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There Is A Saying That Goes, Never Catch A Falling Knife

A report from the Pahrump Valley Times in Nevada. “Home prices were on the rise in Southern Nevada, including in Pahrump, in March. ‘The pandemic has contributed to the supply shortage due in part to homeowners being out of work, and therefore unable to upgrade even if they wanted to unless they could pay cash,’ added LVR President Aldo Martinez.”

“The number of ‘so-called’ distressed sales remains historically low despite the economic downturn coinciding with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, LVR said in its release. Martinez explained, ‘these low numbers are skewed by the number of homeowners who have filed for mortgage forbearance,’ adding that ‘economists suggest many of these homeowners may have difficulty coming out of forbearance and expect foreclosure numbers to rise above pre-pandemic rates.'”

From Finger Lakes 1 in New York. “More than a year after Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s first executive order during the pandemic related to evictions- the Finger Lakes Landlord Association says local landlords need help. Deb Hall of the Finger Lakes Landlord Association, says that landlords and tenants remain at an impasse. ‘There are some landlords in the region who are reporting over $50,000 in past due rents,’ she added. ‘That is unsustainable to any small business, let alone one that has been forced to provide services without compensation or due process for more than a year.'”

From Bisnow South Florida. “Is this a stretch of sustainable growth or the boom side of another wild boom-and-bust cycle? Peter Zalewski, principal of Brickell Ventures and Condo Vultures, offered some words of caution. Developers of One Thousand Museum, a luxury project in downtown Miami that was designed by Zaha Hadid and has some high-profile owners, have not been able to sell all the units even after five years. They recently refinanced the remaining units with a condo inventory loan to narrowly escape foreclosure.”

“‘You’ve got to wonder: How strong is the market for luxury?’ Zalewski said. ‘Even if David Beckham lives there? How strong is the market if you can’t sell a building in five years?'”

The New York Post on California. “Dwayne Wade and Gabrielle Union have found a buyer for their Sherman Oaks home, almost three months after they slashed the price, The Post has learned. The five-bedroom, nine-bathroom estate was initially listed for $6.2 million right before the coronavirus pandemic hit on March 6, 2020. But with a year having passed by and no luck on getting any offers, the pair were forced to cut the price by half a million, to $5.7 million.”

“As of April 3 the home is now pending a sale. It’s a loss for the duo, who purchased the 8,650-square-foot home for $5.995 million in May 2018, only a few months after construction was completed.”

The Seattle Times in Washington. “The biggest rent drops across Seattle have been in the most expensive apartments, according to CoStar. Among Class A apartments in the Seattle area, which includes most new construction, nearly a third of properties offered concessions like a month of free rent during the early months of the pandemic, more than double the rate a year earlier, according to a July report from HUD. Nearly half of Zillow rental listings in the Seattle area were offering promotions last month.”

“For the condo rentals the company manages, interest is starting to return for two-bedroom spaces but is still low for smaller units, said Cory Brewer, vice president of residential operations at Windermere Property Management / Lori Gill & Associates. ‘If it’s a small unit in downtown, Belltown, Capitol Hill, it’s been very difficult to find someone who wants to lease that.'”

From CBC News. “Canada’s housing market is indeed flush with cash at the moment, with the national average selling price hitting an all-time high of $678,091 in February. That’s up more than 25 per cent from the same month last year, pre-pandemic. Paul Martin, president of the Rideau St Lawrence Real Estate Board that covers Perth, Ont., says ‘the market just took off,’ last year. ‘We’ve seen our property prices jump close to 50 per cent in the area,’ he said.”

“Back in B.C., the frenzy is so great that some people are resorting to buying without ever setting foot in their new homes. That’s what happened to Ean Jackson and his wife Sibylle Tinsel. They recently sold their home in Vancouver and were looking to downsize somewhere farther afield. The couple settled on the tiny community of Powell River, B.C., about 100 kilometres up the coast.”

