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The Sky’s The Limit, But That Sky Came Crashing Down

A report from the Real Deal on New York. “In February, billionaire Ken Griffin purchased Calvin Klein’s seven-acre Southampton home for $84 million — the year’s most expensive deal in the Hamptons. Now, the mansion next door has been put on the market for an eye-popping $175 million. Critics question whether the $175 million price tag is realistic. ‘The price is so out of the stratosphere that it’s damaging to the owner and the marketplace,’ said a broker in the Hamptons who asked to remain anonymous. ‘It sends a false pretense of what is possible.'”

The New York Real Estate Journal. “Brooklyn, NY Klosed Properties acquired 285 Quincy St. for $2.5 million. The property is a 21-unit multifamily property located in the heart of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. The property totals 32,000 s/f with large units and a handful of vacant units. ‘We are all uncertain what 2021 will bring, but Klosed Properties is optimistic,’ said Adam Hajibai, vice president of acquisitions. ‘It’s a buyers market and as pricing continues to decline, we expect to see an increase in transaction volume from investors like ourselves.'”

The Laker Lutz News in Florida. “The Pasco County Planning Commission has recommended approval of a change to the county’s comprehensive plan that would allow consideration of up to 400 apartments to be developed on 28.2 acres. Commissioner Peter Hanzel objected. ‘We have an overabundance of apartments in that area. There is no need for another apartment complex out there,’ Hanzel said.”

From Bisnow in Massachusetts. “Boston’s business leaders are at a crossroads as the coronavirus pandemic has dramatically altered their workplaces. A retreat from office buildings has led to historic negative absorption and record-high subleasing availability. Office occupancy rates in downtown’s high-rises sat between 8% and 12% post-Labor Day, with just 4% to 5% of offices occupied by mid-December, according to CBRE. ‘The reality of our space right now [is if] it was not able to adapt, it’s sitting dark right now,’ Gensler Design Director Alfred Byun said.”

From Bisnow Washington DC. “The strategy of converting office buildings to residential has taken off in the suburbs and in some of D.C.’s emerging submarkets, but it has been difficult for developers to make conversion projects work in the city’s central business district. ‘We’ve been asked to look at conversions in downtown more than we ever have,’ said Hickok Cole principal Laurence Caudle, an architect.”

“He said the shift has occurred over the last year. The District’s office market last quarter reached a record-high 15.9% vacancy rate, according to CBRE, and it recorded 1.4M SF of negative absorption last year. ‘There’s concern that commercial office is softening and the net operating income might not be as high as it used to be, particularly in the downtown area,’ he said.”

“‘The net operating income of office downtown has been higher than residential, so it requires a subsidy,’ Downtown D.C. Business Improvement District Director of Economic Development Gerry Widdicombe said. ‘It doesn’t do anybody any good to have a vacant building, whether in Downtown or NoMa or Capitol Riverfront,’ said. ‘The city isn’t maximizing tax revenues. It doesn’t add to the vibrancy of the city, and it’s just sad to see an empty building.'”

The Denver Post in Colorado. “Metro Denver’s housing market defied the odds last year, shattering one record after the other. But two economists warned an online gathering of local Realtors that the surge won’t continue and to temper their expectations for 2021. ‘I have a little bit of bad news. The months of 2020, from August to December — that is as good as it gets. It won’t get better. It is over,’ Elliot Eisenberg told the Denver Metro Association of Realtors’ Economic Summit .”

“Patty Silverstein, the chief economist with Littleton-based Development Research Partners, backed up Eisenberg. Distressed sales and foreclosures could rise significantly from low levels as forbearance plans granted by the CARES Act expire and borrowers look for an exit strategy. She said people may freak out when they see how much foreclosures rise, but the market desperately needs inventory and the surge won’t be detrimental.”

“Silverstein suggested that a cooling in the region’s housing market will prove a good thing for a variety of reasons and told the agents to not ‘go crying home.’ ‘The problem that Denver faces is the cost of housing, it is just expensive,’ Eisenberg said.”

