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It’s The Same Shit Now

A report from the News Daily in Georgia. “Several weeks back, I asked in this space, ‘What is the plan?’ An extended eviction and foreclosure moratorium, put in place by the CDC during this lengthy pandemic will expire on July 31. The scope of pending rental evictions and foreclosures for non-payment of lease/rent and mortgage payments is unprecedented. Estimates range from 184,000 — 353,452 Georgians are several months or more than a year behind on back rent. The number of potential foreclosures looming is thankfully not quite as high, but remains in the double-digit thousands. The federal number of those pending displacement and loss of their current housing is estimated between 5.7 and 7-million. That would be akin to making all of New York City homeless.”

From Market Watch. “Many homeowners with mortgages backed by the Federal Housing Administration, or FHA, are delinquent on their homes, according to the American Enterprise Institute. Around 14.7% of the 7.6 million FHA mortgages outstanding nationwide were delinquent as of May, up slightly from the previous month. Additionally, 10.5% of these loans were seriously delinquent, meaning they were 90 days or more past due and in danger of going into default.”

“The FHA program targets homeowners with lower credit scores and less money saved for a down payment — the program tends to be popular among first-time buyers and people of color. Atlanta tops the list, with 17.4% of the city’s mortgages in delinquency as of May. The city also has a large share of FHA loans overall, with those loans representing over a fifth of all mortgages in the city. Many of the metro areas most threatened by such a scenario were located in Texas, including Houston (No. 2), Dallas (No. 4), San Antonio (No. 8) and Ft. Worth (No. 9).”

From Hometown Station in California. “Richard Szerman’s immense knowledge of the housing market has made him one of the Santa Clarita Valley’s best realtors. On May 20, Szerman used his knowledge of recent legislation on home foreclosures during a discussion on the Hometown Morning Show on KHTS, to help listeners stay on top of things. ‘The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has put forward a suggestion, it’s a pretty good one I think, to pause all foreclosures until January of 2022,’ Szerman said. ‘Of course, typical of a government agency, they have a very good idea, it’s very pro-public, it should work very nicely, and then all of a sudden we get to the comment period and they start to add things.'”

“‘But then what happened is, right at the last minute just before they finished this up, there were two very important amendments added,’ Szrman said. ‘The first amendment is, if we at the bank decide that we can’t do better than what you’ve already got, then we don’t have to do anything and we can foreclose on you right now. And the other thing is, you have to show some kind of hardship that is somehow directly related to the pandemic. Which is another way of saying, we can deny it under anything.'”

From KXXV in Texas. “There’s more than one neighborhood in Central Texas where neighbors say a new for sale sign goes up every day. And like the mortgage crisis of 2007 and 2008, when many realized they’d overbought for their income, Central Texas Homeowner Martin Sierra suspects that’s happened again right in his own backyard. ‘You see that just in this neighborhood alone,’ said Sierra.”

From WCMH in Ohio. “Realtors say, for some, an unsuspecting group is paying well over asking price for homes all across central Ohio. With home appreciation values the highest they’ve ever been, corporate buyers are investing more heavily in central Ohio real estate. And with some organizations targeting a relatively low return on their investment, these organizations bear the risk of a repeat crash like we saw in 2008.”

“‘The more homes that they own as a percentage basis of our overall market, the bigger the risk is to the total market that the amount of inventory goes up by 25% overnight,’ said Troy Marsh, a local real estate agent, should one or more of these organizations choose to offload their Columbus assets.”

From Fox 43. “In a competitive real estate market, sometimes people rush into a deal that doesn’t fit their budget or suit their needs – and for millennials this year – they’re suffering from what experts say is a major case of buyer’s remorse. Nicole Bachaud, an economic data analyst for Zillow says that buyer’s remorse in a market that has home prices rising, bidding wars & low supply overall – isn’t surprising. ‘We do hear a lot of those anecdotal stories about buyer’s remorse happening.'”

“Bankrate says 64% of millennials have regrets after buying a home. Many say the biggest problems they face include feeling financially unprepared for the costs of home ownership, overpaying on the sales prices and disliking their size of the home. With the urgency in the market – a lot of people are moving really quickly – and you maybe didn’t consider all the factors of the house that they’re looking to purchase, Bachaud said, ‘but we’re not going to see prices coming down at all – we’re going to continue to see these prices increase over the year and next coming years.'”

The Florida Bulldog. “The report by the nonprofit Floridians for Honest Lending (FHL) targets robo-signing, the discredited and illegal practice of treating foreclosure papers like assembly line goods. The report based on 2019-2020 South Florida court records shows that illegal robo-signing persists. For example, stacks of mortgage loans originated by the notorious Countrywide bear the signatures of three bank executives–if the papers were legit, a trio that could boast of superhuman powers. ‘It’s the same shit now,’ said a foreclosure defense lawyer who practices in Broward and commented anonymously, fearing retaliation. ‘It’s the same names over and over. Clearly, from court records, what’s on the documents are stamps. That’s the evidence right there.'”