“Though they are excited for this new chapter, it ‘all feels very awkward,’ Jackson said. ‘It feels really strange. And we look at each other at dinner time just about every night and say, ‘Did we do the right thing? … Did we get ripped off? Or is this going to work out?'”

“Ultimately Jackson says he knows the answer to that last question is yes because they love what the area has to offer, but he does feel for new young families trying to buy in at current levels. ‘You save up for three or four years, you get the price that you think, and then the house just got twice as expensive,’ he said. ‘I can’t see this lasting, though. It’s got to end sometime.'”

The Georgia Straight in Canada. “A realtor fears that the Canadian housing market is so overheated that it could burn the whole thing down. Adam Major, managing broker with Holywell Properties, says that what led to the U.S. housing crash in 2008 might be happening now in the country. Major believes that the government ‘probably should have done something already.'”

“The realtor recalled that one of the causes of the U.S. housing crash were ‘teaser’ or adjustable-rate mortgages. ‘In the U.S. in 2005 to 2006, somewhere between 30 percent to 40 percent of all mortgages sold were ‘teasers’, where the rates started out low, but went up after two years,’ he explained. Buyers then found out that after their rates went up, they could not afford the payments. With the value of their houses going down, they could not refinance their mortgages.”

“Here in Canada, many home buyers are currently getting mortgage rates at 1.5 percent and below. ‘We are now in a position where nearly 100 percent of the mortgages being sold in Canada could be ‘teaser’ rate mortgages,’ Major noted.”

“‘You hear all these buyers are coming from Hong Kong and that might be true. But is it enough to…keep inflating the housing prices here? I’m skeptical that it is.’ Major noted that there is a saying that goes, ‘never catch a falling knife.’ ‘If you can buy for less in six months’ time, you’ll wait six months,’ Major said. ‘So that’s the same way for Canadians and people coming from wherever else in the world: they’re going to wait to buy if prices start to go down.'”

From Good Returns in New Zealand. “Cashed up investors along with owner occupiers will now be the ones determining house prices, says Westpac economist Satish Ranchhod. ‘In the existing low interest rate environment, investors’ search for yield and capital gains on rental properties has underpinned rapid increases in house prices, but the Government’s plans to scrap mortgage interest deductibility against rental income is going to significantly reduce the prices investors are willing to pay for houses,’ says Ranchhod.”

“A rough calculation by Westpac’s economists indicates owner occupiers’ average willingness to pay is about 10% below existing prices. This suggests house prices could eventually fall by that much in the long term. While that will be a big drop, it will only bring prices back to where they were four months ago.”

“Alexander says investors have an established history of spitting the dummy whenever the Government makes changes which negatively affect them. Yet there is zero evidence of follow-through from earlier threats to quit the sector. ‘The thought of selling then having the cash sit in the bank will be a strong brake on the willingness of many to quit their housing asset this year and next.’ He says this time things could be a bit different given the lumping of the tax change on top of increased expenses related to Healthy Homes, ring-fencing of losses, and decreased ability by investors to manage their property.”

From Daily Mail Australia. “Fear of paying too much for a house is replacing that fear of missing out as property prices surge to ridiculous levels, new research shows. In just six months, Sydney’s median house prices has climbed by $129,400 as Australian home values soared at the fastest pace in 32 years. But in one beachside suburb of the nearby Central Coast, house prices surged by $575,000 or 68 per cent in one year.”

“With property price records being set in more than two-thirds of Australia’s housing sub markets, potential buyers are increasingly worried about being ripped off. Almost half, or 48 per cent of first-home buyers, cited paying too much as their biggest fear, a Finder survey of 1,028 property newcomers found. By comparison, only a third of respondents had a fear of being unable to service a mortgage.”

“A banking regulator crackdown in 2017 caused a two-year housing market downturn following more than five years of strong growth. With that in mind, 21 per cent of first-home buyers Finder surveyed were worried property prices would go down after they had bought their home. Canstar’s group executive of financial services Steve Mickenbecker said the Reserve Bank or the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority, the banking regulator, would have to act sooner to stop a potential house price bubble.”