From Eastsider LA in California. “How Low Will They Go? El Sereno condo: $10,000 slice on hilltop 3-bedroom home. Now asking $424,900. Highland Park 3-bedroom: $20,000 reduction on gated home. Now asking $922,800. Silver Lake condo: $35,000 chop on 3-bedroom, 3-bathroom home. Now asking $1,095,000.”

The Los Angeles Times in California. “Liam Payne managed to make a profit in Monte Nido — barely. The singer-songwriter just sold his leafy Spanish-style compound for $10.161 million, or about $161,000 more than he paid for it in 2015. The pop star spent most of his time on the property trying to sell it, originally offering it up for lease before listing it for $14 million in 2018. With no takers, he eventually lowered the tag to $10.75 million over the summer.”

From Bisnow Los Angeles in California. “Pez Cantina co-owner Lucy Thompson Ramirez remembers lunchtime before the coronavirus pandemic, when the cluster of office high-rises in LA’s Financial District would empty out onto Grand Avenue and hungry workers would flood the sidewalks on their way to her restaurant and the others lining the street. But thanks to the pandemic, the museums have been closed for months, and the office workers are now largely working from home. Downtown Los Angeles was headed into 2020 with a lot to look forward to. About 4,500 residential units came online in 2019, breaking the previous year’s record by 35%.”

“‘Now, I mean, it really is like The Twilight Zone,’ Thompson Ramirez said. ‘Noon hits and it’s four or five people walking around.'”

From Macau Business. “‘[Last year] was definitely the worst year for the housing market since the global financial crisis [in 2008-2009],’ says Jane Liu Zee Ka, managing director of Ricacorp (Macau) Properties Ltd. These days, homebuyers and homeowners are ‘more conservative’ and adopt a ‘wait-and-see’ approach due to the coronavirus outbreak that has been persisting for over a year now, she says. ‘Before the pandemic, all the new flats would be snatched after the sales campaign was launched, but now developers have to come up with different incentives and packages to entice buyers,’ she adds. ‘For instance, some developers now sell a parking space within the same project for MOP 1.4 million, half the price it had before.'”

The Business Standard on China. “Grace Cai, a senior majoring in tourism management at a Guiyang university, had an internship last autumn working as a waitress in a hotel restaurant. She dreads finding a full-time job. ‘There are too many students now,’ she said, ‘and because of the epidemic, it is actually not easy to find a job.'”

“A few blocks to the south of the Laoganma factory, Zhu Haihua drives trucks for a steel factory that makes towers for wind turbines. His monthly paycheck of $2,300 does not include food or housing. That is barely half of what the average American truck driver earns. But the money goes much farther in a Chinese mountain village. Frenetic construction over the past few years and permissive zoning regulations have produced a glut of recently built apartments. That allows Mr. Zhu to lease a three-bedroom apartment for just $175 a month.”

“‘Renting here is very cheap,’ he said.”

From Domain News in Australia. “Landlords of short-stay rentals in the heart of Sydney that once fetched hundreds of dollars a night have been forced to return them to the long-term rental market amid the pandemic, with the supply glut slashing prices for locals. Belle Property Pyrmont agent Alex Tinsley was working in Bondi and across the eastern suburbs when the pandemic first hit last year. He said there was a sudden influx of short-term rentals to the local rental market as international students and tourists returned home in droves, driving down rents and raising vacancy rates.”

“‘Our days on market doubled, prices came down and landlords were missing their mortgage payment,’ Mr Tinsley said. As short-term lets were abandoned by tourists, so too were long-term rentals by locals looking for better deals with landlords desperate to lease them out at almost any cost.”

