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We Have So Much New Product, And The Timing Of That Just Couldn’t Be Worse

A report from the Denver Channel in Colorado. “Daniel and Linda Sue Gonzalez are still moving into their home. The problem, according to the Gonzalez family, is the dozens of finishes and fixes that are still pending. They bought the house from Richmond American Homes before it was built. They say the many problems with the design have severely delayed their ability to settle in. ‘We actually started to set this stuff up. And then when they redid the ceiling they were like, ‘you have to get it all out of the way,’ she said.”

“Contact Denver7 has received numerous calls and emails from Richmond customers, who say they were pressured to move into their homes before the lots were complete. Now, they say, the company has left them to live in homes void of many finishing touches. ‘Our final walk-through was going to be on the (December) 14th,’ said Gonzales, explaining that the company promised to finish the home before they moved in a month later. ‘That was the first week of January and we are halfway through September.'”

“Jon Goodman, senior partner at the law firm Frascona Joiner Goodman & Greenstein that deals with housing issues, says buyers need to be careful before signing a contract. If home buyers feel lost in a contract, calling a lawyer is probably the best option. ‘Most buyers are not technicians in studying these contracts. In the same way, in theory, that I could do repair work on my own on my car, I don’t — I go to a professional.'”

“But for homeowners already locked in a contract, they say working with their builder is a work in progress.”

The Star Tribune in Minnesota. “The homes in the Heritage Park neighborhood in north Minneapolis are impeccable, the lawns kept short and green, the trash cans lined up in a row. Behind that order lies a homeowners association that regularly sends violation letters and collects fines. Michael Roberson has admittedly always paid his annual fees late, arguing that he doesn’t know what they go toward and that he keeps his yard and front porch tidy of his own volition.”

“He received a letter from the association this winter saying he owed $500 in unpaid fees, he said. Then the pandemic struck. His wife lost her job and he focused on paying off other bills. He got another letter in June informing him the association filed a foreclosure action on his house, he said. Roberson had to borrow money from friends to pay off more than $2,000, money he is still paying back.”

“‘Everything sounds threatening — that’s my biggest problem,’ he said. ‘You don’t have to threaten us. You just have to talk to us and let us know what it is that you need done.'”

The Astoria Post on New York. “The cost to rent an apartment in Queens has dropped by more than 5 percent from a year ago, according to a new report. Long Island City saw the steepest decline from last year to this year with a more than 15 percent decrease, according to the report. The amount paid for a Long Island City apartment is typically higher than what’s paid in other Queens neighborhoods and experts say the most expensive areas usually see the earliest and often largest decreases in rent when the market dips. Meanwhile, average rents in Astoria dropped by about 3.6 percent.”

From My Wabash Valley on Illinois. “A recent report from Apartment Guide shows the cost of rent fluctuating up and down across the state of Illinois as officials have temporarily paused evictions to prevent a surge of homelessness during the Coronavirus pandemic. Champaign saw its average monthly rent costs for one-bedroom apartments drop off at the steepest rate in the state, from $729 in January down to $512 in June, a six-month change of -29.8%, and a year-over-year change of -16.1%.”

“Industry insiders warned the moratorium on evictions could create a bankruptcy bubble for cash-strapped landlords and only delay the inevitable eviction for many jobless tenants. While the long term effects of the eviction ban have yet to be realized, in the short term, many property owners have lowered their prices, according to data from Apartment Guide.”

“‘Some of these higher priced units are actually coming down in price slightly depending on what landlords want to do,’ explained Apartment Guide’s managing editor Brian Carberry, ‘because landlords, it’s easier for them to rent something out for maybe $100 less than they might want to get for it, then have it sit vacant and not collect any rent on it at all.'”

The Daily Independent on Arizona. “Experts warn the economic crisis brought on by the novel coronavirus outbreak could continue and worsen. Of particular concern is a widely predicted eviction crisis, which when compounded by the preexisting shortage of affordable housing in the Phoenix metro, could push conditions for many moderate- and low-income residents from crisis to collapse. With additional unemployment boosts gone — and either returning significantly reduced or failing to materialize — renters remain protected only by a patchwork of federal and local protections set to expire between now and Christmas week.”

“The gravity of the situation is evident to Mark Stapp — a 30-year industry expert and Arizona State University professor at the W. P. Carey School of Business. ‘We’re already in a situation where we’ve got one of the highest levels of foreclosure and eviction, so it’s not going to take a lot to tip this thing beyond crisis,’ Mr. Stapp said. ‘We’re actually probably on the edge of crisis. Without significant, continued support, it could go into catastrophe.'”