“‘Pressure is going to start to build on the Reserve Bank and financial regulators to step in if we don’t see the property market start to slow in the next few months,’ he said.”

This Post Has 109 Comments
  1. ‘spit (out) the dummy. To have a childish overreaction or angry outburst to a negative situation or outcome; to act in a bad-tempered manner, likened to a temper tantrum of a child.’

    1. i.e, foot stamping, broke and enraged home debtors who gambled and lost like a degenerate.

      It’s what happens when you pretend you’re armed with facts when in reality you’re completely uninformed.

  2. ‘In the U.S. in 2005 to 2006, somewhere between 30 percent to 40 percent of all mortgages sold were ‘teasers’, where the rates started out low, but went up after two years,’ he explained. Buyers then found out that after their rates went up, they could not afford the payments. With the value of their houses going down, they could not refinance their mortgages’

    ‘Here in Canada, many home buyers are currently getting mortgage rates at 1.5 percent and below. ‘We are now in a position where nearly 100 percent of the mortgages being sold in Canada could be ‘teaser’ rate mortgages’

    So we read about prices doubling in a couple of years. If true, and a lot of it is REIC horsesh$t, it can only happen if there’s major mortgage and appraisal fraud. That’s what is going on right now.

      1. Like buying a house on layaway. Except you never pay for it. And live in it. B/c you can never refi out of your bullshit teaser. Oh and Daddy Sugar will cover the banks losses when you walk.

    1. Buyers then found out

      These must be the same people who “find themselves” with two kids at age 21. 🙄

        1. I’m criticizing those house-buying FB’s who couldn’t seem to figure out that their house payment would increase after a grace period. The same way that these women can’t figure out where the kids came from. But the media gives them a break.

    2. Just for fun, I should ask a broker if I can get a stated income, balloon payment variable APR mortgage, and refi with cash out in 90 days. I’ll need gas money for my zero-down, zero-payment Mitsubishi.

      1. “…and refi with cash out in 90 days.”

        “…and refi with a 125% cash out in 90 days.”

        *since we’re reminiscing. 🙂

    3. it can only happen if there’s major mortgage and appraisal fraud. That’s what is going on right now.

      There’s massive fraud in every loan sector right now. I’d bet it’s the worst we’ve ever seen. That’s the only way prices can detach from incomes.

    4. How mortgage works in Canada – and has been for 5 decades. The mortgage itself is amortized for 15, 25 or 30 years. But unlike the US there is not a fixed rate for 30 years. It is for 5 years (or sometimes 7) – it will be for current prime +/- x% (where x is usually 0.5 – 1). At the end of the 5 years, the mortgage rate will reset to prime + the same X. There is not cash out or anything else, **unless** there is a full refi initiated by the customer.

      Consequences:
      If prime goes from 2.5 to 4.5, they will have to pay an extra 200 basis points for the next 5 year period. With a 20% down payment, this was not a problem as there was little risk in default. However in the past 15 years, with folks (under different govt insurance programs and possibility of 3-5% down) there could now be a massive problem if prices drop 15-20% or more.

    5. “Buyers then found out that after their rates went up, they could not afford the payments.”

      How could they have not known this when they signed the paperwork?

      1. When we sold our condo in 2004, our used home seller tried to refer us to a mortgage broker offering zero interest mortgages over an initial period of years, after which they reamortized at a market determined rate.

        There was no way, no how, that I was going to touch one of those dangerous alligators with a ten foot pole.

    1. sounds like a Keynesian paradox , since the dollar has been debased and has lost 98 % of its purchasing power since 1913 .

  3. ‘They recently refinanced the remaining units with a condo inventory loan to narrowly escape foreclosure’

    ‘You’ve got to wonder: How strong is the market for luxury?’ Zalewski said. ‘Even if David Beckham lives there? How strong is the market if you can’t sell a building in five years?’

    Ahem…

    1. Sounds like an Indiana Jones thing…

      Like foreclosure is a big rolling rock or something.

