, again? But they promote any sort of hatred and lies toward this kid.

  18. I don’t know if this is a direct result of me, but HR just sent out a new company-wide policy that as of October 1st they expect anyone to be able to come into the office that day if requested. My trip will be wound up on the 2nd so I’m not worried about it, but it might require a job change to do it again. I suspected it might be a once in a lifetime opportunity when I took it.

      1. It depends. If you do good work and are the keeper of essential tribal knowledge, the layoff monster will pass you by. If you’re a known slacker and relatively easy to replace, then watch out.

        1. I started as essential and worked my way to slacker, until I was finally cut at 65.

          Worked out perfectly. 😛

        2. “It depends. If you do good work and are the keeper of essential tribal knowledge, the layoff monster will pass you by. If you’re a known slacker and relatively easy to replace, then watch out.”

          Great advice.

    1. “…as of October 1st they expect anyone to be able to come into the office that day if requested.”

      An emotional response, a short leash.

      1. I disagree. It’s an appropriate response from an employer who realizes they are paying somebody who isn’t even available to come into the office if they need them.

        1. Depends, are the employees classified as “standby” or “on-call?” There’s a huge difference that naive managers like to ignore.

        2. It’s an appropriate response from an employer who realizes they are paying somebody who isn’t even available to come into the office if they need them.

          I was originally told I could “work from anywhere” until told otherwise. Now I’ve been told otherwise. I may be at the top (bottom?) of the layoff list/totem pole but if so it’s because I don’t have anything critical they need, not because of this.

        3. Some jobs clearly require physical proximity, but I take the impression that Carl’s doesn’t.

          I have a colleague at work whose wife’s military career has taken them all over the West in recent years. After much negotiation, he worked out a deal with management where he comes in to work once every couple of weeks in person and otherwise is with his family, or otherwise traveling wherever job duties require.

          Once COVID-19 hit, and everyone was forced to telework, he was way ahead of the game.

    2. I don’t know if this is a direct result of me

      For your sake, I hope you’re not labeled as the guy who ruined it for everybody else. That would really suck!

      1. Right. Carl, any way you can spin it into, “Did you see how I made myself available for a meeting while on vacation?” or has that horse left the barn?

          1. IIUC he was filling out a time sheet as normal. Yeah, he’s in trouble.

            My boss and team lead knew exactly what was going on and were ok with it until the project started getting pressured and people outside the group became aware of what I was doing. I was doing the same thing I’d have been doing at home, which has been my status since March. I just wasn’t available to go in at a moment’s notice.

      2. I hope you’re not labeled as the guy who ruined it for everybody else.

        From their apparent reactions it seemed like nobody else was in a position to take advantage of it. So I don’t think I ruined it for anybody.

    1. Ya know, someone eye love dearly, gets rather upset with myself when eyes refer to Serena Williams as: “thee Screaming.hippo drama.Queen!” … Other than that personal observation, with her “on court” performance$, eye thinks she is terrific person!

  19. “Forgiveness for consumers means pain for landlords. The system we live under requires that people pay for their housing. Sorry, Bernie, but it’s true.”

    Sorry, landlords and lenders, but with Democratic and Republican leaders holding hands and singing Kumbaya over the need for eviction and foreclosure moratoriums, it’s your turn to get thrown under the bus.

    But you have no need to worry, as the occupant of the home you thought was your property will magically come up with the back payments owed plus the new ones, once the pandemic ends.

    In all honesty, lenders to home owners with sufficient equity should have an easy workaround: simply add the missed payments plus interest to the remaining amount owed on the loan and refinance over a sufficiently long future period so the homeowners can afford the monthly. In a few years, when this group of homeowners sells their homes and move on, they may have acumulated just enough equity to repay Nr. Banker the monies owed with interest, leaving the homeowner broke and Mr Banker rolling in Powell bux.

    If a similar happy ending awaits stiffed landlords, then I’m missing it.

    1. But what happens to LLs without any equity? Will there be some sliding scale depending on how much equity? There should probably be a one-step solution. Options:

      1. Gov lends money to the renter, renter pays rent, LL pays mortgage, renter pays back the gov over time. Renter eats the loss.
      2. Gov lends money to the LL, LL pays mortgage, LL pays back the gov over time. LL eats the loss.
      3. Gov lends money to banks, bank pays their own mortgage payments, bank pretends to pay back the gov over time, but in reality are made whole by the Federal Reserve. Nobody eats the loss, but the LL has to fill out a form.

      #1 is the most fair, since the non-payer is the one paying for non-payment. But #3 is most likely. It involves the fewest people, and it’s the least visible to the public. Bankers really like that.

    2. Imagine having your employer stiff you for nearly a year, then tell you they will pay you in 30 years, with interest. Is that fair?

  20. Burn Loot Murder rent-a-mobs were blocking traffic and threatening and assaulting motorists in downtown Denver again last night.

    1. Quite a string of videos from this week here.

      an Miles Cheong
      @stillgray
      Sep 20
      Put your fist up and say Black Lives Matter, or else.

      BLACK LIVES MATTERVideo: Aggressive BLM Agitators Harass Elderly Couple At Restaurant, Threaten To Knock Them ‘The F**k Out’

      24 September, 2020
      Steve Watson

      Aggressive BLM agitators continued their campaign of harassing white people minding their own business at restaurants Wednesday night, this time taking over a couple’s table at an eatery in St. Petersburg, Florida and threatening them with violence.

      The video shows scores of agitators chanting “Stand up, fight back!” outside the restaurant, with several of the troublemakers then deciding to harass the elderly couple.