The Denver Post in Colorado. “According to the Denver Metro Association of Realtors, the 2,137 single-family homes available for sale at the end of June is nearly 60% higher than May’s depressed count, and the active inventory of condos and townhomes rose 33.3% month-over-month to 985. Combined, the Denver area experienced a 50.5% gain in its active inventory, a new record for a monthly increase and six-fold higher than the 5.9% gain averaged between May and June.”

“‘Big percentage changes can happen when you start with the low inventory we have been seeing. The impact of the increase will be felt by both buyers and sellers alike,’ said Andrew Abrams, chairman of DMAR’s Market Trends Committee. ‘While I did have one deal that went $75,000 over asking price last month, I also had two other buyers get properties at or below the asking price,’ Abrams said. Sellers, who were almost guaranteed a final price above the list price, can’t assume that will be the case anymore.”

“A big driver behind the higher inventory was an increase in new listings hitting the market. Those rose 23.9% month-over-month, which reflects a higher comfort level among sellers when it comes to listing their homes. The gain in new listings surpassed the 9.23% gain in the number of closed properties, allowing the inventory to rise.”

“There is an emerging sense that after months of extreme imbalance between supply and demand, which contributed to a string of broken records, moderation may be returning to the market. ‘In a year of coloring outside of the box, we may have just started to draw within the lines,’ Abrams said.”

From Dirt on Arizona. “For those with the dough to get into the game, high-end real estate can be a great return on a multimillion-dollar investment, particularly over the last handful of years or so when high-dollar homes have been bought and sold across the country with an almost alarming alacrity and eye-popping profits. Not so lucky are married music industry royals and art world go-getters Alicia Keys and Kasseeem Dean. They majorly missed that money-minting boat with the recent sale of their luxury desert getaway in Phoenix, Ariz., that’s been sold for $3.1 million, a pocketbook punishing $700,000 less than the $3.9 million tax records show was paid for the property just over 13 years ago.”

The New York Post. “The fairy tale mansion featured in Taylor Swift’s ‘Blank Space’ music video is up for auction with a massive price cut. Initially asking $20 million, the 12-bedroom, 10-bathroom Long Island property is now asking for a starting bid of only $7 million.”

From CBC News in Canada. “The total number of homes sold in the Metro Vancouver area last month was 3,762, down 11.9 per cent from May, according to the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV). ‘Metro Vancouver’s housing market continues to experience strong sellers’ market conditions, although the intensity of demand has eased from what we saw throughout most of the spring,’ REBGV economist Keith Stewart said. ‘We’re now seeing a market that’s beginning to normalize from the torrid pace in the spring. This is making multiple offers less common, allowing subjects to be seen on offers more frequently again, and is making new price records less likely.'”

The Globe and Mail in Canada. “Toronto’s housing market eased further in June, with the average selling price declining 2 per cent over May and sales dropping for the third straight month. Realtors said at the beginning of the year that virtually every property was selling but now buyers are pickier. ‘Buyers are more selective. They have more choice,’ said Paul Singh, a realtor with Justo Brokerage.”

“Mr. Singh said homes that would have fetched $1-million in the first quarter of the year are now selling for between $970,000 and $980,000. In the country’s most expensive real estate market, sales were also down in June. In the Vancouver region and B.C.’s Fraser Valley, the volume of sales fell 12 per cent and 24 per cent, respectively, according to their local boards. June was the first month under the federal government’s stricter mortgage stress test. It is unclear whether this contributed to the slowdown in activity.”

This Post Has 91 Comments
  1. ‘The FHA program targets homeowners with lower credit scores and less money saved for a down payment — the program tends to be popular among first-time buyers and people of color’

    They broke it off in yer a$$ – again!

        1. “People are stupid.”

          An example:

          People stood in line and paid big money to listen to George Carlin tell them how they were getting screwed by The Big Club. They had absolutely no doubt this was true and this is why they laughed.

          1. I saw Carlin in Vegas about a year before he died.
            He was pulling out all stops at that time , to the point people were walking out.
            Looking back at what he was saying, that I think has been censored, he was spot on about what was to come.
            Under cancel culture its difficult for Comedians to do what they do best and that is poking fun at the narratives and insanity.
            The narratives and cancel culture is just such a assault on creative thinking. The censorship thing , for insane and irrational narratives is just mass brainwashing on fraudulent premises.

          2. Towards the end of Carlin’s career, I didn’t think he was that funny. He started to rant and scare the $hit out of his audience.

    1. Up next: MSM articles deploring racist lending tactics that never mention the government’s complicity to support race-based mortgage lending…

  2. ‘We do hear a lot of those anecdotal stories about buyer’s remorse happening’

    Well yeah Nicole, in yer own office, zillow has been losing money flipping shacks quarter after quarter – for years! including red hotcakes Phoenix.