      You can’t afford it! You never could afford it. It was a gamble on sweet equity.

  4. ‘the home is now pending a sale. It’s a loss for the duo, who purchased the 8,650-square-foot home for $5.995 million in May 2018’

    Wa? A loss, in California? But red hotcakes?

    Eat yer crowz Thornberg.

  5. ‘owner occupiers’ average willingness to pay is about 10% below existing prices. This suggests house prices could eventually fall by that much in the long term. While that will be a big drop, it will only bring prices back to where they were four months ago’

    You guys are so fooked.

    ‘A banking regulator crackdown in 2017 caused a two-year housing market downturn following more than five years of strong growth’

    Oh for those days the media forgets. Recall the most expensive shacks fell first and furthest. Yep, not airboxes, but leafy, multi-million peso shacks went down 30, 40% lickety split. Then a new guberment got elected, proudly announced they with the central banks were gonna reflate the bubble, and here we are.

    Why did they crack down? Banks were handing out loans like candy. Like we are seeing now.

    1. “You guys are so fooked.”

      U.S. housing prices have been levitating for so long now that even big investment firms are piling in to capture a piece of the action.

      Couldn’t housing gamblers get quite a bit richer before the gravy runs out?

    2. The Hotel California Fed squawking about an exit strategy again.

      “I do worry about excesses and imbalances,” adding that “failing to communicate Fed exit could stoke risk-taking.”

      You don’t say? Kind of late in the process to realize don’t ya think? Any bets on how long the next Fed exit strategy lasts before they have to reverse course and slash interest rates to zero?

        1. That didn’t work out so well for Blackrock. They lost their ass…. like everyone else does.

    1. So now we have every US agency with the power to abrogate contract law? Where are the courts? Oh, that’s right, John Roberts pissed himself.

      1. I suspect that the reason we don’t see more activity in the courts is that the big players know, and have been promised behind closed doors, they will be made whole via bail outs. The smaller folks can’t afford the lawyers. It’s a perfect set up. The big players will be flush with government cash to buy up the foreclosure market while their clients lose their properties and end up on 400$/week universal basic income.

  6. ‘The pandemic has contributed to the supply shortage due in part to homeowners being out of work’

    You read that right. The shortage is cuz of losing jobs.

    ‘The number of ‘so-called’ distressed sales remains historically low despite the economic downturn coinciding with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, LVR said in its release. Martinez explained, ‘these low numbers are skewed by the number of homeowners who have filed for mortgage forbearance,’ adding that ‘economists suggest many of these homeowners may have difficulty coming out of forbearance and expect foreclosure numbers to rise above pre-pandemic rates’

    This is why you make the big bucks Aldo.

    1. “You read that right. The shortage is cuz of losing jobs.”

      Of course! Unemployed Millennials had nothing better to do than gamble their stimulus checks on Bitcoin, GameStonks and real estate investment…

      1. Yeah that $1,200 really put a dent in the down payment… Just kidding, down payments are for losers.

        1. Just kidding, down payments are for losers.

          Right on. I’m waiting for no down payment with cash back at closing like the good old days in 2006. Can’t be far off now.

    2. You read that right. The shortage is cuz of losing jobs.

      Everything comes up roses now. Every scenario has a carefully crafted narrative with the conclusion of price increases, no matter what. Just look at the stock market. There is no news, good or bad, that isn’t bullish for stocks. UE higher than expected? More QE and higher stock prices. UE lower than expected? Economy is going to rocket, higher stock prices.

          1. Supply chains are still constrained.

            And a sectional sofa from Macy’s takes 26 weeks.

          2. And a sectional sofa from Macy’s takes 26 weeks.

            I’ve heard that many models of appliances are back ordered for months.

          3. that fridges

            Ironically, there is no “d” in refrigerator. It’s on back order I guess.

          4. “I’ve heard that many models of appliances are back ordered for months.”

            Correct. We recently purchased a new washer, dryer and a dishwasher. We had to buy what was in-stock, not what we originally wanted.