The Globe and Mail in Canada. “For a brief period in 2018 and 2019, it felt like a new player was ready to shake up Canada’s investment advisory industry – a young force of nature named Gary Ng. Oozing confidence and never breaking his high-wattage smile for the cameras, Mr. Ng laid his acquisition strategy on the table for all to see, openly declaring that he was hungry for more scale. ‘I’ve been told I’m the most powerful man on Bay Street now that nobody’s ever heard of,’ he told Bloomberg LP in 2019.”

“And then, all of a sudden, the man who was everywhere was nowhere. Finally, in November, the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada, the watchdog that oversees Canada’s investment dealers, shed light on his abrupt exit: Mr. Ng had allegedly perpetrated a fraud on the three lenders that helped finance some of his operations by using doctored account statements that showed that he had tens of millions in investments. In reality, IIROC alleged, the money belonged to others – or never existed at all.”

“He was also amassing something else: luxury properties. In July, 2019, the same month Mr. Ng bought his stake in Bridging, he paid $2.2-million for a three-bedroom condominium in downtown Toronto, real estate records show. Two months later, he paid $2.8-million for a penthouse on Toronto’s King Street West. Weeks later, a numbered company under his control plopped down $9-million for a mansion, outfitted with a helipad, lookout tower and a home movie theatre, on Lake Simcoe near Barrie, Ont.”

“In a 2019 appearance on BNN, Mr. Ng was asked where his appetite for dealmaking was going to take him next. He replied: ‘The sky’s the limit.’ But in early 2020, that sky came crashing down on him. On Feb. 2, 2020, days after PI’s management informed the regulator about the ‘unusual documents,’ Mr. Ng transferred ownership of his two Toronto condo units to someone named Andy Ng, for $0. The King Street West penthouse had been listed for sale for $3.8-million, but appears to have been taken off the market. (Realtor photos show it was furnished with two framed pictures of Scrooge McDuck playing with stacks of cash.)”

“Around the same time, Mr. Ng’s name disappeared from the corporate records of the Ontario numbered company that bought his Lake Simcoe mansion, and he was similarly replaced as sole officer and director by Andy Ng. When a Globe reporter visited the property more than a week ago to try to speak with Mr. Ng, there were fresh tire tracks in the snow leading past the driveway gate that bars entry to the grounds. No one answered when a reporter buzzed the intercom.”

“As for the man himself, Mr. Ng has recently surfaced on the internet, both in a Twitter feed and on a personal website. The site, which makes no reference to the scandal, includes tips on investing, as well as links to news stories about him that were published before the fraud allegations. In his most recent blog post, he encourages young entrepreneurs to believe in themselves, write down their ideas and to test those ideas in the marketplace.”

“His ‘last piece of advice,’ he says, is to ‘make mistakes as quickly and as cheaply as possible.'”

This Post Has 69 Comments
  1. ‘people may freak out when they see how much foreclosures rise, but the market desperately needs inventory and the surge won’t be detrimental’

    Better get some boxes.

    1. “The problem that Denver faces is the cost of housing”

      I like the article comment from a few days ago that said Denver is a great place to pay $895,000 for a $125,000 house.

  2. ‘Realtor photos show it was furnished with two framed pictures of Scrooge McDuck playing with stacks of cash’

    Gullible much Canadia?

  3. ‘A retreat from office buildings has led to historic negative absorption and record-high subleasing availability. Office occupancy rates in downtown’s high-rises sat between 8% and 12% post-Labor Day, with just 4% to 5% of offices occupied by mid-December, according to CBRE. ‘The reality of our space right now [is if] it was not able to adapt, it’s sitting dark right now’

    So how many building can take 5% occupancy? None. Yer fooked Alfred.

      1. So to be clear [I think]. The space is leased – but only 5% of the employees that are theoretically supposed to come in during normal time – are. Wow! quite a savings if you can have folks working from home.

  4. “The price is so out of the stratosphere that it’s damaging”, uh, damaging to the possibility of generating a sales commission.

  5. ‘The net operating income of office downtown has been higher than residential, so it requires a subsidy’

    It’s like the poster taxpayer. Get off yer knees taxpayer and eat yer crowz!