    ‘the recent sale of their luxury desert getaway in Phoenix, Ariz., that’s been sold for $3.1 million, a pocketbook punishing $700,000 less than the $3.9 million tax records show was paid for the property just over 13 years ago’

  3. ‘stacks of mortgage loans originated by the notorious Countrywide bear the signatures of three bank executives–if the papers were legit, a trio that could boast of superhuman powers. ‘It’s the same shit now,’ said a foreclosure defense lawyer who practices in Broward and commented anonymously, fearing retaliation’

    Shadow inventory is a conspiracy theory. So why would a lawyer fear retaliation? Cuz the REIC are dangerous dogs who would sell their grannies for one more months commission.

  4. ‘right at the last minute just before they finished this up, there were two very important amendments added,’ Szrman said. ‘The first amendment is, if we at the bank decide that we can’t do better than what you’ve already got, then we don’t have to do anything and we can foreclose on you right now. And the other thing is, you have to show some kind of hardship that is somehow directly related to the pandemic. Which is another way of saying, we can deny it under anything’

    There’s is always a public warm and fuzzy in the foreclosure biz, and how sh$t really works. Did you really think lenders were all in this together? There are multiple fiduciaries with trillions at stake. So the guberment just broke it off in borrowers a$$ too.

  5. I’ll never understand this the size of the home? Lots of people live with so much less stuff then10 years ago you dont need a 4 bedroom house for 2 people.

    1. “…stuff then10 years ago you dont need…”

      …stuff than10 years ago; you don’t need…

    2. This is very true. I don’t need a large collection of DVDs/tapes, CDs, records, books, etc. All are accessible digitally. Heck, I can lift my TV easily, contrast that with a large box from 15 years ago.

      1. I don’t need a large collection of DVDs/tapes, CDs, records, books, etc

        Ironically, I find myself trying to collect physical media these days, so that I can have it available if power is out, network is gone, and no one can take permission away from me (streaming services, ebooks, etc)

        1. Ironically, I find myself trying to collect physical media these days, so that I can have it available if power is out, network is gone, and no one can take permission away from me (streaming services, ebooks, etc)

          Valid.

    3. Raising children changes the logistics equation. A backyard with room to run, throw things, etc., aid in motor skill development. I just sold a girls junior 16″ bicycle that was like new; they outgrow their clothes and toys so quickly. Then there’s the sentimental attachment issues.

      1. If cars and trucks become less convenient, there is room to play in the street too! We did all sorts of games right in the street when I was a kid in Buffalo in the ’50s.

      2. Picturing a mom and dad frantically discussing the pros and cons of each property they look at in order to “aid in motor skill development” of their kids.

    4. Aren’t these new homeowners supposed to be Minimalists, saving their pennies for “experiences?” And doing all their banking and social media “on the go”?

  6. ‘Atlanta tops the list, with 17.4% of the city’s mortgages in delinquency as of May. The city also has a large share of FHA loans overall, with those loans representing over a fifth of all mortgages in the city. Many of the metro areas most threatened by such a scenario were located in Texas, including Houston (No. 2), Dallas (No. 4), San Antonio (No. 8) and Ft. Worth (No. 9)’

    This Texas thing started many years go and I documented it. I think it was a public media series that was ooh-wowing the eye watering prices in little places like Fredericksburg. Shacks that probably cost 40 grand just a few years earlier were selling for 350k and up. People out there didn’t then and never will be able to afford that. And the series showed it was all over the map. The Texas REIC wanted California prices, and they got em. Enjoy the bust.

    1. March 26, 2020

      “As America heads into a deep recession, the $11 trillion residential-mortgage market is in crisis. Investors who buy home loans packaged into bonds are dumping even those with federal backing because of panic that millions might not make their payments. Yet one risky sector had started to show cracks long before the coronavirus pandemic sparked the worst financial meltdown in 12 years: the federal government’s largest affordable-housing program, whose lenient terms are geared toward marginal borrowers.”

      “As real estate prices soared in recent years, working-class adults everywhere have increasingly relied on mortgages backed by the Federal Housing Administration — and U.S. taxpayers. Since 2007, the FHA’s portfolio has tripled in value to more than $1.2 trillion, almost 11% of the market. While private lenders make these loans, they are packaged into Ginnie Mae bonds, common in mutual funds and pensions.”

      “Before Covid-19 started roiling China, a November FHA report found that 27% of borrowers last year spent more than half their incomes on debt, a level it describes as ‘unprecedented.’ The share of FHA loans souring in their first six months has doubled over the last three years to almost 1%.”

      “Not long ago, Alex Castillo drove his shiny black Infiniti SUV through an office park north of the San Antonio airport, along a busy seven-mile stretch of highway that loan officers call ‘Mortgage Row’ because of its abundance of small independent mortgage companies that dominate FHA lending. Castillo, who has the words ‘The Dream Starts Here’ stitched into his jacket, works for Pennsylvania-based American Residential Lending. Oddly, amid the pandemic, his business is booming. His customers locked in FHA mortgages after interest rates plunged this month — adding to federally backed mortgage debt.”