      1. “…price increases, no matter what.”

        Yep. It’s the ‘everything always goes up, no matter what’ economy, for sure!

    3. There is something happening with my email address as it doesn’t like the “&” and keeps changing it. I will insert a new one.

      1. “…as it doesn’t like the “&” and keeps changing it.”

        That usually a reserved character for a URL redirection script parameter parser.

  7. It’s different this time.

    “Sentiment is in very worrisome territory as is valuation, yet money flows continue to push indices higher,” strategist led by Tobias Levkovich wrote in a note. “Huge fiscal stimulus and supportive central banks have created the notion of there being no need to be risk averse.”

  8. The Financial Times
    Opinion Property sector
    Central banks should not target house prices
    The idea has won support, especially in New Zealand, but there are better ways to make housing more affordable
    Robin Harding yesterday

    The worldwide fall in interest rates over the past two decades has caused a runaway boom in house prices. Therefore, it makes sense to raise interest rates so houses become affordable again. The first of these statements is almost certainly true — but the second does not follow. It would in fact be a disastrous mistake.

    New Zealand’s government recently told its central bank to consider the impact on housing when it sets monetary policy. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand rebelled and said it will do no such thing, but as people across the world struggle to afford a house, there was a wave of sympathy for the idea. To see why the RBNZ was correct, however, consider what would happen if a central bank tried to target house prices.

    A fall in interest rates makes a given flow of rent (if a property is let out) or accommodation (if it is owner occupied) more valuable. Owners discount that cash flow using the risk-free rate, so there is little doubt that the proximate cause of rising house prices in many countries over the past couple of decades is cheaper money. If lower interest rates made house prices go up, then quite logically, higher interest rates will make them go down again.

    But central banks did not cut interest rates to zero and launch massive programmes of asset purchases out of some perverted desire to raise house prices. They did so because they judged it essential to meeting their mandates of stable prices and full employment. If they tried to stabilise house prices instead, by how much would they have to raise interest rates?

    The answer is: a lot. The economists Òscar Jordà, Moritz Schularick, and Alan Taylor studied the sensitivity of house prices to interest rates across 14 countries and 140 years of history. They found that a 1 per cent rise in interest rates reduces the ratio of house prices to incomes by about 4 per cent. In New Zealand, for example, that ratio has risen by about half in a decade, implying a double-digit rise in interest rates to stabilise it.

    1. “If they tried to stabilise house prices instead, by how much would they have to raise interest rates?

      The answer is: a lot.”

      This is a great finding, as it implies that the Fed could let interest rates rise considerably from current low levels with little effect on housing prices. A little back-of-the-envelope math makes me wonder about the validity of the result, but I guess since it’s a peer reviewed economics journal article, it must be correct.

    2. But central banks did not cut interest rates to zero and launch massive programmes of asset purchases out of some perverted desire to raise house prices.

      Funny, how sovereign debt never gets mentioned. It’s a lot easier for spendthrift nations to service bonds that pay 1% vs. 6%.

      1. Funny how Ben Bernanke’s housing bubble reflation program never gets mentioned…

      2. It’s just a happy coincidence that government debt goes up as interest rates are pushed down:
        —————–
        Fed’s Waller says the central bank isn’t keeping rates low to finance government debt
        Published Mon, Mar 29 202111:55 AM
        by Jeff Cox
        CNBC

        https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/29/waller-says-fed-isnt-keeping-rates-low-to-run-up-the-deficit.html
        —————–

        It was just a matter of time after the conventional wisdom accepted that the money supply was the source of, and the solution to, the economic ills which plague a country, that manipulations of the money supply would commence in earnest.

        OTOH, there’s that quote: “When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.”

        However, regardless of its true efficacy, manipulating the money supply has one very happy side effect – it is exceedingly effect at transferring purchasing power upward in the economic pyramid.