“Professor Stapp said while he grasps the political implications faced by both sides of the stalled stimulus debate, it’s incumbent on legislative leaders to act decisively if disaster can be averted. ‘I am not a socialist, though that’s a term most people don’t really understand,’ he said. ‘But while we don’t want socialism, we do require social support, because we have an economy that is run by a lot of different types of people earning a lot of different wages, and we’ve got to able to support everybody.'”

From Community Impact on Texas. “In the six months since beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in Houston, the region’s apartments have lost all of their average rent gains from the past 12 months, according to a multifamily housing analytics firm. Houston apartments remain in a weakened position, due in large part to overall uncertainty in the job market and a surge of new construction adding supply, said Bruce McClenny, president of ApartmentData. ‘Real estate markets really depend upon job growth to grow,’ he said.”

“The drops are even more precipitous for high-end Class A properties, where the average rent for August was $1,463, its lowest in over two years. Occupancy rates are down to around 80% for Class A, as compared to around 90% for the market overall, partly because so many new units have become available. ‘We have so much new product, you know—we delivered 20,000-22,000 units in the last 12 months, and the timing of that just couldn’t be worse,’ McClenny said.”

The Orange County Register in California. “Rent hikes in Los Angeles and Orange counties shrunk by the largest amount in 10 years, according to the Consumer Price Index. Landlords’ pricing power had been cut by the pandemic’s economic damage, which has been especially hard on lower-income households that tend to be renters. Meanwhile, low mortgage rates have lured some of the rental market’s higher-income customers to become homeowners.”

“In addition, landlords have been unable to force to non-paying tenants due to government eviction moratoriums. One survey of owners of 31,500 downscale rentals in Orange and L.A. counties found just 63% of those landlords in mid-August had collected all of their rents.”

From Socket Site in California. “Asking rents in San Francisco have dropped another 7 percent and are now down over 20 percent from peak. And with listing activity having jumped another 70 percent over the past two months alone, there are now nearly three times as many apartments listed for rent in San Francisco than there were at the same time last year (and climbing).”

The Santa Barbara Ed Hat in California. “This is a question that I would like publicly answered by Limone and Jackson about their AB 3088 housing anti eviction bill. Why have you put the the inability of millions of tenants to pay their rent during the Covid 19 Epidemic, squarely on the backs of landlords to finance? The bill is immoral! It places the cost of lost income of tenants during the Covid pandemic solely on the financial backs of landlords.”

“Many landlords have mortgages and all have taxes, insurance and maintenance expenses, etc. They cannot operate on 25% of scheduled rents. A huge number of tenants, especially in the high rent areas and the rest of California are marginally able to pay rent during normal times. They will not be able to pay thousands in back rents when their payments are due.”

“Eventually, landlords will raise rents higher than they normally do in order to recover the rents that they cannot recover. Some landlords will leave their units vacant until this bill is no longer in effect. Other landlords will lose their properties when they are foreclosed by lenders. AB 3038 does not protect landlords from foreclosure, it prevents them from collecting the 75% of their rents that they need to make mortgage, taxes, insurance and maintenance payments!”

“Why have Limone, Jackson and their associates in Sacramento, who all continue to receive their good sized taxpayer paid paychecks, health and pension benefits, put this Covid 19 crisis on the backs of just landlords? Why don’t they pass a bill making gas stations cut their prices by 75%? The same for grocery stores, utilities and all other important resources: Cut all prices by 75%. Sounds crazy? Probably, but then this is what Jackson and Limone have thrust on landlords!”

“Is it no wonder that a majority of people living in California have said that they would leave, if they could. Many who can afford to leave, are leaving every day! Our state is going downhill in several measurable categories. We have 50% of our country’s homeless population and 34% of our country’s welfare recipients, but we are only 12% of our country’s population! We have the highest median cost of housing in the entire USA!”

“Our state’s GDP is up only about 1%! Its tax base is shrinking! More and more people are turning against government. They cannot be blamed for doing so. I am one of them! Remember in November!”

This Post Has 77 Comments
  1. ‘Contact Denver7 has received numerous calls and emails from Richmond customers, who say they were pressured to move into their homes before the lots were complete. Now, they say, the company has left them to live in homes void of many finishing touches’

    We’ve seen this movie before. Well, it was cheaper than renting!