    Oh, and try and not get tarred and feathered again this week.

    1. ‘There’s some smoke rising’

      https://twitter.com/CWNewser/status/1351189871197642753

      Hangman, hangman, hold it a little while
      Think I see my friends coming
      Riding a many mile
      Friends did you get some silver?
      Did you get a little gold?
      What did you bring me my dear friends
      To keep me from the gallows pole?
      What did you bring me to keep me from the gallows pole?

      I couldn’t get no silver, I couldn’t get no gold
      You know that we’re too damn poor
      To keep you from the gallows pole

      1. January 6: A Strategic Analysis

        https://www.traditionalright.com/january-6-a-strategic-analysis/

        The Establishment is calling the events of January 6 an “insurrection”. A more accurate term is a “revolt”. The oppressed majority revolted against an elite that simultaneously despises them and lives off their tax money. The “makers” revolted against the “takers”. Whites, males, non-feminist women (one of whom gave her life) and straights revolted against the cultural Marxism that condemns them as evil regardless of what individuals do.

      2. This is a pearl clutching article.

        New York Times — Why Rage Over the 2020 Election Could Last Well Past Trump (1/18/2021):

        “for a certain slice of the 74 million Americans who voted for President Trump, the events of the past two weeks — the five deaths, including of a Capitol Police officer, the arrests that have followed, and the removal of Mr. Trump and right-wing extremists from tech platforms — have not had a chastening effect.

        On the contrary, interviews in recent days show that their anger and paranoia have only deepened, suggesting that even after Mr. Trump leaves the White House, an embrace of conspiracy theories and rage about the 2020 election will live on, not just among extremist groups but among many Americans.

        “It’s a dangerous situation,” said Lucan Way, a political scientist at the University of Toronto who writes about authoritarian regimes. “The ‘election was stolen’ narrative has become part of the political landscape.”

        The country’s political divide is no longer a disagreement over issues like guns and abortion but a fundamental difference in how people see reality. That, in turn, is driving more extremist beliefs. This shift has been years in the making, but it went into hyper-speed after the Nov. 3 election as Mr. Trump and many in his party encouraged Americans, despite all the evidence to the contrary, to believe the results were fraudulent. The belief is still common among Republicans: A Quinnipiac poll published Monday found that 73 percent still falsely believe there was widespread voter fraud.

        https://archive.is/tNBTj

        1. ‘the five deaths’

          Four of which were heart attacks, etc. One unarmed woman shot by a guberment employed BLM nutjob.

          Any media that put us on the Russia, blah blah roller coaster has no credibility. So that’s 99% plus. We vastly outnumber them. They couldn’t open a beer bottle with their soft, pale hands. We got enough guns and ammo. They have pepper spray and would probably hit their own faces if they used it. I am really afraid.

          ‘Hanging was historically used as a method for execution. For this reason, hangings in the past were broadly categorized as judicial or non-judicial. Classically, a judicial hanging involved a ligature with careful knot placement directly below the occiput and a drop equivalent to the victim’s height with abrupt tightening of the ligature and complete suspension of the entirety of the victim’s body weight. When done properly, this resulted in forceful distraction of the head and neck from the body, high cervical fracture, complete cord transection, and death. Victims of judicial hanging are not patients who survive and present to the ED.’

          1. We vastly outnumber them. They couldn’t open a beer bottle with their soft, pale hands.

            If some soy boy hits me, and I find out about it….

          2. If some soy boy hits me

            The three dudes that were trying to harm Rittenhouse in Kenosha were not the pencil necked soyboys that we associate with Antifa. They were violent thugs with criminal records that were paid to cause mayhem.

  6. ‘Our days on market doubled, prices came down and landlords were missing their mortgage payment,’ Mr Tinsley said. As short-term lets were abandoned by tourists, so too were long-term rentals by locals looking for better deals with landlords desperate to lease them out at almost any cost’

    Yes, and the Australian REIC did their bit by running with the FOMO! horsesh$t. Enjoy yer foreclosures Australia. It died in the arse, like Denver.