      “‘If the government tells me you’re good enough to get a loan, I have to trust and believe in the government,’ Castillo said. ‘Then we just hope and pray that the client doesn’t get foreclosed on.’”

      “In downtown San Antonio, scores of investors stood on a parched lawn beside the city’s historic granite-and-red-sandstone courthouse. It was the first Tuesday of February, the day of the foreclosure auction. Matt Badders, a San Antonio lawyer who represents lenders, auctioned off two houses. The failed mortgages remind him of the run-up to the financial crisis 12 years ago, when lending to customers with spotty credit nearly brought down the world’s financial system. ‘We’re almost back to 2007, when mortgage originators are waking people up on park benches, saying sign here,’ Badders said.”

      “At the auction, the crowd bid on 338 homes, a third with FHA mortgages, according to Roddy’s Foreclosure Listing Service. One house had dual master bedrooms, a game room and granite kitchen counters. It sold for $202,000 — $52,000 less than the homeowner borrowed only two years ago. The taxpayer-backed FHA insurance fund will take a loss.”

      “Dave Stevens, FHA commissioner under President Barack Obama and former chief executive officer of the Mortgage Bankers Association, said a recession will expose hidden risks in home lending. ‘This should be an alarm bell to policymakers,’ Stevens said. ‘Sometimes you get blinded by a good economy and suddenly look at it and see a bubble of defaults coming.’”

      “The federal government has decided it doesn’t want to pursue — and has asked a judge to dismiss — a lawsuit against Utah-based Academy Mortgage Corp. The judge refused. The suit claims the company’s staff would repeatedly feed information into an automated federal underwriting system, manipulating it until the computer gave the green light. ‘Decline is a curse word,’ Plaintiff Gwen Thrower, a former underwriter, quoted a manager as saying. ‘We don’t use it.’”

      http://housingbubble.blog/?p=3070

      1. ‘a November FHA report found that 27% of borrowers last year spent more than half their incomes on debt, a level it describes as ‘unprecedented.’ The share of FHA loans souring in their first six months has doubled over the last three years to almost 1%’

        Think about these numbers. Massive default is the only way it can be resolved.

        I want to point something else out; the AEI (who have gone over to the dark side, BTW) repeatedly said FHA was supposed to be counter-cyclical and Fannie Freddie were pro-cyclical. So FHA was supposed to pull back in booms and start lending when the market rolled over. Good old Mel Watt, under Obammie, changed that so all the GSE’s were pedal to the metal at the same time. Now the chickens have come home to roost.

        1. “‘a November FHA report found that 27% of borrowers last year spent more than half their incomes on debt, a level it describes as ‘unprecedented.’”

          Only 27%. Very disappointing. More work needs to be done in this area.

        2. “Think about these numbers. Massive default is the only way it can be resolved.”

          I sure hope we collectively do a good job of connecting the dots to the post-2008 government-sponsored subprime lending binge.

        3. If my maths are correct, the numbers show that Atlanta as a whole is close to 4% delinquent just in FHA loans. Historically this is a big number and FHA is only 1/5 of the market there which means the whole city is easily over 5% delinquent in home loans without any further data to go on. It really isn’t a big stretch to predict 10% overall and it could be higher than that there! Rentals are probably going to be similar. They say Houston is number 2 on the list. This would help explain the crime explosion they are having. There won’t be any easy solutions to this mess. This is why they keep rolling over the moratorium, they don’t know what else to do. Even if the government finally stops rolling it over we know from the last time around that the system couldn’t handle clearing much smaller numbers in a reasonable manner. I see lots of zombies.

  7. ‘the 2,137 single-family homes available for sale at the end of June is nearly 60% higher than May’s depressed count, and the active inventory of condos and townhomes rose 33.3% month-over-month to 985. Combined, the Denver area experienced a 50.5% gain in its active inventory, a new record for a monthly increase and six-fold higher than the 5.9% gain averaged between May and June’

    Harry Potter again.

    ‘In a year of coloring outside of the box, we may have just started to draw within the lines’

    I’m not sure what the hell yer trying to say Andy.

    1. ‘In a year of coloring outside of the box, we may have just started to draw within the lines’

      In short, CR8R

  8. Today is Wednesday, July 7th and Joe Biden is not the legitimately elected president of the United States.

    The 2020 election was stolen, and it was stolen by globalists. And these globalists all have names and addresses…

  9. “Realtors say, for some, an unsuspecting group is paying well over asking price for homes all across central Ohio.”

    And just who is it that makes up this “unsuspecting group”

    “With home appreciation values the highest they’ve ever been, corporate buyers are investing more heavily in central Ohio real estate.”

    Bahahahahaha … corporate buyers are an unsuspecting group. Got it.

    “And with some organizations targeting a relatively low return on their investment, these organizations bear the risk of a repeat crash like we saw in 2008.”

    “‘The more homes that they own as a percentage basis of our overall market, the bigger the risk is to the total market that the amount of inventory goes up by 25% overnight,’ said Troy Marsh, a local real estate agent, should one or more of these organizations choose to offload their Columbus assets.”