  2. From the OCR article:

    ‘The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ CPI shows the local cost of renting rose at a 3.1% annual rate in August vs. 5.5% a year earlier. That’s the largest one-year drop since 2010.’

    Only up 3%, so far so good…

    ‘One survey of owners of 31,500 downscale rentals in Orange and L.A. counties found just 63% of those landlords in mid-August had collected all of their rents’

    A 3% increase when 37% got stiffed? This is typical of the game the REIC plays with statistics.

  3. ‘Our state is going downhill in several measurable categories. We have 50% of our country’s homeless population and 34% of our country’s welfare recipients, but we are only 12% of our country’s population! We have the highest median cost of housing in the entire USA!’

    We’re all in this together?

    1. I know of a young couple who moved to SoCal, with stars in their eyes. After 2 years they had enough and came back. The kicker is that they are quite liberal, yet they admit that California was a sh!thole and they couldn’t stand living there anymore.

      1. “.. yet they admit that California was a sh!thole and they couldn’t stand living there anymore…”

        No arguments from me.

        The five P’s — pee, poop, puke, pot and panhandlers

        Yet local government doesn’t even want to acknowledge its existence.

        I happen to live in Irvine [supposedly one the safest cities in the USA] and it is a rare day that I don’t see at least 1 homeless person and/or panhandler of some type. As recently as 1/2 hour ago as I write this I passed a homeless person sleeping on the OCbus bench (near Alton and Jeffrey) during my morning bike ride.

        I have lived here for 41 years now. None of these conditions existed even 5 years ago.

        If you want a real eyeful, trying driving up to DTLA. What a complete mess. Until Covid, I drove to Hollywood (near Sunset and Vine) to attend engineering meetings every couple of months. You actually had to be hyper-aware of your surroundings if you dared venture outside the secure parking/office area to get something to eat. Wasn’t that way even 20 years ago.

        The tide has really turned, at it is not good.

        1. I grew up in Irvine. (80s & 90s).

          You hardly ever saw a homeless person in Irvine or OC for that matter.

          The camps that sprung up for miles along the Santa Ana River were a major shock when I found out about them a couple years ago.

          I now live in West Hollywood and have watched Sunset Blvd in regular Hollywood get taken over with tents and now Wilshire Blvd in Miracle Mile outside my new office.

          This wasn’t the case up until a few years ago.

          Even in West Hollywood I encounter at least 5-10 homeless people cracked out of their minds on my daily 4 mile run.

          This wasn’t the case up until a few years ago.

          1. This wasn’t the case up until a few years ago.

            I’m sure Newsom and his fellow Democrats are pleased with the fundamental transformation they helped create.

        2. And Plastic (fake)

          Think Hollywood is fake, just attend a meeting or 2 with SV businesses. Wow the lies, the fakery, the deception. Unmatched anywhere.

        3. The tide has really turned, at it is not good.

          And it’s not limited to SoCal.

          I keep wondering how far away we are from a mass ‘fed up’ point with the homeless/crime/safety situation to actually cause a meaningful shift/snap and override the hard left and their ‘but, but, but these people have all these RIGHTS’ and (forcibly) prioritize the citizens who pay the taxes and and abide by the laws?

          1. Where are all these people who have no hope of being able to ever afford to pay housing mania level rents or purchase prices supposed to go? The government’s Affordable Housing programs have literally priced them out forever.

          2. Where are all these people … supposed to go?

            If they can do their job from a laptop, Oil City w@h. If not, Oil City Wal-Mart. I am told that (post-pandemic) lucky-ducky jobs are easy to find as long as you’re not on drugs.

    2. We have 50% of our country’s homeless population and 34% of our country’s welfare recipients, but we are only 12% of our country’s population!

      A real life sh!t show.

  4. ‘it’s incumbent on legislative leaders to act decisively if disaster can be averted. ‘I am not a socialist, though that’s a term most people don’t really understand…But while we don’t want socialism, we do require social support, because we have an economy that is run by a lot of different types of people earning a lot of different wages, and we’ve got to able to support everybody’

    Yer fooked Mark. But look on the bright side, interest rates are low.

    1. But while we don’t want socialism, we do require social support, because we have an economy that is run by a lot of different types of people earning a lot of different wages, and we’ve got to able to support everybody’

      Uh, that sounds like socialism.

      How about creating an environment the foments opportunity and affordable housing so that people can work and not need a handout to get by?