  7. ‘sold his leafy Spanish-style compound for $10.161 million, or about $161,000 more than he paid for it in 2015’

    Which means he lost money. So much for the red-hotcakes LA.

    1. “…Which means he lost money…”

      Just his property tax bill during 2015-2020 would be north of $500K.

      Add in holding costs such as insurance, maintenance and the like and surely that’s another $500K.

      So, 5 years at a cost of $1mm. But I’m sure he had some great parties.

      1. But I’m sure he had some great parties.

        Isn’t that the whole point in owning one of those trophy shacks in LA? You throw parties to rub elbows with people “who matter”.

        I have to admit, I’ve never heard of the guy, but after googling him I’m clearly not his target demographic.

  8. ‘His monthly paycheck of $2,300 does not include food or housing. That is barely half of what the average American truck driver earns’

    I realize there are almost no senile pedophile supporters, But those of you who do actually exist, this is what you stand for. Globalization, the race to the wage bottom we’ve witnessed for decades. Now China is sinking like a turd in a well. Globalization is finished, and you with it. We’ll plow you over and bury you.

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/01/five-obvious-acts-fraud-2020-election/

  9. That aint no profit.

    Add in taxes, fees, maintenance, insurance, cost of selling, cost of buying, moving expenses…

    Probably a $1 million loss.

    “The Los Angeles Times in California. “Liam Payne managed to make a profit in Monte Nido — barely. The singer-songwriter just sold his leafy Spanish-style compound for $10.161 million, or about $161,000 more than he paid for it…”

  10. Denver did have an influx of west coast migrants. They did bid up the prices for instance in Cherry Creek and Lowry. It is unclear whether this influx will continue this winter and spring.

    ——
    Metro Denver may seem like a bargain to Californians or New Yorkers, but for much of the country is has become an expensive place to live. That has implications for the region’s attractiveness to employers looking to bring jobs to the state and individuals wanting to move here, not to mention creating added financial stress for households as mortgage and rent payments consume a larger share of each paycheck.

    —–
    “The problem that Denver faces is the cost of housing, it is just expensive,” Eisenberg said.

    Metro Denver may seem like a bargain to Californians or New Yorkers, but for much of the country is has become an expensive place to live. That has implications for the region’s attractiveness to employers looking to bring jobs to the state and individuals wanting to move here, not to mention creating added financial stress for households as mortgage and rent payments consume a larger share of each paycheck.

    If there is one thing he could do for Denver and Colorado as a whole, Eisenberg said it would be to find a way to allow builders to construct homes at a lower cost.

  11. I hope no landlords overpaid for their properties and are still cash flow positive.

    “That allows Mr. Zhu to lease a three-bedroom apartment for just $175 a month.”

  12. “Liam Payne managed to make a profit in Monte Nido — barely. The singer-songwriter just sold his leafy Spanish-style compound for $10.161 million, or about $161,000 more than he paid for it in 2015. The pop star spent most of his time on the property trying to sell it, originally offering it up for lease before listing it for $14 million in 2018. With no takers, he eventually lowered the tag to $10.75 million over the summer.”

    It was still cheaper than renting

  13. ‘acquired 285 Quincy St. for $2.5 million. The property is a 21-unit multifamily property’

    That’s right. 21 units, not one airbox, for 2.5M. So all the cry babies out there saying, “oh the vampire squid is gonna buy up everything!” Why didn’t you save yer monies? Did you stretch to “get on the ladder” like the REIC conned you to do?

    Good things come to those who wait. These guys will retire early.

    1. So all the cry babies out there saying, “oh the vampire squid is gonna buy up everything!”

      Who, me? 🙂 That is an encouraging sign. We’ll see if that sort of action spreads to everywhere else. I haven’t bought anything yet. Wife is still impatient but is easier to distract now with the RV.