    The more homes they own the more equity wealth they create for themselves as a result of bidding up the prices for the houses they recently purchase.

    Is this a great world or not? Buy a bunch of houses at a certain price then buy a few more comparable ones at a higher price. By buying the few comparables at a higher price much equity wealth is magically generated for the many houses that were previously purchased at a lower price. IOW one can generate one’s own wealth by doing some selective over spending.

    I like it.

    1. ‘The more homes that they own as a percentage basis of our overall market, the bigger the risk is to the total market that the amount of inventory goes up by 25% overnight,’

      Awesome! I can’t wait to see the housing market version of last year’s oil price collapse and this year’s similar developments in meme stocks, cryptocurrencies, and lumber futures play out. The housing market version should prove far more interesting. And like others who have read and posted here since 2004, I’m tired of the Housing Bubble, and eager to see the financiers who orchestrated it get some well-deserved comeuppance.

      1. “I’m tired of the Housing Bubble, and eager to see the financiers who orchestrated it get some well-deserved comeuppance.”

        What you will likely see is these financiers getting some well-orchastraited taxpayer-funded bailouts.

      2. “Nicole Bachaud, an economic data analyst for Zillow says that buyer’s remorse in a market that has home prices rising, bidding wars & low supply overall – isn’t surprising. ‘We do hear a lot of those anecdotal stories about buyer’s remorse happening.’

        Bankrate says 64% of millennials have regrets after buying a home. …”

        Imagine how much those regrets might increase when the end of pandemic foreclosure and eviction moratoriums results in a return to normal inventory and home price levels, leaving lots of recent Millennial bid war winners underwater.

    2. “The more homes they own the more equity wealth they create for themselves as a result of bidding up the prices for the houses they recently purchase.”

      Don’t forget that these purchases are funded using money recently created by the Fed and pumped into mortgage backed securities for the express purpose of encouraging such purchases, in order to maintain housing market liquidity and support high prices.

      It’s a beautiful piece of financial rigging you bankers have crafted!

    3. “corporate buyers”

      I’m a believer. On a recent visit to NE Ohio I checked out the local happenings on Zillow and was shocked to see so many pending sales. As in, just about every listing. Never have I ever seen that before. When I saw it, my immediate thought was, “no way these are retail buyers.”

    1. The masks continue to drop. Even the military, who are sworn to defend the constitution, want to tear it up.

  10. Communist Party Lockdown Zealot Freaks Out When Asked About Her Beliefs

    https://summit.news/2021/07/06/communist-party-lockdown-zealot-freaks-out-when-asked-about-her-beliefs/

    A behavioral scientist who wants mask mandates to continue forever freaked out and refused to answer the question when asked if her lifetime membership of the Communist Party informed her beliefs.

    Susan Michie, who is advising the UK government as part of the SAGE scientific dictatorship which has had the country locked down for the best part of 15 months, was finally confronted during a segment on Good Morning Britain.

    When she was previously asked for how much longer social distancing, mask mandates and lockdowns should continue, Michie said “forever.”

    1. ” forever.”

      This is a insane position to take.
      This mask nonsense has taken on a life of it own as a symbol of the New World Order of Communist cult group think. No basis in being medically necessary , and actually harmful to air flow needed.

      The scary thing about this new breed of Communist, is that they already have a psychotic disconnect with reality that alarming. What kind of brainwashing produced this level of disconnect .

      1. “What kind of brainwashing produced this level of disconnect .”

        Our educational system, in particular our system of higher education? The educational system that is reputed to be the envy of the world?

  11. Allen, TX Housing Prices Crater 15% As The Wheels Come Off Plano And Dallas Housing Market

    https://www.movoto.com/allen-tx/market-trends/

    As a national land broker advised, “Land is riskiest asset out there. It’s a gamble considering land prices dive 40% before you can ever possibly get a sale.”

  12. “Around 14.7% of the 7.6 million FHA mortgages outstanding nationwide were delinquent as of May, up slightly from the previous month. Additionally, 10.5% of these loans were seriously delinquent, meaning they were 90 days or more past due and in danger of going into default.”

    Between FHA borrowers not making any payments during pandemic forbearance measures and renters not making payments during pandemic eviction moratoriums, there’s a parallel universe of payment-free occupancy on the flip side of inventory shortages and high rents and purchase prices in the market for people who have to pay for their housing.

  13. Canada has real crazy house prices now, and their “Woke” mobs are taking out any statues and monuments they can find ,and there’s no push-back …..And they never had slaves………I look for them to spiral down into a third world type country soon,once the debt takes over .
    I lived in Canada ,for 20 years , and they really do think different then those south of the border , think it has something to do with the cold winters there.

    1. Canada’s National Archive Cancels Country’s First Prime Minister

      by Paul Joseph Watson
      July 7th 2021, 6:14 am

      Canada’s national archive has effectively canceled the country’s first Prime Minister Sir John Alexander Macdonald by deleting a page about him because it was “offensive” and didn’t represent Canada as “diverse and multicultural.”