        Don’t forget where you really stand though. The GME experience was informative. The retail traders thought they were swimming in the ocean, until push came to shove and some of the big boys were threatened, and then they discovered they were swimming in a barrel. The Fed is firehosing money at the markets but unless you can close positions as fast as JP Morgan and Goldman Sachs did with Archegos (Nomura, one of the big players, was a bagholder), realize what your risk really is, when push comes to shove.

      1. The shortage is in the containers. Same thing happened a year ago when milk trucks were dumping milk bound for restaurants onto the ground. The milk was fine, but the restaurants were closed and there were no containers to sell the milk in a grocery store.

        1. Plus a lot of restaurants are handing them out instead of letting you use the pump dispensers or bottles on the table for “less contact”

  9. “More than a year after Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s first executive order during the pandemic related to evictions- the Finger Lakes Landlord Association says local landlords need help. Deb Hall of the Finger Lakes Landlord Association, says that landlords and tenants remain at an impasse. ‘There are some landlords in the region who are reporting over $50,000 in past due rents,’ she added. ‘That is unsustainable to any small business, let alone one that has been forced to provide services without compensation or due process for more than a year.’”

    Yer mistake was to become a landlord in Socialist sh*thole like NY. Don’t all try to sell at once when the moratorium ends!

    “But with a year having passed by and no luck on getting any offers, the pair were forced to cut the price by half a million, to $5.7 million.”

    “As of April 3 the home is now pending a sale. It’s a loss for the duo, who purchased the 8,650-square-foot home for $5.995 million in May 2018, only a few months after construction was completed.”

    It was still cheaper than renting!

  10. https://nypost.com/2021/03/16/gofundme-to-pay-off-meghan-markle-and-harrys-mortgage-goes-bust/

    Well, I was about to donate $5. You know, because your wife is underprivileges and of your stupid whine fest on TV. Just kidding!

    Wonder why there was a lack of sympathy? Maybe because you brought a 18,000-square-foot mansion with swimming pool and tennis court for $19 millions, and now are asking people for donations to pay off the mortgage when millions of people lost their jobs during the Pandemic. Go F*CK yourselves

  11. Botox Botox Botox……The situation is similar at Plump, which offers cosmetic injectables and other high-tech skin-care services in New York and Miami. “We’re slammed, like fully booked,”

    but evidence of pent-up demand for its services, which include eyebrow maintenance and hair removal, is clear.

    she hasn’t seen her larger social circle in a long time, and impressing people by being hot is fun. Feeling hot is fun

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/04/pandemic-beauty-salon-spa-botox-appointments/618520/

    1. “Woods accidentally hit the accelerator instead of the brake.”

      Does that happen alot?

      Luckily for me and my loved ones, and despite my not being a professional athlete, over the course of 45 years of driving experience and maybe half a million driving miles on the road, I have never done that.

        1. Well, there is always the Neutral position on gearboxes.

          But yeah, some people panic and freeze.

      1. I’ve done it twice. But I got the impression that Woods was already speeding even before he panicked.

      2. “Woods accidentally hit the accelerator instead of the brake.”

        Maybe it was some phone action, “in flagrante delicto?”

  12. When I was a red blooded American yute getting jabbed meant getting stuck with a knife and it wasn’t something wanted to happen.

    Now listening to these uppity fuqe Woke betters who think they’re all that saying… Did you get your jab? I got my jab. I’m getting my jab tomorrow.

    makes me want to puke.

    If you are good little boys and girls and you wear 3 masks, keep your social distance and get 2 jabs we might let you cook a hotdog in the backyard for grandma and 1 neighbor on the Fourth of July.

    Just don’t count on any ketchup for that hotdog. 🙂

    Covid vaccines: How to get your jab if you have missed out
    Published3 hours ago

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-56660034

    1. This whole CCP Flu scam has been very revealing about white liberal racism and white liberal privilege.

      Any time I see the phrase “working from home” what it really means is white liberal racists working from home while poor people deliver them things.

      Imagine if this CCP Flu happened in the year 1990. None of these white liberal racists would be working from home, and herd immunity would have been achieved 8 months ago.

      1. Maybe some of the new illegals can become delivery drivers. Extra points when they get their driver license they will automatically be registered to vote.