  14. I know this isn’t much more small steps. Not a drop in a bucket. However, if everyone takes small steps, they will have big effects. I returned my wife Pixel 4a 5G to Bestbuy. My wife even got the restocking fee waived. I returned 2 phone cases back to Amazon. Gonna cancel my free 30 days prime membership end of the month.

    1. I decided to keep my Samsung Android with a cracked screen for a while longer. Gab says they are developing their own smartphone free of all globalist spyware apps.

      An avalanche happens one snowflake at a time…

          1. I’m pretty sure it was never “GPS” but rather triangulation off cell towers. My Kyocera had location, but not sure 3G still works here. Verizon told me they were shutting down 3G, don’t know if they did.

    2. “I returned my wife Pixel 4a 5G to Bestbuy. My wife even got the restocking fee waived. I returned 2 phone cases back to Amazon. Gonna cancel my free 30 days prime membership end of the month.”

      https://youtu.be/Gyu82WG_edM

      PS

      I tried to find that sound effect on BitChute but couldn’t.

    3. Btw, I brought this phone on Dec 26th for my wife. She hated this. She got a free Motorola phone from her brother and decided to use that instead. My son 14 months just cracked my samsung phone but I rather use that phone than any phone from Google. Yes it’s still android but I like samsung interface and store more. Don’t care if it’s cracked lol

    4. Stepping away from the matrix? Once done, there is a power of walking into a store having the ability to buy in cash and then just walking away. The object is not what makes you feel good if it has no usefulness at a certain point.

  15. Now, the mansion next door has been put on the market for an eye-popping $175 million. Critics question whether the $175 million price tag is realistic.

    Once upon a time one could buy an opulent mansion for 1 million. Now that just gets you a shack in some metros.

    Funny how wages haven’t kept pace.

  16. So it turns out that there is a homeless camp one mile from the the Capitol building, and it was the source of fire and smoke reported earlier in the media.

    A homeless camp, walking distance from Capitol Hill. It does seem fitting for the current year.

  17. Sure enjoyed paying 40 cents a gallon more than I did a month ago when I was filling up at the pump today.

    I am sure I’m really gonna love me some New Green Deal.

    1. High fuel prices deliver a knockout blow to the economy. The effects of that oil price spike back in 2008 cannot be overstated. The entire economy runs on oil, despite what libtards say.

    2. The Green Raw Deal

      They won’t take your car away, they’ll just make it too expensive to operate.

    3. Sure enjoyed paying 40 cents a gallon more than I did a month ago

      I filled up both tanks (@ $2/gal) just in case this week gets interesting.

      1. $2.39 a gallon for regular today in my part of Region IV at the same place it was $1.99 a gallon 1 month ago.

        1. I remember working a job back in 2008 and one of the builders was driving an old Ford with a 460. He was really complaining one day because it was costing him $30 per day in fuel to get to the job and back home. I’m sure he was getting less than 10 mpg.

          I also remember getting a few cold calls from different car dealerships I’d purchased from in the past, wondering if I’d be interested in a new truck. They were heavily, heavily discounted. How quickly some forget the past. I have a feeling we’re going to revisit it.

        2. I haven’t paid attention to crude oil or fuel prices lately, and I’m surprised to see crude oil over $50 per barrel. I must have really been asleep because I remember it being in the $30 range.

          Since there’s obviously no fundamental reason to go from negative $40 per barrel to $50 per barrel – an over $90 swing – I suppose it’s just a rotation into commodities by Wall St. speculators. Everything is a momentum trade these days. Fundamentals don’t matter, you just have to jump in with the herd and enjoy the price run-up, then jump out and into the next momentum trade.

    4. “love me some New Green Deal”

      I worked on lighting retrofits at some grocery stores around the Front Range. We swapped out every ballast and fluorescent lamp in each store for new ballasts and LED lamps. I even caught my first and (as of yet) only dose of 277 volts through the heels of both hands that almost knocked me off of the ladder.