      “Sir John Alexander Macdonald, born in Scotland, was Canada’s first prime minister. He is famous for his role in the establishment of Canada as a country on July 1 1867. Some of his other notable achievements include building the Canadian Pacific Railway and forming a strong Conservative Party,” writes Dan Frieth.

      However, it is Macdonald’s role in passing the Indian Act, which mandated that children from indigenous tribes assimilate into Christian boarding schools, that has drawn the ire of far-left activists.

      After an unknown number of complaints (it may have been just one), Canada’s national archive website apologized and vowed to remove all offending material about Macdonald and any other historical figure who upsets 21st century woke imbeciles.

      https://www.infowars.com/posts/canadas-national-archive-cancels-countrys-first-prime-minister/

    2. Canada DID have slaves. Due to geography, they never had large-scale plantations like the USA southern states, but make no mistake, there were slaves in Canada. The First Nations people (aboriginals) and European settlers both engaged in the practice.

      1. During the time of the Underground Railroad in the US, the blacks who made it all the way to Canada were collected and put on ships to be recycled in the slave trade.

  14. The racist white dude’s mouth definitely wrote a check he couldn’t cash, That being said, the video titled “Edward Cagney Mathews really thought” is funny.

    BLM Surround Man’s Suburban Home Over ‘Racist Rant,’ Assault Him And Police, Smash Up His Home, Leave Neighborhood Trashed

    Chris Menahan
    InformationLiberation
    Jul. 06, 2021

    http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=62356

    1. Mount Laurel. Home of the NJ Mt. Laurel decision from years ago. Basically a carbon-credit selling process for low-income housing developments.

        1. What good is having a 1st Amendment right to free speech, when you can be arrested and prosecuted for exercising said “right”?

          1. “What good is having a 1st Amendment right to free speech”

            If you watch and listen to the “Edward Cagney Mathews really thought” video in the http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=62356 the person yelling the same word while the dude was getting arrested was allowed free speech and I haven’t seen or heard of any mob outside their door.

    1. Well that sheds some light on that story but doesn’t bode well for the burbs if you look closely at the Agenda 21 like plans of the Marxists who are currently sticking notes in Joe Biden’s pocket and writing the words on his teleprompter.

      “The Mount Laurel doctrine is a controversial judicial interpretation of the New Jersey State Constitution. The doctrine requires that municipalities use their zoning powers in an affirmative manner to provide a realistic opportunity for the production of housing affordable to low- and moderate-income households.”

      Biden’s ‘infrastructure’ plan wages war on the suburban dream

      By Betsy McCaughey
      May 17, 2021

      If you saved your money and bought a house in the suburbs, your investment and lifestyle may soon come under attack. The single biggest item in President Biden’s “infrastructure” bill, now being negotiated with Congress, is $213 billion he claims will be used to increase affordable housing.

      What he really wants is to put the federal government in charge of local zoning and to install apartment buildings throughout single-family-home neighborhoods.

      That $213 billion is nearly twice the spending on roads and bridges. It would change towns everywhere and, for many families, torpedo the American Dream of a house with a patch of lawn.

      The Biden plan’s backers are hypocrites. Biden himself owns a four-acre lakefront home in upscale Greenville, Del., where there is absolutely no public housing, affordable housing or rentals that accept housing vouchers. And don’t expect any to be built next door to the Bidens.

      https://nypost.com/2021/05/17/bidens-infrastructure-plan-wages-war-on-the-suburban-dream/

      1. install apartment buildings throughout single-family-home neighborhoods.

        I do a lot of walking and driving in residential areas, and I’ve seen some mixed housing. It doesn’t seem too bad: like a row of luxury townhomes on the edge of an upper-class neighborhood. Or a side street of average townhomes in a nabe of small SFH, or a couple apartment buildings on the corners at the edge of a development of small SFH. The variety was actually quite pleasant. But this seems to work best if the mixed housing is no more than 1-2 tiers apart; not much economic distance between housing types. Examples: in an expensive neighborhood, the townhomes should be luxury. In a street of small SFH, the townhomes can be plain-jane. In a development of townhomes, multifamily is acceptable.

        But I get the impression that these commies want to tear down a single mansion and plunk down a Project tower like they had in The Wire, just to achieve “equity.”

  15. On May 20, Szerman used his knowledge of recent legislation on home foreclosures during a discussion on the Hometown Morning Show on KHTS

    For those interested: https://youtu.be/d1-rq2NTR8Y

    I was actually looking for this guy last week but only remembered Santa Clarita.

  16. I think it was Bernanke who said the US couldn’t go bankrupt because it could always print dollars to pay off its debt. But that’s not right though. Theoretically, if a currency collapses, and the purchasing power drops to zero, then 10 trillion times zero is zero value repaid. If you talk merely in terms of the slips of paper, rather than its purchasing power, then I suppose you can always “repay”. But if there’s any foreign debt, then that could not be repaid, as the exchange rate will become infinite.