    2. That they are calling them “jabs” instead of “shots” seems suspect, to say the least.

      Of course, in the UK, even though you’ve had “the jab” you still can’t have anyone visit your home, even if they’ve had “the jab”. So go hide under your bed and wait until the guberment tells you it’s safe to come out.

      1. The UK is a cuck country with a majority cuck population.

        People in the Netherlands and France have the stones to go out and riot against tyranny. Meanwhile the UK live in their docile cuck shed. We should deport Fauci there, they deserve him.

        1. “The UK is a cuck country with a majority cuck population.”

          ^ This!

          I’m still in disbelief over the Piers Morgan being cancelled by Meghan Markle and Oprah Winfrey. Poor multi-millionaire Meghan considering suicide? Haha…just tabloid BS for the plebs to suckle!

          1. And Harry lands a cuck Silicon Valley job, “chief impact officer.” Starting at the top, ‘eh chief? LMAO!!

  13. Look, one of the jobs of the Government is to regulate Commerce, enforce law and order, protect our borders, and not aid a treasonous insurrection by Globalist Monopolies and foreign enemies.

    The balance of power between Corporations and the public and Government was reasonable enough in the first half of my life that what’s going on now is just so bizarre by comparison. Monopolies that collude with Foreign enemies with a One World Order idea where these Entities determine the life of populations of people with Government being their bought off pawn is what has happened. Now we have to worry about criminally rigged Elections so these fraudulent Entities create more power to mess with the people.
    Seriously, Monopoly Corporations , which sell a product usually , are not the Entities that should be dictating policy for the People. Talk about conflict of interest. Everything is so rigged now that’s its just CLOWN WORLD. And what is equitable about these Entities being in control to the point our Constitutional protections are being hijacked.
    And look at that corrupt Biden Puppet just being a Puppet to the agenda of these Entities that are treasonous, fraudulent and anti US Citizen.

    I would venture to say that the actual Majority in the USA wanted a capitalist Country, under the rule of law and Constitution protections, with limited Government , with protected borders, and would reject a One World Order agenda with Top Down Control by Monopolies and Medical Tyranny of all things by that Monopoly.

    I don’t know what is going to happen but you can already see how insane everything is.

  14. Just read that 59% of voters in Fort Collins voted to ban plastic bags.

    It’s good to see that they are focused on solving real problems, instead of focusing on jobs, crime and homelessness. Everyone I know who lives there gripes about low pay and the high cost of living. But hey, we banned plastic bags, we’re saving the Earth!

    1. we banned plastic bags, we’re saving the Earth!
      Wasn’t it about a year ago when grocery stores either outlawed reusable bags or at a minimum made you pack your own groceries?
      If we are back to fixing the big problems like plastic bags the Pandemic must be almost over.

    2. California’s ban went out the window with COVID when reusable bags became unsanitary.

      1. Plus people who use food stamps cant be charged the 10 cents per bag fee, so you see them load up 2 items per bag….they must have a couple of of dawgs/cats at home (poop bags),

      1. Infighting. And it’s happening a lot faster than I thought.

        From the article: “Brooke Baldwin announces exit from CNN, says she doesn’t have a job lined up: ‘Feeling very, very vulnerable.”

        From Celebrity Net Worth: she’s worth $10 million. Geeze woman, just buy a house in blue area and live off your millions. She’d fit right in in Maryland. Lots of women here.

          1. Losing the seven figure paycheck has to hurt. Sure, she won’t be hitting any food banks.

  15. Steven Crowder Reenacts George Floyd Killing to Test “Knee on Neck” Theory

    Wednesday, April 07, 2021

    Comedian Steven Crowder reenacted the death of George Floyd Wednesday, attempting to test the prosecution’s theory that a person’s knee on his back caused the death.

    Crowder tested the theory live for a second time on his show Wednesday, this time having his producer kneel on his neck for 9 minutes on concrete instead of carpet.