        1. ‘Desperation is what fueled around 200 restaurant and bar owners to gather in front of City Hall on the morning of Sept. 14. They had an urgent message to deliver to city officials. The rally—a passionate protest against the city’s restrictive lockdown measures—was also an appeal for additional funding from Congress before, a number of owners argued, the city’s once thriving restaurant industry is entirely obliterated.’

          ‘One topic at issue was the latest directive from New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who announced on Sept. 9 that restaurants would finally be allowed to open for indoor dining by Sept. 30, but with a 25 percent occupancy limit and other limitations. Owners told The Epoch Times the move to allow indoor dining was just too little, too late. They pointed out that other areas outside the city had already allowed 50 percent indoor and outdoor dining, and much earlier.’

          “We’re here trying to get our voices heard … in hopes the mayor, the governor will listen to us and realize the 25 percent openings are not enough, we need a minimum of 50 and 100 as soon as possible,” Ronan Conlon, owner of Banc Cafe, told The Epoch Times. “We’ve been quiet for too long.”

          https://www.theepochtimes.com/desperate-restaurant-owners-call-on-new-york-governor-to-ease-restrictions_3499248.html

      1. That would be the idea is to foster a society that people are self reliant.

        Sure some social programs are needed, usually should be short term relief, not welfare for 50years.
        There are all kinds of relief necessary.
        The rigged markets have created a lot of problems , so correction would be nice.
        It’s just when a person says they are entitled to this, that or the other thing, with no requirements , than it’s a racket..
        Those thugs running around saying words like give me your house is some kind of distortion of help from society.

  5. The drops are even more precipitous for high-end Class A properties, where the average rent for August was $1,463, its lowest in over two years. Occupancy rates are down to around 80% for Class A, as compared to around 90% for the market overall, partly because so many new units have become available. ‘We have so much new product, you know—we delivered 20,000-22,000 units in the last 12 months, and the timing of that just couldn’t be worse’

    Good thing the 20,000-22,000 units aren’t luxury. Oh, wait, they are probably all luxury.

    1. Good thing the 20,000-22,000 units aren’t luxury. Oh, wait, they are probably all luxury.

      Luxury in price, but not in amenities. The term “luxury” morphed into “I overpaid for this piece of sh!t so I’m jacking the rents.”

  6. ‘He received a letter from the association this winter saying he owed $500 in unpaid fees, he said. Then the pandemic struck. His wife lost her job and he focused on paying off other bills. He got another letter in June informing him the association filed a foreclosure action on his house, he said.’

    This is how it goes, Mike was riding the tide of sweet equity, then…

    ‘Roberson had to borrow money from friends to pay off more than $2,000, money he is still paying back. ‘Everything sounds threatening — that’s my biggest problem,’ he said. ‘You don’t have to threaten us. You just have to talk to us and let us know what it is that you need done’

    But interest rates? Pride of ownership!

  7. Glendale, CA Housing Prices Crater 17% YOY As One LA Broker Conceded, “We Ripped Off A Whole Bunch Of People”

    https://www.zillow.com/glendale-ca-91205/home-values/

    *Select price from dropdown menu on first chart

    As a noted economist said so eloquently, “A house is a rapidly depreciating asset that empties your wallet every day you own it. Rent a house for half the monthly cost of buying it.”

    1. “A house is a rapidly depreciating asset that empties your wallet every day you own it.”

      If you want a free, live, real time demonstration showing exactly what the ultimate destination is in store for the money that is emptied from your wallet drop on by any one of my bank branches.

      Please bring with you a complete list of your marketable body parts.

  8. ‘“Asking rents in San Francisco have dropped another 7 percent and are now down over 20 percent from peak. And with listing activity having jumped another 70 percent over the past two months alone, there are now nearly three times as many apartments listed for rent in San Francisco than there were at the same time last year (and climbing)’

    ‘Champaign saw its average monthly rent costs for one-bedroom apartments drop off at the steepest rate in the state, from $729 in January down to $512 in June, a six-month change of -29.8%, and a year-over-year change of -16.1%’

    ‘Industry insiders warned the moratorium on evictions could create a bankruptcy bubble for cash-strapped landlords’

    How do those 5% cap rates look now, cash-strapped landlords?

  9. I guess San Diego’s economy must be holding up fine during the COVID-19 pandemic, as the local realtor’s flier tells me that decrepit forty year old working class housing in our area is still selling at above asking for north of $800,000. So long as housing prices and the stock market remain elevated, we’re saved!