    1. And speaking of the Bernank, here are 30 of his quotes that are famously absurd or wrong: https://www.businessinsider.com/bernanke-quotes-2010-12

      It’s fun to play, “guess the dates”:

      “House prices have risen by nearly 25 percent over the past two years. Although speculative activity has increased in some areas, at a national level these price increases largely reflect strong economic fundamentals.”

      “Housing markets are cooling a bit. Our expectation is that the decline in activity or the slowing in activity will be moderate, that house prices will probably continue to rise.”

      1. Technically he is correct.

        But there remains the pesky issue of the nebulous feedback loop between high debt levels creating incentive for the Fed to use debt monetization to keep interest rates suppressed, low interest rates tempting politicians to drive debt even higher, and how it all ends.

        Fire and Ice
        By Robert Frost

        Some say the world will end in fire,
        Some say in ice.
        From what I’ve tasted of desire
        I hold with those who favor fire.
        But if it had to perish twice,
        I think I know enough of hate
        To say that for destruction ice
        Is also great
        And would suffice.

  17. “Bankrate says 64% of millennials have regrets after buying a home. Many say the biggest problems they face include feeling financially unprepared for the costs of home ownership, overpaying on the sales prices and disliking their size of the home. With the urgency in the market – a lot of people are moving really quickly – and you maybe didn’t consider all the factors of the house that they’re looking to purchase, Bachaud said,

    ****************
    ‘but we’re not going to see prices coming down at all – we’re going to continue to see these prices increase over the year and next coming years.’”
    ****************
    Is that so?

  18. Get ready for it! Lamda variant from Peru with 8 mutations driven by their vaccine campaign per Dr. Peter (McCullough) with Dr. Drew yesterday. Someone in the YT comments actually called Dr. Peter anti-vaxx misinformation.

    1. driven by their vaccine campaign

      What was driven by the vaccine campaign? The evolution of the variant or the growing dominance of the variant?

        1. Thank you for the timestamp Redhead. Here what he says:

          Dr. McCullough: Lambda is clearly a product of a mutation in response to that mass vaccination.

          Lambda (C.37), with all 8 of its mutations, was first detected in August of 2020 in Peru.* Peru didn’t start rolling out a vaccine until March of 2021. Lambda CLEARLY evolved long before any vaccinations.

          Now, it’s plausible that mass vaccination helped to select for Lambda’s dominance because Lambda has the most escape from the Sinovac vaccine. But Lambda did not evolve “in response to” vaccinations. So either you’re misinterpreting, or he’s lying. This is why I asked.

          —————–
          *See Table 2 in this WHO doc: https://www.who.int/publications/m/item/weekly-epidemiological-update-on-covid-19—15-june-2021
          [You’ll have to download the PDF.]

          1. So either you’re misinterpreting, or he’s lying.

            Those aren’t the only options.

          1. I had to include a reference quote for any other people who are reading this but may not have seen the video. That’s pretty standard practice for any discussion.

  19. Why San Diego is in for BIG Housing Market SLOWDOWN
    SAN DIEGO
    Dan Parker – Best Life San Diego
    Published on May 28, 2021
    In this video, I’ll talk about the housing market slowdown in San Diego and what that means for home buyers.

    This is a really important topic to understand if you’re thinking about buying a home or selling your own.

  20. There’s a massive bubble in housing bubble babble…just like in 2006.

    Also in bubble denial. Lol!

    1. Orange County Register
      News
      Housing Opinion Columnist
      Bubble watch: California ‘housing crash’ searches surge
      ‘Housing bubble’ searches up 250% from March 2020
      STAFF GRAPHIC
      By Jonathan Lansner | Orange County Register
      PUBLISHED: June 8, 2021 at 11:18 a.m. |
      UPDATED: June 10, 2021 at 7:35 p.m.
      “Bubble Watch” digs into trends that may indicate economic and/or housing market troubles ahead.

      Buzz: Housing crash concerns, expressed through online search trends, jumped this spring — back near levels seen in the early days of the pandemic.

      Source: My trusty spreadsheet analysis of data from Google Trends compares and combines peaks and valleys of search patterns for two phrases linked to real estate troubles — “housing bubble” and “housing crash” — and two phrases of simple interest in property — “home prices” and “housing market” — back to 2004.

      The trend

      If you assume online searches can be tied to popular thinking, eyes are on housing almost like (1) a year ago when the economy was locked down and economic fears were sky-high and (2) the days of the bubble-bursting crash of the mid-2000s.

      Californians in May searched for these four key housing terms at a collective pace 69% above the 17-year average. This index hit its recent peak at 123% above average in March 2020, as COVID-19 was icing the economy. These searches then cooled to below average from October through January.

      However, May’s housing searches were at the highest level, minus the pandemic era, since the mid-bubble-bursting days of 2007. And they’re nearly triple the pre-coronavirus amount of crash concerns of 2015-19.