      When the woman told the lead agitator “This is my table”, and attempted to remove him/her/them/it, she was called a “Karen” and told that the protesters would “knock your old-**s boyfriend the f**k out.”

      https://summit.news/2020/09/24/video-aggressive-blm-agitators-harass-elderly-couple-at-restaurant-threaten-to-knock-them-the-fk-out/

      1. The globalists and their MSM minions must be enraged that each of these raw videos that goes viral on the internet shows the true thuggish face of BLM, not the carefully crafted media image created by the purveyors of The Narrative.

    2. The redeeming value of this is that a higher percentage of Denverites are dyed-in-the-wool libtards. Letting them get up close and personal with what they voted for might be a teachable moment.

    3. Burn Loot Murder rent-a-mobs were blocking traffic and threatening and assaulting motorists in downtown Denver again last night.

      And the only part of it that made the news was that a driver who wasn’t going to wait to be assaulted drove through the crowd, knocking some thugs over in the process.

      https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/protests/breonna-taylor-case-protests-in-denver/73-0f226b45-6d63-4ab7-a95f-3e08bdad644a

      Funny how they never show the thugs thugging.

    1. Some choice comments, like the one below. I don’t know who in their right mind would elect to be a landlord in a blue state where freeloading and parasitism are exalted virtues for the political ruling class.

      Unfortunately, California law is weighted HEAVILY in favor of the scofflaw tenant. I’ve been down this road myself with a sociopathic tenant who never paid a dime in rent the entire six months he lived at my property.

      1. What landlords used to do was make the tenant put all the utilities in their name so if the water electric gas garbage collection was cut off for non payment it would be easier to evict.

    1. In the audio, the Soros operative gets indignant that U-Haul employees evidently leaked internal call logs showing she was the one who rented the truck and that her identity and work in equipping rioters was now all over the Internet. BWHAHAHAHA! Guess you’d counted on being the hidden hand, Holly Zoller not being outed as a cog in the organized destruction of American cities. Better hope Soros picks up the bill to have you moved to an undisclosed location.

        1. When you are told for years in K-12, plus in any post secondary schooling, that you are the problem and the world would be a better place had you never been born … you might believe it.

  21. BREAKING: Ohio Football Mom Tased and Arrested for Not Wearing Mask at a Game

    September 23, 2020
    Jack Windsor

    Alecia Kitts drove an hour and a half from Marietta to Logan, Ohio to watch her son’s football game.

    In the first quarter she was approached by an officer from the Logan Police Department because she was not wearing a mask.

    The video below shows the three-minute encounter between Kitts and the officer.

    According to Tiffany Kennedy, the woman who shot the above video, Kitts had not been warned for not wearing a mask prior to the officer approaching her. Kennedy also said that Kitts has asthma and that’s why she was not wearing a mask.

    “There is no reason to tase someone and arrest them for not wearing a mask,” Kennedy said.

    Kennedy also pointed out the female officer who is shown running toward the Logan officer and Kitts at the end of the video was not wearing a mask – pulling one out of her pocket as she was in pursuit.

    “Alecia’s mom said that when the officer tased her, the current went through the bleachers and zapped the kid sitting there too.”

    Kitts appears to be socially distanced from others in the crowd and sitting with her family. “There were only 25 or 30 fans from our town on our side,” said Kennedy.

    https://theohiostar.com/2020/09/23/breaking-ohio-football-mom-tased-and-arrested-for-not-wearing-mask-at-a-game/

    1. FWIW, I went to Walmart yesterday, and the “direction arrows” on the floor of each aisle were gone as were the greeters doing the headcount thing. We must have passed a health department covid threshold.

      1. Saw the same in one of my Wal-Marts. Nobody had been following the signs anyway. Really I think the masks are doing their job.

        1. Really I think the masks are doing their job.

          Weird, because most of the “masks” I see aren’t even masks, they’re bandanas loosely draped over the mouth, almost never the nose, and amount to a vanity piece.

          1. From what I have observed most are wearing masks. You get a few wearing a kerchief. The only place I’ve seen where someone checks that you’re covering up is WalMart, but seeing someone uncovered is sort of rare in my little burg.

        2. Speaking of nobody following the signs, the worst I’ve seen so far was picking up food in Fayetteville, NC (home of the 82nd Airborne). Signs on the doors saying masks required, not a single customer except me with one on. The staff was making only a token effort and talking over their masks instead of through them. First time I saw staff not caring either.

          1. The local police have been making the rounds trying to get shops to comply.Those that weren’t compliant were encouraged to at least put a policy sign on their door. The car parts sign reads “We’re not wearing masks because we’re practicing social distancing.” Sign on the Barbershop door “We’re not wearing masks because we both have asthma.”

    2. “Why be pugnacious? Just put on the mask or stay home.”

      Here’s another one for you Heinrich.

      Idaho Police Arrest 3 at Outdoor Church Worship Event in Defiance of Mask Mandate

      EZRA DULIS
      24 Sep 2020

      Police in Moscow, Idaho, arrested three people Wednesday for violating social distancing rules as their church sang hymns and Bible psalms outdoors — an event held, in part, to protest the city mayor’s mask mandate, which runs to January 2021.

      Rench is a co-host of CrossPolitic, a Christian political talk show, and a candidate for county commissioner. “You guys should not be doing this,” he told officers as they walked him to a squad car. “And doing this kind of crap for the mayor, this is embarrassing. You guys are stronger than this.”

      https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2020/09/24/idaho-police-arrest-3-at-outdoor-church-worship-event-in-defiance-of-mask-mandate/

      MPD arrest Christians singing outside for “not social distancing.”

      Sep 23, 2020

      https://youtu.be/9uRolZF77nk

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