      This was a business decision made by the store owners, based on an estimated break even date about 18-24 months after retrofit and an estimated reduction of each store’s electric bill by at least a third.

      A business decision. The store owners paid us because after two years they would save money. We did these jobs because we made money. Nobody needed government involved to make these decisions.

      1. I’m sorry to hear that, my friend. Did you go to the ER to get your heart checked? That could kill you.

      2. Those LED tubes should last a lot longer than the old fluorescent ones too. Plus they give off a nice warmer light.

        Where? King Soopers? Safeway?

      3. “The store owners paid us because after two years they would save money. We did these jobs because we made money. Nobody needed government involved to make these decisions.”

        You got it, when it makes lives better and saves people money you don’t need government to force anyone to buy it, install it or drive it.

  18. Drove by Mar-a-Lago today and I’m here to tell ya, that is one Big @ss American flag our Commander in Chief has flying over that place.

    God Bless Donald Trump, God Bless the dudes working on the road (including the flag guy) in front of his residence and God Bless the United States of America!

  19. “He was living his best life, his girlfriend was moving in next month,” Milan Loncar’s sister said. “There was no reason for this. This wasn’t supposed to happen. He’s 25.”

    26,000 armed troops in DC to “protect” the ruling elite (more like continue the made for tevee movie that is being used to strip our rights) after one cop had a heart attack sitting at a desk during the Capitol “riot” but No cops available in North Philadelphia to protect this guy walking his rescue dog from the criminal thug, after the two social justice judges lowered his bail enough for him to hit the streets and kill someone.

    Suspect Charged With Murder Just Days After Receiving Major Bail Reduction

    By Dan Lyman Monday, January 18, 2021

    Josephus L. Davis, 20, was arrested and charged with murder following the killing of 25-year-old Milan Loncar on Jan. 13th.

    Loncar reportedly called for help before dropping his phone.

    When he was found, he was still holding his dog’s leash.

    Warning: Distressing Footage

    Davis was arrested less than two hours later during a traffic stop connected to a recent carjacking.

    Philadelphia police inspector Derrick Wood revealed Davis had been recently released despite multiple pending felony cases thanks to very lax bail policies implemented by local judges.

    “This male was on the street with two open felony cases because his bail was reduced from 200K to 12K,” Wood tweeted. “This is ridiculous and another example of bail decisions that are being made without considering the safety of the community. Consequences matter.”

    Davis was reportedly facing a slew of charges stemming from a violent carjacking, as well as an attack on a prison guard, when two separate judges sliced his bail to an amount which he managed to produce.

    https://www.newswars.com/suspect-charged-with-murder-just-days-after-receiving-major-bail-reduction/

  20. Is US coronavirus spending and ballooning debt at risk of stoking global asset bubbles?
    – Washington’s massive spending on coronavirus relief is adding to its huge debt levels and priming asset bubbles, analysts say
    – Despite concerns, the US dollar-based global financial system makes it hard for countries like China to reduce their exposure
    Topic |
    Coronavirus pandemic
    Karen Yeung
    Published: 8:30pm, 13 Jan, 2021

    https://www.scmp.com/economy/global-economy/article/3117580/us-coronavirus-spending-and-ballooning-debt-risk-stoking

  21. It’s pretty weird that 80 million Voters of Trump are considered a terrorist group. So, make America Great again is considered some kind of insurrection by the party that stole the election.
    A major Political Party is being treated like a foreign and domestic enemy.
    As usual they are projecting their criminal takeover on to the opposition party.
    This false narrative news , especially the covid19 fraud on the public, and the other fake narratives is being used as a means to take over the Country by Entities that hijacked the Government, and the voting booth.
    These entities aren’t American, but rather one World order Globalist that want to loot, rape and weaken American, and have our Borders invaded.

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