      By the way, my search index shows even greater housing curiosities nationwide. That may be because California is far from the hottest U.S. housing market.

      U.S. searches for these key terms were 107% above average in May, the 10th highest level on record, and it’s not far from March 2020’s 121% pandemic peak. It’s more than triple the pre-pandemic average. And before coronavirus, the last time it was higher was 2006!

      The dissection

      A deep dive into the California numbers shows a growing thirst for online clues as to what’s behind the past year’s surprisingly sharp resurgence of home sales and exploding prices.

      Housing crash: May’s searches for this phrase were more than triple the historic pace — at the seventh-highest level since 2004 — and more than four times pre-pandemic anxiousness. The “crash or not” debate is red hot.

      Housing bubble: Searches in May ran 57% below average, but it’s on the rise — up 250% from March 2020 and almost double the pre-pandemic 2015-19 average. Remember, “bubble” wasn’t the first thing folks thought when the economy was first locked down. But skittishness grows.

      Home prices: May searches ran 9% above the historic pace, 6% above March 2020, and more than double the pre-pandemic five-year average. That seems modest considering the past year’s rapid home appreciation.
      Home Stretch newsletter follows SoCal housing! Subscribe here.

      Housing market: With the wildest purchasing pace since before the Great Recession, it’s no shock to see May’s searches for overall housing conditions running 84% above average — the 13th highest level in 17 tears — or 161% above pre-pandemic patterns.

      How bubbly?

      On a scale of zero bubbles (no bubble here) to five bubbles (five-alarm warning) … TWO BUBBLES!

      Watching the housing market has become, at a minimum, a pandemic era fad — with polls and a “Saturday Night Live” TV skit suggesting online real estate searches have odd erotic appeal.

      Now, my search index is by no means a perfect yardstick for housing anxieties. Yet finding these rising research habits as well as heightened searches for concerns can be viewed as a positive sign.

      For starters, you can hope that better-educated market participants make smart spending and investment decisions. More importantly, the sense of unease I see in these numbers could help put a much-needed chill on a feeding frenzy.

      What was a remarkable homeownership rebound has evolved into an unnerving and unhealthy housing market.

      Jonathan Lansner is business columnist for the Southern California News Group.

  21. Daily Breeze
    Opinion
    There’s no denying the California exodus
    California State Capitol in Sacramento (File photo: Robert Schlie, Getty Images)
    By Jon Coupal |
    PUBLISHED: May 2, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. | UPDATED: May 2, 2021 at 12:00 p.m.

    With human migration, there is something called the “gate test.” If a nation opens its gates, do people come in or do they flee? With the Berlin Wall, it was obvious. Once the wall fell, there was a rush of humanity from East to West, not the other way around. The “gate test” applies to states as well.

    The California gates are open and people are going, well, elsewhere. That fact was made abundantly clear this past week when Census results were announced and California lost a congressional seat for the first time in the state’s history.

    As Assemblyman Kevin Kiley put it on Twitter, “We just lost a seat in Congress. If the California Exodus is a myth, apparently the Census Bureau is in on it.” In the last decade, 1.3 million more people left California than came in from other states. And, it’s accelerating. Half a million people have left for other states in the last two years alone.

    Boosters of the status quo were quick to point out that California’s population actually grew overall, it just didn’t grow as fast as other states. But that misses the point.

    Net domestic migration is a measure of movement among states. Unlike population, it ignores international migration as well as number of births over deaths. Two decades ago, policy leaders and the media started paying attention to the fact that California was trending toward net domestic outmigration. Governors from other states, most notably Rick Perry from Texas, were openly poaching businesses from California arguing, correctly, that their states were better for businesses as well as the people they employ.

    Only more recently have progressive politicians and their media allies started to push back against the narrative that California had lost its golden shine. They cherry-pick statistics showing that California’s economy is still vibrant and that the state remains the world’s center for venture capital and high tech. But high tech was here way before the decline began and even there, high tech firms are gravitating to other states.

    California is no longer the state other Americans look to as the land of opportunity. It’s easy to see why. A recent article in Forbes by Americans for Tax Reform’s Patrick Gleason spells it out. “The average state and local tax burden for the seven states losing seats is 11.04%, which is more than 16% higher than the 9.48% average state and local tax burden for the six states picking up House seats,” Gleason writes. “In fact, the average top personal income tax rate for states losing seats in congress is 6.5%, which is 46% greater than the 4.45% average top income tax rate for states gaining seats.”

    California already has the highest income tax rate in America, the highest state sales tax rate in America and the highest gas tax in America. And despite claims that Proposition 13 has resulted in low property taxes, that isn’t true overall. California ranks 17th out of 50 states in per capita property tax collections. And yet, there are bills circulating around the state Legislature again this year to raise the income tax rate even higher (Assembly Bill 1253), impose a wealth tax on the richest Californians (Assembly Constitutional Amendment 8 and AB 310) and lower the vote needed to pass costly local bonds and special taxes (ACA1).

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