    1. “north of $800,000”

      The go-to response when you object: “6 months ago it woulda been $1.2M!”

      There are furniture “sales” peddled with less slime than this.

  10. Business
    San Diego tourism industry update: ‘We’re in a deep depression’
    San Diego downtown skyline
    With air travel down and large conventions no longer allowed because of COVID-19, San Diego County hotels and other businesses are hurting financially.
    (Howard Lipin / The San Diego Union-Tribune)
    As San Diego leaves behind the summer season, the local tourism industry worries that visitor spending will take an even deeper dive
    By Lori Weisberg
    Sep. 11, 2020
    12:24 PM

    As the novel coronavirus continues to linger well past what anyone expected in the early weeks of the pandemic, San Diego’s tourism industry is struggling to find any heartening news that will help reverse the economic devastation that so far has cost local businesses more than $3 billion in visitor spending.

    “In terms of the economy, we’re in a deep recession, and for the travel and tourism economy, unfortunately, we’re in a deep depression,” San Diego Tourism Authority Chief Operating Officer Kerri Kapich told City Council members this week during a presentation that paints a grim outlook for San Diego’s visitor industry in the coming months.

    She and other tourism officials reeled off, in somber tones, one bleak stat after another: A $150 million decline in hotel room tax revenue compared to two years ago; 50,000 visitor industry jobs vanished; overall hotel room revenue down this year nearly 60 percent.

    1. And this is in every destination city, all over the world, at the same time. Except for those places that didn’t shutdown of course.

      Are you safe? Here in September, are you safe? What happened to not overwhelming the hospitals? Flattening the curve? And all the other BS excuses we’ve had dumped on us? Gone and on to the next day of fearmongering.

      1. In 2019 my travel/expense budget came in somewhere just north of $100K.

        2020? So far, my wifi is still being paid for. #winning

  11. Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade 2020 Will Not Be Live Event, De Blasio Says By Stephen Andrew – September 14, 2020 11:30 am EDT
    The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, as fans have come to know it, has been formally cancelled for 2020. New York City mayor Bill De Blasio made the announcement on Monday, saying that instead of a live event, the team behind the parade is working on something unique. “It will not be the same parade we’re used to, it will be a different kind of event,” De Blasio said during his daily briefing, per WCBS. “They’re reinventing the event for this moment in history and you will be able to feel the spirit and the joy of that day on television, online, not a live parade but something that will really give us that warmth and that great feeling we have on Thanksgiving Day.”

  12. The Stawk Mawket seems pretty cheery this so far week. It can’t just be the news that Oracle is buying TikTok. That was yesterday. No doubt another Fed cash infusion at work.

  13. Kamala Harris accidentally refers to ‘Harris administration’ during roundtable

    By Yaron Steinbuch
    September 15, 2020

    The vice presidential candidate got a bit ahead of herself when she referred to the “Harris administration,” while discussing economic plans during a virtual roundtable.

    “A Harris administration, together with Joe Biden as the president of the United States,” she said Saturday before correcting her apparent Freudian slip.

    https://nypost.com/2020/09/15/kamala-harris-accidentally-touts-plan-under-harris-administration/

      1. And yet I keep hearing it’ll be Biden’s policies and positions not Harris’.

        They will be his policies. And his policies will be whatever she says they are.

        1. his policies will be whatever she says they are

          Not according to the spokespeople pushing the “moderate” farce. If it’ll be a de facto Harris presidency, she should debate Trump. As an attorney, she should be better at debating than she is. Defensively, she sucks (see, e.g., Tulsi Gabbard smackdown). Offensively, she’s too rehearsed (see, e.g., Joe Biden attack).

          1. (see, e.g., Tulsi Gabbard smackdown)

            If the DNC were a democracy she would be on the ticket with Bernie right now.

          1. Nope, Bernie Sanders is getting in there also in influence also.
            Biden was talking up the climate change BS a couple days ago. They are avoiding the health care subject so far.

          2. avoiding the health care subject

            I saw Biden addressing that not too long ago. “Meanie Orange Man Bad is trying to get rid of people’s affordable health insurance during a pandemic.”

  14. “‘Everything sounds threatening — that’s my biggest problem,’ he said. ‘You don’t have to threaten us. You just have to talk to us and let us know what it is that you need done.’”