    “I don’t expect this to be pleasant, but I think people need to see what it’s like with the closest to controlled conditions that we can recreate, as far as body mass, weight, situation, to see what it actually might be like if someone is not in an agitated, significantly overdosed state.”

    The prosecution’s case in the ongoing murder trial against former Officer Derrick Chauvin depends heavily on proving he knelt on Floyd’s neck hard enough to cause asphyxiation.

    “I don’t want to do this, but again the point is: the drugs, the agitation, the actively-resisting arrest, the three-and-a-half times of lethal fentanyl, matters,” Crowder explained.

    A man dressed as an officer next weighed in around 195, trying to closely match the approximate weight of Chauvin wearing equipment, before handcuffing Crowder and kneeling on his neck.

    By the end of the video, the officer has his full body weight on Crowder, with both of his knees on his back and neck — and the show host survives it proving his point.

    Returning to the studio, Crowder concluded a person kneeling on the neck of someone of moderate health would not be enough to kill someone.

    https://www.newswars.com/steven-crowder-reenacts-george-floyd-killing-to-test-knee-on-neck-theory/

    1. The officer’s knee was applied against the cervical spine, not the carotid arteries or trachea. End of story…unless you subscribe to thug life.

  16. “…there is a saying that goes, ‘never catch a falling knife.’
    ‘If you can buy for less in six months’ time, you’ll wait six months,’ Major said. ‘So that’s the same way for Canadians and people coming from wherever else in the world: they’re going to wait to buy if prices start to go down.’”

    If anyone in SoCal is advocating a precautious approach to real estate gambling at this point, it is completely drowned out by the loud used home seller chants of ‘buy now while interest rates are low’, ‘real estate always goes up’, ‘renting is just throwing money away’, and ‘buy now or get priced out forever’.

    The thought that another speculative wave of housing bubble appreciation might soon crash on San Diego shores does not enter a Southern Californian’s thought process or conversation. Anyone who brought this up would be casually disregarded as insane. (Been there, done that…)

  17. The George Floyd case is a hard case because even if the restraining of George on the ground wasn’t the cause of death, it sure looked excessive for a guy who was having a medical event which at some point he stopped resisting. If a overdose was the cause of death , I don’t know that you can claim murder I for what looks like a excessive restraint case.

    If the Rioters don’t get Murder One, they threaten to burn Cities. Mod Justice doesn’t care about the facts or that Floyd had enough dope in him to kill a horse. Would Floyd of died regardless of what measures the Cops took because of the amount of drugs in his body. Did the restraint on the ground cause the death is my biggest question. Would he of survived the overdose had he not been restrained on the ground with some pressure applied? Are Cops suppose to be responsible for what a medical condition is of a person if they don’t know the person took a overdose of drugs?
    When did the Cops call for Medical assistance ? If they called for medical than that implies that there was no intent to murder.

    1. “Are Cops suppose to be responsible for what a medical condition is of a person if they don’t know the person took a overdose of drugs?”

      Who resisted arrest for 20minutes.

      Cop was an @ss. IMHO should be charged with being an @ss and excessive force not murder.

      1. excessive force

        MSM is headlining the prosecution’s highlights and not the destruction of its witnesses on cross examination.

        1. Right, it seems like maybe a excessive restraint case rather than a murder one case. But I would like to know what cops are taught to restrain a person that isn’t complying with a arrest. You see on tv all the time the Cops want the suspect to get down on the ground. The Cops actions looked excessive, but maybe he was waiting for the medical people to arrive and wasn’t applying that much pressure. It just looked really bad . I would hate for anyone to get charged for murder when it really isn’t true. I would think that Cops encounter suspects on drugs all the time and they must have procedures for dealing with those situations.

          The bottom line is the facts don’t matter to mod Justice. This Cop might get convicted by the Jury just because they are afraid to not convict because of the Mod. Its all very unfortunate.

          1. This Cop might get convicted by the Jury just because they are afraid to not convict because of the Mod.

            The jury might convict on manslaughter but it won’t be enough for the mob.

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