    No, Michael, your biggest problem is that you’re a deadbeat who bought a shack you can’t afford and is now pathetic enough to hit up your friends for loans. You already know what needs to be done: pay your HOA when it’s due. Otherwise, GTFO. I hear housing is more affordable in Appalachia.

  15. Professor Stapp said while he grasps the political implications faced by both sides of the stalled stimulus debate, it’s incumbent on legislative leaders to act decisively if disaster can be averted. ‘I am not a socialist, though that’s a term most people don’t really understand,’ he said. ‘But while we don’t want socialism, we do require social support, because we have an economy that is run by a lot of different types of people earning a lot of different wages, and we’ve got to able to support everybody.’”

    It’s funny how all these collectivists always claim they’re not socialists (cough Dora cough), then proceed to describe socialism as the way to cure all of society’s ills. #NotFooledByYourBoshevikBullshit

  16. “This is a question that I would like publicly answered by Limone and Jackson about their AB 3088 housing anti eviction bill. Why have you put the the inability of millions of tenants to pay their rent during the Covid 19 Epidemic, squarely on the backs of landlords to finance? The bill is immoral!

    A greedy landlord invoking morality to appeal to Democrats. That’s rich. Got fat enough brown envelops? The collectivist comrades might see things your way. Otherwise, they will ALWAYS default to enabling and encouraging parasitism and freeloading.

  17. From Wikipedia

    “Eternal Flame” is a song recorded by American pop rock group the Bangles for their 1988 album, Everything,

    In the BBC programme I’m in a Girl Group, Hoffs revealed she actually sang the studio recording of the song completely naked after Sigerson pranked her by telling her Olivia Newton-John recorded unclad (a falsehood Sigerson eventually admitted to).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_Flame_(song)

    In light of this new (to me) information I feel I have no choice but to post this…

    https://youtu.be/PSoOFn3wQV4

      1. “Cue the “This is relevant to my interests” memes…”

        Susanna Hoffs has been relevant to my interests for over 30 years.

        Remember Bangles star Susanna Hoffs? Thirty years after the band’s heyday, she’s one of the hottest 57-year-olds out there

        Tim Nixon
        25 Sep 2016, 9:13Updated: 26 Sep 2016, 10:47

        SUSANNA Hoffs adorned the walls of many a teenage boy’s bedroom in her 1980s heyday.

        Fast-forward 30 years to 2016, and she’s still just as impressive in appearance at the age of 57.

        https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/1840054/remember-bangles-star-susanna-hoffs-thirty-years-after-the-bands-heyday-shes-one-of-the-hottest-57-year-olds-out-there/

    1. Jeff, it’s a really nice evening camping in the foothills above Salida. 93.7FM KSBV The River Rat is on the radio. It’s not gonna rain, so no cover on the tent. With the new moon tomorrow the stars should be excellent.

      1. That would be one awesome opening scene for a movie.

        I always enjoy your posts, pictures and words you choose to describe your time camping, skiing and hiking.

      2. You might be able to pick up their new morning radio show: “Creepy Joe and Camel Toe in the Mornings”. I understand that it’s ghost-written though. Seems to be syndicated pretty widely in certain markets…

  18. Bodycam Video Shows Shooting of Two Tulsa Police Officers

    Sep 14, 2020

    Tulsa, Oklahoma — The body camera footage from the murder of Sergeant Craig Johnson and the attempted murder of Officer Aurash Zarkeshan has been released by Tulsa Police Department.

    https://youtu.be/MSa2EomQAbA?t=160

    1. “Body camera footage showed Ware arguing with the police after he was pulled over for expired paper tags, KTUL reported. Ware refused to exit the vehicle after he was informed that the car would likely be towed. The encounter escalated from there before one of the officers tried to tase Ware. He was able to pull out the taser prongs, however, and continued to be belligerent. One of the officers then used pepper spray to subdue him, but Ware remained defiant. After the officers tried to forcibly remove him from the car, he retrieved a gun from under his seat and began firing at them. Both men were shot several times, according to the arrest affidavit. Ware finally stepped out of the vehicle and fired three more shots as he stood over the wounded policemen.”

      David Anthony Ware, 32, was likely a 2-strikes felon facing his 3rd.

      1. Truly sad.

        As I have maintained they pulled this piece of sh#t’s @ss over because he was driving a beater with a bad tag and looked like a druggy not because of the color of his skin. Cops profile everybody.

        It’s just a shame this piece of sh#t didn’t end up in the cops kill twice as many whites as blacks every year statistics.

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